HFBoards

Go Back   HFBoards > General Hockey Discussion > The Rink
The Rink For the not so ready for prime-time players, coaches, referees, and the people that have to live with them. Discuss experiences in local leagues, coaching tips, equipment, and training.

The Hockey Noob Chronicles II (Beginners' Thread)

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old
08-13-2013, 02:09 AM
  #551
Sharppi
Nothing to see here
 
Sharppi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Finland
Country: Finland
Posts: 2,671
vCash: 500
Mmmyeah I kinda figured out the problem with my Grafs. I have just too wide feet for them and I'm generally too heavy for those novice-level Grafs. Also. I'm 6'5 tall and I definitely don't weigh under 180lbs. So it's new skates for me this autumn. Lets see if this helps with the horrible pain in my feet.

I'm also quite angry for the ****** service I got from that sports store where I bought those skates. Overpriced and bad service.

Sharppi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-14-2013, 07:19 AM
  #552
TickleMeYandle
Not so fast,
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Country: Jamaica
Posts: 1,261
vCash: 500
Well, I've not been here for a while but here's my status update.

After a bad season, the captain of our losing team decided to shake things up a bit. I got moved back to D, paired with my husband. I've always played LW (sometimes RW) as that seems to be the least dangerous place for me to be - I don't really do much there, but can't really hurt anything either. I had no clue really what to do my first game, but after a couple of shots at it I started to feel more comfortable. We actually had a really good game on Sunday. the team that went undefeated all season ended up getting shut out in both games they played for the round robin. You could tell they were really frustrated.

Our first game was great, I actually caught a shot on my stick in front of the crease. I was shocked that it landed there. But I think the best moment was when one of the best players on the other team was coming into the zone and right as he crossed the blue line, I snagged the puck from him. I'm pretty sure I heard an expletive or two after that one.

But then my husband's skate broke - the blade just snapped in half. He ended up having to use a pair of rental skates for the final game, which made us much less effective. He couldn't turn or stop, so he just ended up kind of coasting around out there. Bummer, it would have been fun to be able to play with him at 100%.

TickleMeYandle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-15-2013, 01:56 PM
  #553
CarvinSigX
Registered User
 
CarvinSigX's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Illinois
Country: United States
Posts: 7,929
vCash: 2616
I'm going to try and record my play tonight. I've never played any organized hockey, and it's just inline, but I'd like to see what I'm doing right and wrong. I'm playing with people that are much more skilled than I, so I'm sure it'll be a trainwreck.

CarvinSigX is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-16-2013, 01:53 PM
  #554
JPGoHabsGo
Registered User
 
JPGoHabsGo's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 531
vCash: 500
I dont really skate often. But I wanna try playing some hockey. Wanted to my whole life but was just never good enough at skating. Any advice?

JPGoHabsGo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-16-2013, 03:31 PM
  #555
windycity
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Well duh
Posts: 3,122
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by JPGoHabsGo View Post
I dont really skate often. But I wanna try playing some hockey. Wanted to my whole life but was just never good enough at skating. Any advice?
1. Take some basic skating lessons - can't emphasize that enough
2. see if you can find instructional hockey where you can work on skating and skills and with some scrimmage time to apply what you've been learning. As you get better, you can look into joining a beginner or other low level league
3. start asap, you will be addicted in no time
4. The Habs rule

windycity is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-20-2013, 06:23 AM
  #556
blackat
Rookie User
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Sydney, Australia
Country: Australia
Posts: 25
vCash: 500
I explained this a little bit in the skates thread, but I'm having trouble finding my edges after I got my skates sharpened about a month ago (1/2). Maybe I've just been used to skating with blunt blades for so long, but I feel like I'm gliding over the ice rather than cutting into it. Should I have gotten a deeper sharpen? I'm pretty light, probably about 127 pounds and I'm 5'8. I'm going to get new skates when I move to NJ in about five months, but for now I just need a solution or some pointers to what's going on.

blackat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-20-2013, 07:54 AM
  #557
PorkChopSandwiches
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 428
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by blackat View Post
I explained this a little bit in the skates thread, but I'm having trouble finding my edges after I got my skates sharpened about a month ago (1/2). Maybe I've just been used to skating with blunt blades for so long, but I feel like I'm gliding over the ice rather than cutting into it. Should I have gotten a deeper sharpen? I'm pretty light, probably about 127 pounds and I'm 5'8. I'm going to get new skates when I move to NJ in about five months, but for now I just need a solution or some pointers to what's going on.
At that weight, if you are a really strong skater you should have no problem with a 5/16" or even 1/4" hollow. I would never recommend going any more shallow than 3/8" ( the usual default hollow ), im assuming you arent asking for a specific hollow?

If you are just starting out then it it most likely your technique and you might simply be 'railroading' and not pushing off, flicking the toe and snapping that knee up. Even younger skaters about your weight can make the ice crunch.

PorkChopSandwiches is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-20-2013, 09:24 AM
  #558
Proust
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 1,989
vCash: 500
I pretty much taught myself how to skate at 17 and am 30 now. My biggest issue is that I put no weight on my inside skate when I am stopping or turning. Sometimes I watch guys stop on only their inside skate (using the outside edge) and I am left in awe.

Help.

Proust is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-20-2013, 11:52 AM
  #559
CanucksSayEh
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 3,505
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Proust View Post
I pretty much taught myself how to skate at 17 and am 30 now. My biggest issue is that I put no weight on my inside skate when I am stopping or turning. Sometimes I watch guys stop on only their inside skate (using the outside edge) and I am left in awe.

Help.
I don't put much weight on the back foot either when stopping with both feet, but I can still stop at high speed with just the back foot out infront. Practice that a bunch and then just try to slowly incorporate it into your full stop. Eventually you can get real good and lift your front foot so when you step off the ice onto the bench, you look like a pro.

CanucksSayEh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-20-2013, 02:11 PM
  #560
JKinCLE
Registered User
 
JKinCLE's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
Country: United States
Posts: 261
vCash: 500
This thread has tons of people like me, so I figure I'd seek some advice too. I played hockey when i was about 10 in a mite in-house league, and quickly became discouraged after seeing the 6 year olds out skating me and having the hardest time learning to stop, and finally quit once i was informed i was too old to play at the Cleveland Lumberjacks game in between periods with my team.

Fast forward 12 years and I decided I wanted to try again, so during my senior year at kent state, I took a beginning ice hockey course. I got my feet back underneath me pretty quick, and actually have a decent shot (surprisingly), but still haven't been able to stop all that well, and my skates (bought them used, a pair of vapor's with some life left in em) always grinded into my ankles to the point where they would bleed, only to scab over and be ripped off during my next class session. Obviously this was an ankle support issue, and even taping my ankles didnt seem to help. I heard about "baking" skates to mold to my foot/ankle. Any advice on this? I feel like this is the a large contributing factor in holding me back from learning to properly stop. I can shave the ice using my edges already, but actually applying this to stopping is just so damn elusive to me. Im sure there is a large mental barrier to overcome as well. Sorry for ranting...

tl;dr: 23 years old, wants to play hockey, can skate but can't really stop (ala Luis Mendoza), bad ankle support with my used skates. Also, does anybody play rec hockey in Cleveland?

JKinCLE is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-20-2013, 02:35 PM
  #561
Brunomics
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Medford
Country: United States
Posts: 5,289
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by SirJoshuaJTB View Post
This thread has tons of people like me, so I figure I'd seek some advice too. I played hockey when i was about 10 in a mite in-house league, and quickly became discouraged after seeing the 6 year olds out skating me and having the hardest time learning to stop, and finally quit once i was informed i was too old to play at the Cleveland Lumberjacks game in between periods with my team.

Fast forward 12 years and I decided I wanted to try again, so during my senior year at kent state, I took a beginning ice hockey course. I got my feet back underneath me pretty quick, and actually have a decent shot (surprisingly), but still haven't been able to stop all that well, and my skates (bought them used, a pair of vapor's with some life left in em) always grinded into my ankles to the point where they would bleed, only to scab over and be ripped off during my next class session. Obviously this was an ankle support issue, and even taping my ankles didnt seem to help. I heard about "baking" skates to mold to my foot/ankle. Any advice on this? I feel like this is the a large contributing factor in holding me back from learning to properly stop. I can shave the ice using my edges already, but actually applying this to stopping is just so damn elusive to me. Im sure there is a large mental barrier to overcome as well. Sorry for ranting...

tl;dr: 23 years old, wants to play hockey, can skate but can't really stop (ala Luis Mendoza), bad ankle support with my used skates. Also, does anybody play rec hockey in Cleveland?
Buy new skates. Seriously it's the most important piece of gear you could possibly own and you will be much better off in the long run. You don't need to buy top end skates but a good mid range skate will do wonders for you considering your ankles.

When it comes to stopping you'll get it eventually. Just don't be afraid to fall down.

Brunomics is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-07-2013, 02:37 AM
  #562
Pohlow
Registered User
 
Pohlow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Frisco, Tx
Posts: 1,183
vCash: 500
Looking to buy my first ice hockey stick. If I hold my right hand at the bottom of the shaft, and my left hand at the top of the knob, do I need a right handed or left handed stick? (I'm right handed) I know it seems like a damn obvious answer (right handed get the right handed stick), but before I spend the money on a stick I want a straight answer x.x

Pohlow is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-07-2013, 02:46 AM
  #563
nullterm
Registered User
 
nullterm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Port Moody, BC
Country: Canada
Posts: 2,541
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pohlow View Post
Looking to buy my first ice hockey stick. If I hold my right hand at the bottom of the shaft, and my left hand at the top of the knob, do I need a right handed or left handed stick? (I'm right handed) I know it seems like a damn obvious answer (right handed get the right handed stick), but before I spend the money on a stick I want a straight answer x.x
Then you will shoot right.

Just think of which side of your body the puck would be on naturally. Left side, left shot. Right side, right shot.

...

Some food for thought, if you are about to learn anyways from step 0, and are right handed, then maybe consider having your right hand on top. It may take a bit longer to learn shooting, but stick handling will come more naturally.

Your top hand is actually the one that does most of the stick/puck control. The bottom hand is more about just supporting the stick and applying force for shots, which doesn't require alot of dexterity.

I'm right handed, shoot right, so dominant hand down on the stick. And I'm assbackwards. Kinna wish I learned the other way for better puck control, but too late to turn back now.

nullterm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-08-2013, 10:37 AM
  #564
TickleMeYandle
Not so fast,
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Country: Jamaica
Posts: 1,261
vCash: 500
If you hold a stick, you'll probably be able to figure out which one feels right.

I'm a righty, but I shoot left. Holding a right stick just feels so uncomfortable and icky. Yet a lot of righties shoot right as well and feel the same way about a lefty stick!

TickleMeYandle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-12-2013, 04:32 PM
  #565
savebyrask
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Boston
Country: United States
Posts: 40
vCash: 500
Hi, so I'm really new to skating and I actually just started a week ago. I think I've been doing pretty well, but one issue I've noticed is I'm terrible at stopping with my left foot (I'm a righty). I'm pretty decent at stopping with my right foot on the outside, but with my left it's just a giant pile of suck. I can barely do it at a slow speed. I learned how to do crossover the other day and with those, my left side is basically 95% as good as my right so it's not that I'm completely incapable of using my non-dominant side, but for some reason I can't stop. I think it might have to do with the fact that when I stop I put a lot of pressure on my right skate, and it ends up kind of digging into the ice so I actually stop, but when I'm trying to do it with the left, I'm not putting as much pressure on my left skate and it just ends up gliding over the ice I end up turning instead of stopping. Any pointers?

savebyrask is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-12-2013, 04:38 PM
  #566
Malarowski
Registered User
 
Malarowski's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 367
vCash: 822
Quote:
Originally Posted by savebyrask View Post
Hi, so I'm really new to skating and I actually just started a week ago. I think I've been doing pretty well, but one issue I've noticed is I'm terrible at stopping with my left foot (I'm a righty). I'm pretty decent at stopping with my right foot on the outside, but with my left it's just a giant pile of suck. I can barely do it at a slow speed. I learned how to do crossover the other day and with those, my left side is basically 95% as good as my right so it's not that I'm completely incapable of using my non-dominant side, but for some reason I can't stop. I think it might have to do with the fact that when I stop I put a lot of pressure on my right skate, and it ends up kind of digging into the ice so I actually stop, but when I'm trying to do it with the left, I'm not putting as much pressure on my left skate and it just ends up gliding over the ice I end up turning instead of stopping. Any pointers?
I am skating for about a year now and still suck stopping on my left. It stinks.

Malarowski is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-12-2013, 06:09 PM
  #567
Terry Yake
Registered User
 
Terry Yake's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Country: United States
Posts: 2,367
vCash: 500
i've been playing on and off for the past 5-6 years and still can't fully stop on my right foot

which i find weird since i'm right handed and right footed. stopping on my left is like second nature but i just can't do a good stop on my right

Terry Yake is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-12-2013, 08:29 PM
  #568
Sureshotte
Thumbs up, soldier!
 
Sureshotte's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: CA
Country: United Kingdom
Posts: 922
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pohlow View Post
Looking to buy my first ice hockey stick. If I hold my right hand at the bottom of the shaft, and my left hand at the top of the knob, do I need a right handed or left handed stick? (I'm right handed) I know it seems like a damn obvious answer (right handed get the right handed stick), but before I spend the money on a stick I want a straight answer x.x
Quote:
Originally Posted by nullterm View Post
Then you will shoot right.

Just think of which side of your body the puck would be on naturally. Left side, left shot. Right side, right shot.

...

Some food for thought, if you are about to learn anyways from step 0, and are right handed, then maybe consider having your right hand on top. It may take a bit longer to learn shooting, but stick handling will come more naturally.

Your top hand is actually the one that does most of the stick/puck control. The bottom hand is more about just supporting the stick and applying force for shots, which doesn't require alot of dexterity.

I'm right handed, shoot right, so dominant hand down on the stick. And I'm assbackwards. Kinna wish I learned the other way for better puck control, but too late to turn back now.
I'm right-handed and glad I stuck with shooting left. It's kinda frustrating in the beginning as your shot sucks, but persevere, gain some strength and learn good technique and I think it's worth the trade-off, especially if you're just starting out. Stickhandling is just so much easier with your dominant hand.

Playing lefty now feels absolutely natural, despite the fact I'm right-whatever in pretty much every other sport, and my shot is gradually improving to the point where I probably couldn't shoot as well with a right-handed stick. If you find you can't get a lot of strength in your shot initially, go for a lower flex or intermediate stick instead.

Sureshotte is online now   Reply With Quote
Old
09-13-2013, 09:38 AM
  #569
TickleMeYandle
Not so fast,
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Country: Jamaica
Posts: 1,261
vCash: 500
After skating for 18 months on the bottom of the line Reeboks (which I liked just fine - but I didn't want to spend a ton in case I didn't stick with it) I got myself some nice skates. RBZ 100s.

Sure, I'm not a great skater or even a good one - so some of the features are certainly going to be lost on me. But I told the guy at the LHS that if they would last me a while, it would be worth it.

It was so, so worth it. They fit like slippers, molded to my feet perfectly. And the turning. Oh, the turning. I can't believe how much more tightly I can turn without changing any of my technique. I've only been using them for a week but I love them. Worth every penny.

TickleMeYandle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-13-2013, 10:13 AM
  #570
AntsSheffield
Registered User
 
AntsSheffield's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Country: United Kingdom
Posts: 170
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clownquestion View Post
And the turning. Oh, the turning. I can't believe how much more tightly I can turn without changing any of my technique. I've only been using them for a week but I love them. Worth every penny.
Is it the added rigidity too? I switched from cheap CCMs to $449 Grafs recently. The CCMs were pretty flimsy and flexible; the Grafs are like hooves on me and turning is like being on rails in comparison.

AntsSheffield is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-13-2013, 10:30 AM
  #571
TickleMeYandle
Not so fast,
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Country: Jamaica
Posts: 1,261
vCash: 500
The rigidity is nice. I had looked at the 70s and 80s but noticed a marked difference in strength in the 100s.

TickleMeYandle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-13-2013, 11:50 AM
  #572
AIREAYE
Moderator
 
AIREAYE's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Country: China
Posts: 3,322
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by AntsSheffield View Post
Is it the added rigidity too? I switched from cheap CCMs to $449 Grafs recently. The CCMs were pretty flimsy and flexible; the Grafs are like hooves on me and turning is like being on rails in comparison.
Get your Grafs profiled. Too much blade on the ice restricts mobility, agility and turning.

AIREAYE is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-13-2013, 12:17 PM
  #573
AntsSheffield
Registered User
 
AntsSheffield's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Country: United Kingdom
Posts: 170
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by AIREAYE View Post
Get your Grafs profiled. Too much blade on the ice restricts mobility, agility and turning.
I meant like being on rails in a good way Like I can feel all the way from the ice, thru my heel, totally locked.

AntsSheffield is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-13-2013, 12:24 PM
  #574
AIREAYE
Moderator
 
AIREAYE's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Country: China
Posts: 3,322
vCash: 500
Haha, you made it sound like you were trying to maneuver when secured, which isn't a nice thing lol.

AIREAYE is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-17-2013, 04:57 PM
  #575
Islesfan24
Registered User
 
Islesfan24's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Nassau County
Posts: 97
vCash: 500
By a beginner, for beginners.

Hey all!

So it has been awhile since I've posted last but if you remember, I am the kid who asked about equipment, being a first time player in my junior year of HS? Anyways, I started skating last year after dropping about 250 dollars on equipment, and am now practicing with my high school team.

Before I do my little tips thing, just let me say thank you to the community here for believing in me and not caring about my age to get started. With hard work, you can really accomplish anything.

So I thought it would be cool for fellow beginners to post some tips that they quickly picked up while learning. Here are mine!

1. Become friends with the staff at your local rink. I am fortunate enough to live 2 minutes away from my rink, and I would come down after school for an hour when nobody is there, and just pop my head in before I paid. Now, they let me skate for free.

2. Buy everything used except a helmet and skates. The helmet is extremely important! Your head is precious cargo and should not be protected by a cheap piece of plastic. As for skates, start with a lower model, I skate with Bauer Vapor x2.0's, and they do the job.

3. Don't be afraid to ask your coach or friends to help you learn. Have no shame in being a beginner. I earned a spot on the team because of my work ethic, not because of my skill. The coaches admire me for being the hardest worker on the ice. Grind it out beginners!

4. Lastly, enjoy it. You are now a hockey player. The minute your skate caresses that ice, know that you are doing something that only a select few have the chance to do.

When I am on the ice, its the most fun time in my life. I love playing hockey and am looking forward to doing so in college just for fun. Thanks guys!

Islesfan24 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Forum Jump


Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:16 PM.

monitoring_string = "e4251c93e2ba248d29da988d93bf5144"
Contact Us - HFBoards - Archive - Privacy Statement - Terms of Use - Advertise - Top - AdChoices

vBulletin Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
HFBoards.com is a property of CraveOnline Media, LLC, an Evolve Media, LLC company. 2014 All Rights Reserved.