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Old
09-07-2013, 12:50 PM
  #26
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09-08-2013, 01:45 PM
  #27
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Science (Fiction) Curation @ National Air & Space museum

http://blog.nasm.si.edu/restoration/...ip-enterprise/

Interesting look at the curation of the (original) Star Trek USS Enterprise in the National Air & Space museum.

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09-08-2013, 09:15 PM
  #28
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I could see the launch, it was pretty cool.

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09-12-2013, 08:45 PM
  #29
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NASAVoyager 12:46pm via Twitter for Mac I'm @NASAVoyager, now in #interstellar space. Ask me anything! Today Sept 12 3pm PT, 6pm ET, 2200 UTC ***********/r/IAmA/


http://www.nasa.gov/press/2013/septe...ger-spacecraft

http://www.nasa.gov/press/2013/septe...rstellar-space

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09-13-2013, 12:17 AM
  #30
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http://news.discovery.com/space/spac...mkcpgn=rssnws1

Headline: Space frog sacrifices for LADEE launch

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09-13-2013, 06:05 PM
  #31
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NOVA: Ground Zero Supertower (Season 41, episode 1)

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/tech/gr...upertower.html

Interesting look at the technology used to make a "safer" replacement World Trade Center 1 tower (super concrete, design), and the Ground Zero memorial and museum (with many architectural items from the debris of WTC North and South towers to be displayed).

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09-13-2013, 09:05 PM
  #32
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http://www.nasa.gov/content/ladee-pr...ver-1-complete

Perigee maneuver 1 complete

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10-09-2013, 11:35 PM
  #33
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NOVA: Superstorm Aftermath S41/E02

Watching NOVA episode on Superstorm Sandy aftermath.

And looking at the potential of future surges impacting "normal" life.

One thing that strikes me, having lived through the 1989 Loma Prieta quake (which impacted credit card processing nation wide as the processing centers were located in San Francisco), is that so many infrastructures did not have (enough) protection from the water.

Will we have to become like the Netherlands and build massive dikes/levies to keep the water out? But with what cost? Enough to compensate for lack of coastal views?

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01-20-2014, 08:43 PM
  #34
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Astronomers find evidence Milky Way grew 'inside out'

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CAMBRIDGE, England, Jan. 20 (UPI) -- European astronomers say new evidence suggests the Milky Way may have formed from the inside out, expanding out from the center.

New observations using a European Southern Observatory telescope in Chile suggests older stars inside the Solar Circle -- the orbit of our sun around the center of the Milky Way, which takes roughly 250 million years to complete -- are far more likely to have high levels of magnesium, suggesting this area contained more stars that "lived fast and died young" in the past.

Tracking the amount of chemical elements in a star other than hydrogen and helium -- the two elements comprising most stars -- allows a determination of how rapidly different parts of the Milky Way were formed, the astronomers said.
http://www.upi.com/Science_News/2014...0551390262227/

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01-29-2014, 08:38 AM
  #35
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Space may have stunning long-term effects on Astronaut health : Report

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A new report from the New York Times says the human body is not prepared for life in space. The challenges human beings would face in space could lead to long-term problems.

According to the report, humans “did not evolve to live in space.” The article describes what astronauts experience while in space. It quotes NASA astronaut Mark E. Kelly, who took part in four shuttle missions, and lists the problems encountered by astronauts Michael Barratt, from NASA, and Robert Thirsk, from the Canadian Space Agency, in 2009.

“Your head actually feels bloated,” said Mark E. Kelly, a retired NASA astronaut of four space shuttle missions. “It kind of feels like you would feel if you hung upside down for a couple of minutes.” Those symptoms led some to consider artificial gravity rooms, created by spinning the
http://canadajournal.net/science/spa...ort-3390-2014/

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Old
01-29-2014, 09:41 AM
  #36
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We've known this for a while.

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Old
01-29-2014, 08:44 PM
  #37
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Yeah, as a species we won't be ready for longterm space habitation until we can figure out artificial gravity.

Plants need sun. Fish need water. Earth-based life needs gravity.

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02-01-2014, 01:14 AM
  #38
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Study: Solar system full of 'rogue' asteroids

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(CNN) -- If you want to find an asteroid, the region between Mars and Jupiter is a great place to look. That area where asteroids hang out is called the main asteroid belt

A study in the journal Nature throws a new light on this strip of our solar system, where most of the asteroids in our solar system reside. Whereas scientists once believed that these asteroids formed more or less in place, new modeling suggests they have been scattered all over.

Scientists believe "the asteroid belt is a melting pot of bodies that formed all over the solar system," said Francesca DeMeo, lead study author and an astronomer at the Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics.
http://www.cnn.com/2014/01/30/tech/i...udy/index.html

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02-15-2014, 04:52 PM
  #39
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Asteroid cam: Near earth flyby Feb 18

http://www.space.com/24704-asteroid-...y-webcast.html


stop watching the Olympics, start watching asteroid.

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Old
03-05-2014, 11:45 AM
  #40
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Asteroid to Pass Between Earth and Moon Today

NASA ‏@NASA 3m Asteroid will safely pass closer than moon. Closest approach from Earth at ~4pm ET today: http://www.nasa.gov/jpl/asteroid/asteroid-2014-DX110-20140304/index.html#.UxdeURBnh7w … pic.twitter.com/GRA8DJpoX6



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Old
03-05-2014, 12:29 PM
  #41
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Astronomers adapting as cities shift to LED street lights

http://sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com/201...a-astronomers/

Light pollution. Major impacts for astronomers. Old yellow fixtures could be "filtered out", but LED fixtures contain "all colors" in their white.

Near San Jose, Mt Hamilton's Lick Observatory is changing from visible spectrum to help alleviate the change.

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03-05-2014, 04:37 PM
  #42
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The moon has got to stop missing these blocking assignments, Earth is gonna get sacked.


On a serious note, I have often wondered about all that. I've seen a theory that the moon has saved Earth's bacon (as well as all life on earth) many times by "diving" in front of asteroids.

But, the moon is slowly pulling away. Does the increased distance make the moon less effective as a shield?

I suppose I should spend some time with google to see if I can dig up a history of the moon's orbit, to see just how much it has changed.


Edit: From what I can gather the moon moves 22mm away from earth per year, making for 13,640km in the last 620 million years. I have no idea what to do with this newfound knowledge, or draw any conclusions from it to answer my question

Edit 2: Actually, I guess it would be pretty easy to figure out how many days it took to orbit the Earth, since I assume a shorter orbital period gives the moon more chances to clear out asteroids in our path? That would have to assume the moon's orbital speed hasn't changed and I have no idea about that.


Last edited by Beef Invictus: 03-05-2014 at 04:47 PM.
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Old
03-07-2014, 11:29 AM
  #43
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All-Purpose Astronomy Thread

Astronomy is a natural science that is the study of celestial objects (such as moons, planets, stars, nebulae, and galaxies), the physics, chemistry, and evolution of such objects, and phenomena that originate outside the atmosphere of Earth, including supernovae explosions, gamma ray bursts, and cosmic background radiation. A related but distinct subject, cosmology, is concerned with studying the universe as a whole

Historically, astronomy has included disciplines as diverse as astrometry, celestial navigation, observational astronomy, and the making of calendars, but professional astronomy is nowadays often considered to be synonymous with astrophysics.

Astronomy is not to be confused with astrology, the belief system which claims that human affairs are correlated with the positions of celestial objects.

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03-07-2014, 11:33 AM
  #44
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Blackholes are rapidly spinning

We now know a little more about black holes.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0305135456.htm

Quote:
By measuring the spin of distant black holes researchers discover important clues about how these objects grow over time. If black holes grow mainly from collisions and mergers between galaxies, they should accumulate material in a stable disk, and the steady supply of new material from the disk should lead to rapidly spinning black holes. In contrast, if black holes grow through many small accretion episodes, they will accumulate material from random directions. Like a merry go round that is pushed both backwards and forwards, this would make the black hole spin more slowly.

The discovery that the black hole in RX J1131 is spinning at over half the speed of light suggests this black hole, observed at a distance of six billion light years, corresponding to an age about 7.7 billion years after the Big Bang, has grown via mergers, rather than pulling material in from different directions.

The ability to measure black hole spin over a large range of cosmic time should make it possible to directly study whether the black hole evolves at about the same rate as its host galaxy. The measurement of the spin of the RX J1131-1231 black hole is a major step along that path and demonstrates a technique for assembling a sample of distant supermassive black holes with current X-ray observatories

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Old
03-08-2014, 05:31 PM
  #45
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http://tvbythenumbers.zap2it.com/201...cosmos/243144/

New series "Cosmos" premieres 3/9 on Fox channels, President Obama to make series introduction.

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03-16-2014, 11:39 PM
  #46
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http://www.nature.com/ngeo/journal/v.../ngeo2097.html

Per abstract (of pay-to-view study), planet Mercury has shrunk more than "cooling metal spheres" expected to. By up to 7km (rather than the estimated 0.3km+).

This theory is based on pre-plate techtonics, or a single "plate".

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Old
03-17-2014, 12:03 AM
  #47
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LadyStanley View Post
http://www.nature.com/ngeo/journal/v.../ngeo2097.html

Per abstract (of pay-to-view study), planet Mercury has shrunk more than "cooling metal spheres" expected to. By up to 7km (rather than the estimated 0.3km+).

This theory is based on pre-plate techtonics, or a single "plate".
Cool. Single plate? Like a crumpling paper ball?

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Old
03-17-2014, 07:40 AM
  #48
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Major announcement today.

http://www.businessinsider.com/harva...scovery-2014-3

Gravity Waves? The last untested hypothesis of Einstein is one guess.

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03-17-2014, 11:47 AM
  #49
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You know Einstein was pretty smart when 80 years later we're still testing his theories.

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Old
03-21-2014, 09:01 PM
  #50
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