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Struggling with Shot on Ice

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10-05-2013, 04:18 PM
  #1
nwharris74
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Struggling with Shot on Ice

Hello all,
I'm having problems with my wristshot on ice. On dryland with a shooting pad, I can get them off with no problems. I've got the weight transfer down, my aim is OK, and I think I've got some velocity, and reasonable technique. Once I'm on the ice, everything seems to fall apart. I'm not sure if it's the balance, or the height difference, or what. It may be as easy as spending more time shooting and less time working on skating when I am on the ice. Unfortunately, life does not provide many opportunities to hit the ice as often as I'd like. Mostly just for games. Any suggestions or pointers would be rad.

Thanks!!

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10-05-2013, 05:58 PM
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Steelhead16
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Originally Posted by nwharris74 View Post
Hello all,
I'm having problems with my wristshot on ice. On dryland with a shooting pad, I can get them off with no problems. I've got the weight transfer down, my aim is OK, and I think I've got some velocity, and reasonable technique. Once I'm on the ice, everything seems to fall apart. I'm not sure if it's the balance, or the height difference, or what. It may be as easy as spending more time shooting and less time working on skating when I am on the ice. Unfortunately, life does not provide many opportunities to hit the ice as often as I'd like. Mostly just for games. Any suggestions or pointers would be rad.

Thanks!!
Are you using the same size stick both on and off the ice? Are you having issues on the ice standing still or moving or both? I can give you some tips when I have a little more to go on. What is happening to your shot? Does it flutter or just stay on the ice? Does it have any velocity? Does it at least go where you are aiming it?

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10-05-2013, 07:07 PM
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nwharris74
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Well, initally I was using a shorter stick when shooting on dryland but the curve was different so I started using my backup stick for ice to get more used to the curve. My shot basically has no power and I can't get much lift when desired. Doesn't matter if I'm moving or not.

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10-05-2013, 08:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nwharris74 View Post
Well, initally I was using a shorter stick when shooting on dryland but the curve was different so I started using my backup stick for ice to get more used to the curve. My shot basically has no power and I can't get much lift when desired. Doesn't matter if I'm moving or not.
to get desired lift with your wrist shot follow through with your stick to the point where you aim your stick blade where you want it shot. if you take a wrist shot and only follow through to your ankle height you aren't going to go bar down.

as for power i guess i would suggest transferring your weight forward with the momentum of moving your puck forward. depends what you were shooting off of too dryland to on ice, there is a bit more friction with ice especially when it's wet compared to some outside surfaces. would suggest working out those forearms to for power.

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10-06-2013, 03:18 PM
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hockeyisforeveryone
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I also think it easier to shoot on dry land, especially backhanders. The increased friction (of a practice pad) allows an extra moment to load the stick and get into/under the puck properly.

On ice it is so slick the puck wants to slip away before you can release. Try letting the shot off earlier, meaning your motion will be quicker. Don't let it get too far in front or away from you.

I've been working really hard lately keeping the puck further behind my front foot and closer to my body when shooting. In the past I've been leaning too far over and out, losing my balance on the front foot. When the puck is tighter into my wheelhouse I feel upright and able to get more of a full twist at the hips and follow through.

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10-06-2013, 04:41 PM
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Steelhead16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nwharris74 View Post
Well, initally I was using a shorter stick when shooting on dryland but the curve was different so I started using my backup stick for ice to get more used to the curve. My shot basically has no power and I can't get much lift when desired. Doesn't matter if I'm moving or not.
Well by using an ice stick off ice you are practicing and getting good you are using a drastically different lie than when you are on the ice. That may be problem #1. I would suspect that you are getting a lot more leg drive off the ice than you are on the ice which will drastically reduce your power. On the ice you need to really drive off the toe of your trailing foot. Also make sure you are getting full extension in both directions of your shooting motion and also a good wrist snap.
Easiest way to practice on the ice is to face parallel to the boards and if you can stand on the blue line for a refernce point all the better. Take the puck as far back as you can reach without turning your hips (your palm facing down) weight on your inside edge of the toe of your back foot. As you move the puck forward transfer your weight forward and let your shoulders turn but not your hips (turning your hips will take away your power). Transition your palm position from palm down to palm facing the the target and as your stick crosses your front foot feel the puck move from the heel of your stick to the toe. As you finish the motion you need to make a flicking motion with your wrist with your palm facing about 10:00 and then snapping back to palm down, knuckles up and most of your weight on your front foot with your front foot still parallel to the boards. Finish with your stick blade pointing at your target.
I like to have guys stand on the blue line so you have a reference point as to how accurate you are shooting the puck.
Start with working on the power and then work on lifting the puck by moving your bottom hand down the shaft of your stick.
Hope that helps. Good luck.

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10-06-2013, 07:27 PM
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JoeCool16
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Have you thought about getting some pledge and making whatever shooting pad you have nice and glossy? It'll be closer to ice and maybe your issue is just not enough practice in that context, rather than something lost in the technique transfer!

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10-06-2013, 08:07 PM
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Silence Of The Plams
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Practice Practice. Lot of it. My shot sucked on ice for a long time and still isn't that great unless I go hulk mode. Steelhead has awesome advice.

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10-06-2013, 08:32 PM
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thevil
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Originally Posted by Guess What View Post
Practice Practice. Lot of it. My shot sucked on ice for a long time and still isn't that great unless I go hulk mode. Steelhead has awesome advice.
This, is exactly what you need to do.

I have been on the ice with a stick and pucks about 8 times now, and by just sitting there shooting for a while I now can get a pretty wicked shot off. So just keep on practicing, and you'll get it.

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10-06-2013, 08:55 PM
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Originally Posted by Guess What View Post
Practice Practice. Lot of it. My shot sucked on ice for a long time and still isn't that great unless I go hulk mode. Steelhead has awesome advice.
Ditto. I always though that I was shooting alright, but as I shot more on the ice, an got some feedback from teammates, I found out I wasn't loading my stick as much as I thought. Also, I was more or less flipping the puck at the net by starting myshot infront of me, instead of starting with the puck a bit behind me.

It's not a laser, but it's a fairly decent shot now (says my buddy who plays goalie) and I know I can pretty much put it where I want it... the tricky thing for me now is slapshots

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10-06-2013, 09:37 PM
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Steelhead16
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Originally Posted by kolankosf View Post
Ditto. I always though that I was shooting alright, but as I shot more on the ice, an got some feedback from teammates, I found out I wasn't loading my stick as much as I thought. Also, I was more or less flipping the puck at the net by starting myshot infront of me, instead of starting with the puck a bit behind me.

It's not a laser, but it's a fairly decent shot now (says my buddy who plays goalie) and I know I can pretty much put it where I want it... the tricky thing for me now is slapshots
Your slap shot issue may be the same as you had with the wrist shot before. Most people play the puck too far forward. Play it on the back foot side of halfway in your stance and try and hit the ice an inch or two behind the puck to load flex in your stick. Your follow through is more important than your windup. You can windup between waist and shoulder height and still have plenty of power. Your follow through will determine your accuracy. And I don't recommend taking slap shots that go higher than knee height. You will rarely score on a clean slap shot unless you have a cannon for a shot so provide your teammates with rebounds and deflection chances.

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10-06-2013, 09:49 PM
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Pual Statsny
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I had a problem compensating for balance on ice by tucking my top hand elbow (I'm right handed, so my left elbow) in when I shot. It's important to for blade control and follow through that your elbow stay out.

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10-07-2013, 09:41 AM
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Jarick
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There's a lot of good advice here. What flex stick are you using and how tall is it when you are in bare feet (up to your chin, nose, eyes, etc)?

Here's a thread I started with some videos and advice on shooting, might be helpful.

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10-07-2013, 04:01 PM
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nwharris74
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Thanks everyone for all the helpful tips. I think it's just going to be something I dedicate time to on the ice.

The sticks I use on the ice go just below mouth level with skates on. I have both a 77 and an 85 flex. One is a Kane and the other is a Hedman. They are both very similar as far as curve goes. The stick I use at home in the driveway is also a 85 flex but it's cut down some. Also it's a Stastny curve. That's one of the reasons I started using the Kane curve in the driveway as to have a closer feel to what I'm using on the ice.

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10-07-2013, 05:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nwharris74 View Post
Thanks everyone for all the helpful tips. I think it's just going to be something I dedicate time to on the ice.

The sticks I use on the ice go just below mouth level with skates on. I have both a 77 and an 85 flex. One is a Kane and the other is a Hedman. They are both very similar as far as curve goes. The stick I use at home in the driveway is also a 85 flex but it's cut down some. Also it's a Stastny curve. That's one of the reasons I started using the Kane curve in the driveway as to have a closer feel to what I'm using on the ice.
One other thing, make sure you have the proper flex stick for your size. How tall are you? Weight? You don't have to answer that, but keep in mind an 85 flex cut down can very quickly become a 100 flex. That's a pretty damn stiff stick. I'm about 165 pounds and I still use intermediate sticks, 67 flex! Love it.

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10-07-2013, 05:42 PM
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Bure All Day
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it's all in the wrists, gotta learn to snap with your lower hand just before release point

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10-08-2013, 02:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steelhead16 View Post
Your slap shot issue may be the same as you had with the wrist shot before. Most people play the puck too far forward. Play it on the back foot side of halfway in your stance and try and hit the ice an inch or two behind the puck to load flex in your stick. Your follow through is more important than your windup. You can windup between waist and shoulder height and still have plenty of power. Your follow through will determine your accuracy. And I don't recommend taking slap shots that go higher than knee height. You will rarely score on a clean slap shot unless you have a cannon for a shot so provide your teammates with rebounds and deflection chances.
This is a key piece of advice if you are playing lower level hockey like I do. I do not bend my knees very well.. I am an older guy, with stiff knees, and all sorts of other excuses, but I just do a lousy job of trusting my knees to bend and lean in to a shot. However, I can still generate a decent velocity shot that goes about 18 inches off the ice. This ends up being at just about the top of the pad level, creates a lot of rebound chances, and is right in that gap goalies hate. I would rather have a accurate shot there then a random bar down if I had to make a choice. Although, having both would be nice.

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