HFBoards

Go Back   HFBoards > General Hockey Discussion > The Rink
Mobile Hockey's Future Become a Sponsor Site Rules Support Forum vBookie Page 2
The Rink For the not so ready for prime-time players, coaches, referees, and the people that have to live with them. Discuss experiences in local leagues, coaching tips, equipment, and training.

shooting with the wrong hand

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old
10-15-2013, 06:00 AM
  #26
Fanned On It
Registered User
 
Fanned On It's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: New York
Country: United States
Posts: 1,885
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Propane Nightmares View Post
It's all about comfort, when a kid picks up a pen/pencil/crayon for the first time they will use the hand that feels more natural, for some reason that happens to be the right hand for a majority of people. I think trying to decipher which is the "right" way to hold a hockey stick based on which hand is dominant is over-thinking things too much. Let the kid pick up a stick and see which way they automatically hold it.

And I agree it's just all about practice. In the past it was considered weird to write with your left hand and kids were literally forced to use the right hand, they got used to it and grew up to be probably just as good writing with that hand than they would have been with the other. Rugby player Jonny Wilkinson is left footed but he practiced kicking with his right foot enough so that he would be able to use it in certain situations to make a good kick, and he scored a world-cup winning kick with that foot.
That is THE way to do it IMO. That's how I did it whenever I sold little kids sticks at my old pro-shop. My last comment about the dominant hand being on top was made because the OP was considering CHANGING the way his kid played to put the dominant hand at the bottom of the stick. He already naturally chose to have has dominant hand on top which is the way I find most people choose.

Fanned On It is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
10-15-2013, 03:13 PM
  #27
Ruhnie
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Dallas
Country: United States
Posts: 75
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by CunniJA View Post
One that I like to bring up in threads like the is that I hold jars with my right and twist caps off with my left.
I have been following numerous threads on this subject over the years, and this statement is the most profound thing I've ever read. You've made me realize I am not "doing it wrong". I too am right-handed and play all sports right-handed. I've tried several times to force myself to learn playing with a lefty stick, but I never feel like it's going to work. I open EVERYTHING with my left hand. Basically anything that requires a good grip, I use my left hand for. Having that hand on top just "feels" right to me, you know?

Ruhnie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
10-15-2013, 03:24 PM
  #28
sanityplease
Registered User
 
sanityplease's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Country: Canada
Posts: 876
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by rh71 View Post
One of my 5 year old sons writes and throws with his right arm but shoots and bats lefty. I am still not sure this is really the way I want him to develop (he's only starting hockey and has a weak shot regardless).

Why does it work for opposite-handed people in hockey if their stronger arm/hand is at the top, rather than the bottom (mid-shaft) where they can flex the stick harder?
Maybe he's Canadian.

Kidding, but it's pretty common up here (maybe more than shooting right). As far as I understand it's because most Canadian kids play hockey as their first sport & will put their dominant hand on the top of the stick. Then when they play golf etc, they will often shoot the same way. The top hand does most of the work while handling the puck.

sanityplease is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
10-15-2013, 05:48 PM
  #29
God
Free Citizen
 
God's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Vancouver
Country: Canada
Posts: 6,749
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Terry Yake View Post
is it just me or do most younger players today shoot righty compared to older generations? despite the fact that most people are right handed. i grew up assuming that if you're right handed then you're supposed to shoot lefty.

i watched a friend of mine's son play this weekend (14-16 year olds) and out of both teams there were only 2 lefties that i counted.
For Americans, the balance is majority right shots. For Canadians, it's majority left shots (except in BC).

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/16/sp...efty.html?_r=0
Quote:
Roughly 60 percent of the Easton hockey sticks sold in Canada are for left-handed shots, Mountain said. In the United States, he said, about 60 percent of sticks sold are for right-handed shots. Figures over the years from other manufacturers have put the ratio discrepancy between the two countries as high as 70 to 30.

..

Oddly, British Columbia — sometimes said to be the most American-like of the Canadian provinces — skews the other way. “The rest of the country goes 2 to 1 in favor of left sticks, but it’s reversed in B.C.,” said Marc Poirier, a customer service representative who handles Canadian orders for Warrior Sticks.

Europeans also tend to be left-handed shooters. The International Ice Hockey Federation does not keep figures by European nationality, the communications director Szymon Szemberg said. But, he said, lefty shooters have predominated. “For long spells, the great Soviet teams of the ’80s never had a player who shot right,” Szemberg said.

God is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
10-15-2013, 09:44 PM
  #30
Terry Yake
Registered User
 
Terry Yake's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Country: United States
Posts: 2,952
vCash: 500
very interesting stats

it could be, like someone said earlier, that hockey is not usually the first sport for american kids which means that most right handed people who start playing just assume they're supposed to shoot righty in hockey as a result of their right-handedness or because they bat righty in baseball

Terry Yake is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
10-16-2013, 01:54 AM
  #31
beth
Registered User
 
beth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Bellevue, WA
Country: United States
Posts: 539
vCash: 500
OMG he's 5. At that age, they should be given a straight stick to start off anyways. Dad, you are way overthinking this! lol!

I don't even ask whether kids want a righty or lefty stick. I just give them a stick and tell them to hold it like they're playing hockey, and then switch sticks if I've given them the wrong one.

When you're on the ice, you can always tell when a new kid (or new adult, really) has the wrong stick, because they'll one-hand it in the wrong hand.

beth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
10-16-2013, 06:37 AM
  #32
Fanned On It
Registered User
 
Fanned On It's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: New York
Country: United States
Posts: 1,885
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by beth View Post
OMG he's 5. At that age, they should be given a straight stick to start off anyways. Dad, you are way overthinking this! lol!

I don't even ask whether kids want a righty or lefty stick. I just give them a stick and tell them to hold it like they're playing hockey, and then switch sticks if I've given them the wrong one.

When you're on the ice, you can always tell when a new kid (or new adult, really) has the wrong stick, because they'll one-hand it in the wrong hand.
This is pretty much the bottom line. Give the kid a stick and say "hold it like you're playing hockey" and let him play that way.

Fanned On It is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
10-16-2013, 08:45 AM
  #33
rh71
Registered User
 
rh71's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 698
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruhnie View Post
I have been following numerous threads on this subject over the years, and this statement is the most profound thing I've ever read. You've made me realize I am not "doing it wrong". I too am right-handed and play all sports right-handed. I've tried several times to force myself to learn playing with a lefty stick, but I never feel like it's going to work. I open EVERYTHING with my left hand. Basically anything that requires a good grip, I use my left hand for. Having that hand on top just "feels" right to me, you know?
OP here. Opening jars is interesting because it's easier to push than pull and so your left hand is the one that would push it forward to open. Even though I'm righty I have loosened up jars that way many times.

As for my kid, I am fine if he plays lefty - I just wanted to be sure he's not shortchanging himself right from the get-go. Even the coach said "oh wow we actually have a lefty" and there turned out to be 3 lefties out of maybe 25+ kids. I take wristers mostly and with my stronger hand on the bottom for flex, I felt that was natural and works out. My kid of course isn't old enough to think that yet and so I started this thread.

On a separate note, I started late, learned by watching/playing, and always thought stickhandling was the bottom hand. A little hard for me to mentally use the top-hand (my weaker) to weave through during a game now. I think that's the difference for guys who make dangling look so smooth and simple. Instead for me it's chop-chop-chop.


Last edited by rh71: 10-16-2013 at 08:57 AM.
rh71 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
10-17-2013, 10:02 AM
  #34
McDugan
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 147
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Terry Yake View Post
very interesting stats

it could be, like someone said earlier, that hockey is not usually the first sport for american kids which means that most right handed people who start playing just assume they're supposed to shoot righty in hockey as a result of their right-handedness or because they bat righty in baseball
I think it has a lot to do with the core rotation that becomes second nature by virtue of repetition of the baseball swing, much more so than the semantics of "right handed" and "left handed" shots. I know for myself, as an Aemrican kid, I had already been swinging a bat for 2 or 3 years before I discovered hockey. Right-handed shot (even though I'm a righty) always felt best to me.

I'd love to have my dominant hand on top to take advantage of the increased control and dexterity but it just never works. I tried to learn to shoot left and practiced that way for a while on dry land. It went OK, but still felt a bit weird. Then I tried it on ice, and I literally could not do anything. I just felt off balance and strange.

I think it's because my muscle memory is so biased towards the counter-clockwise core twist that is involved in shooting, passing, etc. right handed.

McDugan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
10-17-2013, 11:09 AM
  #35
Jarick
Moderator
Doing Nothing
 
Jarick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: St Paul, MN
Country: United States
Posts: 24,316
vCash: 500
It's not a bad thing at all. I'm right hand dominant and shoot "lefty". That means my dominant hand is on top, which gives me an edge with stickhandling. And I have a very good shot.

Look at Sidney Crosby. He writes with his right hand and plays with a lefty stick. Working out alright for him.

My son is four. When he was one, I gave him a toy hockey stick. He would wave it with his right hand. When he started playing hockey on the floor, when he could barely walk, he held it left handed naturally. I was super conscious of this discussion so I let him do whatever he wanted, and he's always been a lefty.

When he was two, he broke a finger on his right hand and had to be in a cast for two months. Until then he would always write and do most things with his right hand. During that time he just did everything with his left and didn't fuss or even think about it. When the cast came off, he used both hands for about a week and then went back to his right hand.

I think some kids might switch back and forth but some others will have a real preference. If your kid switches back and forth, I'd go with a straight blade stick. My kid uses a curved stick because he never deviates.

Either way, at this age it's all about skating and having fun!

Jarick is online now   Reply With Quote
Old
10-17-2013, 11:13 AM
  #36
boo10
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Country: Canada
Posts: 65
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by rh71 View Post
I take wristers mostly and with my stronger hand on the bottom for flex, I felt that was natural and works out.
A stick is loaded more from shifting your weight than by hand/arm strength.

At the end of the day, whatever feels natural is correct. I'm right hand dominant, but play shoot/bat/golf left-handed. I can shoot both right and left and switch-hit, but can't golf right handed. When trying to stick handle right handed I look like I'm chopping wood!

boo10 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
10-17-2013, 11:26 AM
  #37
nycpunk1
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Medford, MA
Country: United States
Posts: 190
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by rh71 View Post
As for my kid, I am fine if he plays lefty - I just wanted to be sure he's not shortchanging himself right from the get-go.
More RH sticks are sold in the US, more LH sticks in Canada, as someone has already pointed out. But as far as I know, there is not a significant difference between the countries among NHL players.

One possible explanation for this disappearing difference is that all of those "extra" RH shots in the US are latecomers who shoot RH due to playing other sports first. Another explanation might be that the LH shots who are righthanded have an absolute edge over their RH-shooting counterparts that corrects the imbalance in the US naturally.

Either way, I wouldn't worry about shortchanging your kid.

nycpunk1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
10-17-2013, 11:33 AM
  #38
jazzykat
Registered User
 
jazzykat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 241
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by boo10 View Post
A stick is loaded more from shifting your weight than by hand/arm strength.

At the end of the day, whatever feels natural is correct. I'm right hand dominant, but play shoot/bat/golf left-handed. I can shoot both right and left and switch-hit, but can't golf right handed. When trying to stick handle right handed I look like I'm chopping wood!
On a somewhat off topic question: can someone provide links to a few good videos that show "how to load your stick". I am 200lbs and reasonably strong . I should be able to easily load a stick that is 85 flex (after it is cut) if my technique is good (which it is not) yet I have a lot of trouble loading it.

jazzykat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
10-17-2013, 11:59 AM
  #39
Ruhnie
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Dallas
Country: United States
Posts: 75
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzykat View Post
On a somewhat off topic question: can someone provide links to a few good videos that show "how to load your stick". I am 200lbs and reasonably strong . I should be able to easily load a stick that is 85 flex (after it is cut) if my technique is good (which it is not) yet I have a lot of trouble loading it.
Great question. Until the last couple of years I never heard the term "loading your stick" before. Now I have no idea if I'm shooting properly, as I don't consciously do anything to "load" during my shot. I know my stick must be flexing, but I wonder if I could get more out of it by understanding this part of the mechanics.

Ruhnie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
10-17-2013, 02:13 PM
  #40
boo10
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Country: Canada
Posts: 65
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzykat View Post
On a somewhat off topic question: can someone provide links to a few good videos that show "how to load your stick". I am 200lbs and reasonably strong . I should be able to easily load a stick that is 85 flex (after it is cut) if my technique is good (which it is not) yet I have a lot of trouble loading it.
Proper shooting technique is such a difficult thing to explain, especially since there is truly more than one "correct" way to do it. If I were to recommend one (former) NHL player to try to emulate for wrist shots, it would be Joe Sakic. He's not a very big guy by NHL standards, but has a laser for a shot. If you watch video of him, you'll see how much he leans over/forward to load up. This is the weight transfer I was referring to.

http://www.denverpost.com/portlet/ar...shipId=4768819

boo10 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
10-17-2013, 02:30 PM
  #41
Jarick
Moderator
Doing Nothing
 
Jarick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: St Paul, MN
Country: United States
Posts: 24,316
vCash: 500
How tall are you?

Check this thread for some advice

Jarick is online now   Reply With Quote
Old
10-17-2013, 04:21 PM
  #42
jazzykat
Registered User
 
jazzykat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 241
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jarick View Post
5' 9" but the stick is about 85 after cutting.

jazzykat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
10-17-2013, 04:45 PM
  #43
Jarick
Moderator
Doing Nothing
 
Jarick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: St Paul, MN
Country: United States
Posts: 24,316
vCash: 500
It started as a 75? Should be fine then.

Jarick is online now   Reply With Quote
Old
10-18-2013, 01:51 PM
  #44
Chrisinroch
Registered User
 
Chrisinroch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Vouvray
Country: United States
Posts: 408
vCash: 500
Interesting thread.

Chrisinroch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
10-18-2013, 01:59 PM
  #45
wondeROY
Registered User
 
wondeROY's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Missoula, Montana
Country: United States
Posts: 770
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sureshotte View Post
Put a broom in their hand and tell them to sweep the floor. Whichever hand they they naturally put at the top of the handle and side that they sweep on, they should probably stick with and apply to hockey.

I personally had massive doubts about my ability to play lefty, being right handed/footed in everything else. But after trying it out I definitely find it much more comfortable than shooting right. Being able to stickhandle with your dominant hand is a godsend, and you can always increase the strength in your left arm to improve shot power.
This ^^^^

Your opinion should have no barring on your child's shot hand, let his natural ability decide what he'll shoot with. There is a ton of variables and there is no science to it. You simply need to find what his natural choice is and let him go with it.

wondeROY is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
10-19-2013, 04:16 PM
  #46
Danglous
Registered User
 
Danglous's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Philly
Country: United States
Posts: 371
vCash: 500
Let him do it, it's actually better for him. I write and throw lefty but the day I picked up a baseball bat it just felt natural swinging righty. Also learned hockey right handed and boy am I really glad I did.

Having your dominant hand at the top of the stick will give your son better hands on the ice

Danglous is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
10-20-2013, 04:56 AM
  #47
Fanned On It
Registered User
 
Fanned On It's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: New York
Country: United States
Posts: 1,885
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by rh71 View Post
OP here. Opening jars is interesting because it's easier to push than pull and so your left hand is the one that would push it forward to open. Even though I'm righty I have loosened up jars that way many times.

As for my kid, I am fine if he plays lefty - I just wanted to be sure he's not shortchanging himself right from the get-go. Even the coach said "oh wow we actually have a lefty" and there turned out to be 3 lefties out of maybe 25+ kids. I take wristers mostly and with my stronger hand on the bottom for flex, I felt that was natural and works out. My kid of course isn't old enough to think that yet and so I started this thread.

On a separate note, I started late, learned by watching/playing, and always thought stickhandling was the bottom hand. A little hard for me to mentally use the top-hand (my weaker) to weave through during a game now. I think that's the difference for guys who make dangling look so smooth and simple. Instead for me it's chop-chop-chop.
Well there ya go.. stick-handling should ONLY be controlled by the top hand. The bottom hand does very little.

Fanned On It is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
10-20-2013, 02:12 PM
  #48
Silence Of The Plams
Zemgod
 
Silence Of The Plams's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Lancaster, NY
Country: United States
Posts: 18,204
vCash: 476
Right handed, shoot left GOAT

It's just preference for me. Has to do with what your dominant hand and eye do too I guess.

Silence Of The Plams is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
10-22-2013, 12:50 PM
  #49
pix530
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 28
vCash: 500
Ive seen many very young players who just started to use sticks.
Most of them will take stick how they like from day 1.

So if I'd have this ability to decide I would go with right-hand, its not usual and will give your son small additional benefit, especially when he will be older playing against experienced goalies.

PS: Both me and my son left-handed )

pix530 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
10-22-2013, 07:12 PM
  #50
boo10
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Country: Canada
Posts: 65
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by pix530 View Post
Ive seen many very young players who just started to use sticks.
Most of them will take stick how they like from day 1.

So if I'd have this ability to decide I would go with right-hand, its not usual and will give your son small additional benefit, especially when he will be older playing against experienced goalies.

PS: Both me and my son left-handed )
How do you figure that shooting right-handed is an advantage? I'm pretty sure the most prolific goal scorer of all time would disagree.

boo10 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Forum Jump


Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:17 AM.

monitoring_string = "e4251c93e2ba248d29da988d93bf5144"
Contact Us - HFBoards - Archive - Privacy Statement - Terms of Use - Advertise - Top - AdChoices

vBulletin Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
HFBoards.com is a property of CraveOnline Media, LLC, an Evolve Media, LLC company. ©2014 All Rights Reserved.