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Old
10-17-2013, 11:08 AM
  #76
Curtinho
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I play hockey once a week and I'm hoping to play a little more (and get a lot better). I'm a beginner and I only started last year. I think I'm in pretty good shape, but I'm small and I'd like to get a lot stronger/bigger. I have pretty good lower body stability and strength already, and I'm working on my skating.

Anyway, I'm about 5'10 and 150 lbs.

A big part of this is going to be eating a lot more. I know this because I've tried over time to gain weight and I've always had problems with it (even when I work out religiously).

Right now I'm looking at doing 1 minute kettlebell swings with a 35lb KB, pyramid designed pull-ups until I reach a max (so say, 1, then 2 up to about 10 right now and then down again), renegade rows with the 35lb KB and bulgarian split squats. I also have access to a goodlife gym at which I do bench press and deadlifting occasionally.

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10-17-2013, 02:32 PM
  #77
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cujomi View Post
I play hockey once a week and I'm hoping to play a little more (and get a lot better). I'm a beginner and I only started last year. I think I'm in pretty good shape, but I'm small and I'd like to get a lot stronger/bigger. I have pretty good lower body stability and strength already, and I'm working on my skating.

Anyway, I'm about 5'10 and 150 lbs.

A big part of this is going to be eating a lot more. I know this because I've tried over time to gain weight and I've always had problems with it (even when I work out religiously).

Right now I'm looking at doing 1 minute kettlebell swings with a 35lb KB, pyramid designed pull-ups until I reach a max (so say, 1, then 2 up to about 10 right now and then down again), renegade rows with the 35lb KB and bulgarian split squats. I also have access to a goodlife gym at which I do bench press and deadlifting occasionally.
Sounds almost exactly like me. I am 24yrs old, 5'10 and 158-160 lbs and have always had trouble putting on significant weight/muscle mass. I have recently attempted to put on weight again, so I thought I'd share what has helped me.

Yes, you will definitely have to eat more. But make sure your are upping your calorie intake with GOOD nutritional calories. What I mean is don't go eating 1000 calories of fried foods. You need lean protein, fruits, veggies etc. This article explains it pretty well. I also have been making the smoothie he mentions in the article every morning for the last month. I am not a big breakfast person so this helped me tremendously to increase my calorie intake. I also started making green smoothies at night as well to get in even more fruits and veggies. Now since I have only been doing this for the past few weeks, I don't expect to see significant weight gain yet, but I can tell you I don't feel like its a struggle to keep/maintain my weight. If I did not put any effort in to gaining weight, my natural weight would be around 150-155. But smoothies should definitely be your best friend!

As for weightlifting, you should be doing mostly exercise that work major muscle groups. Looking at your weightlifting routine, it seems like you pretty much do that. Although, I would recommend doing regular squats with a barbell as well. That should be in every weight gaining exercise routing IMO.

Btw how old are you? Reason I am asking is that when I was under 20, my metabolism was so fast that it was near impossible for me to put on any weight no matter how much I ate.

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10-18-2013, 11:24 AM
  #78
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scotty21 View Post
Sounds almost exactly like me. I am 24yrs old, 5'10 and 158-160 lbs and have always had trouble putting on significant weight/muscle mass. I have recently attempted to put on weight again, so I thought I'd share what has helped me.

Yes, you will definitely have to eat more. But make sure your are upping your calorie intake with GOOD nutritional calories. What I mean is don't go eating 1000 calories of fried foods. You need lean protein, fruits, veggies etc. This article explains it pretty well. I also have been making the smoothie he mentions in the article every morning for the last month. I am not a big breakfast person so this helped me tremendously to increase my calorie intake. I also started making green smoothies at night as well to get in even more fruits and veggies. Now since I have only been doing this for the past few weeks, I don't expect to see significant weight gain yet, but I can tell you I don't feel like its a struggle to keep/maintain my weight. If I did not put any effort in to gaining weight, my natural weight would be around 150-155. But smoothies should definitely be your best friend!

As for weightlifting, you should be doing mostly exercise that work major muscle groups. Looking at your weightlifting routine, it seems like you pretty much do that. Although, I would recommend doing regular squats with a barbell as well. That should be in every weight gaining exercise routing IMO.

Btw how old are you? Reason I am asking is that when I was under 20, my metabolism was so fast that it was near impossible for me to put on any weight no matter how much I ate.
I'm 25 -- in theory it's possible to gain weight always it's just a matter of outpacing your ability to burn calories (easier said than done sometimes). I know how it works in reality, but I still find it hard to eat enough food to counter-act the amount of exercise I get.

Still working hard at it though. I'm trying to work more specifically towards hockey now (hence the 1 minute intense KB swing sets separated by 1 - 2 minutes rest). I'd really like to break it down into like twice a week doing those coupled with one day of core/legs and one day of arms/back.

So like...

KB Swings
Pull-ups
Bench/push
Rows

KB Swings
Russian Twist
Bootstrappers
Bicycle Crunch
Bulgarian Split-squats

The only thing here for me is that I'm not sure I get a significant lower-back exercise which I think is important.

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10-18-2013, 11:43 AM
  #79
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Cujomi, another 10 years and you'll have no trouble gaining weight. ;-)

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10-18-2013, 06:14 PM
  #80
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Rest, recovery and replenish is just as, if not more, important than lifting weights itself.

Stretching is good, but I'd recommend a foam roller. Until you've rolled before, you'll never know what you're missing out on. It's sex, but on foam, especially if you're sore. I lift 3 days a week, but never on back to back days, even if it's a different muscle group. Your entire body needs rest.

Food, food and food. Healthy food, greens and fruits. Never ever miss leg day. You can't spell legendary without 'Leg Day', remember that!

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10-18-2013, 07:49 PM
  #81
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Keep in mind that sports training is different from traditional weight training routines. For instance, the body part split workout is popular but sometimes not suited to sports training.

Instead, perform movements based on movement where a lot of muscles are working to produce a specific sequence of movements. A lot of the exercises mentioned previously in this thread are great — Kettlebell swings (hip dominant explosive movement) and Bulgarian Split Squats (Knee dominant movement with hip extension).

Both the movements above are excellent for hockey because they put the joints and muscles through movements that you do on the ice.

For upper body, chopping/throwing exercises with medicine balls are great because they focus on rotational of power through the core.

As a variation to pull ups, do inverted rows (horizontal pull ups). Plyometric push ups are great for the pushing musculature in the chest but you'll have to work up to those.

Those guys serious about their training will eventually perform Olympic style power lifts. Here's a couple of the guys I trained doing some basic but really effective power clean exercises: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nSQlIvyj3qo

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10-18-2013, 09:11 PM
  #82
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I just do a simple weight routine with 12 lb dumbbells. I do that everyday, for about 10 minutes, and it works most everything except my legs, because then I cycle every Tuesday- Thursday, and sometimes on the weekends. Pretty simple. I have only been doing it for a little less than 2 weeks so I have yet to see any big results.

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10-18-2013, 10:31 PM
  #83
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I played hockey my whole life until I graduated HS and while I'm playing/skating less frequently, I've been working out consistently and there are still some hockey related exercises I incorporate that were very beneficial to me when I was playing/skating;

Jumping Squats - beneficial for explosiveness, I use a barbell with plates for 15-20 reps, but there are several different options and ways to do this and this video I found explains it well and gives you different options



Hockey Jumps - beneficial for balance, and also for explosiveness, but it simulates the motions you make as a skater, this is one of the exercises I've always found to me among the more helpful when I was playing consistently

(guy in this vid touches his back leg on the ground, try not to do so unless you absolutely have balance trouble while doing it)


Time/Reps: You can either do them for reps or timed, I prefer doing them for reps (40) because they take longer, and as a hockey player you of course want the endurance - either way take into account that an average hockey shift is 45-60 seconds so aiming for that amount of time+ is not a bad way to start.

Jumping Distance: I use 4 feet and you can use anything as markers so you know how far you have to jump each time and that most importantly, you are jumping consistent distances

Adding Variations: Over time you can add weight in some form to your body as you get the hang of it (weighted vest, dumbbells). I've added dumbbells in each hand while doing these as weighted vests aren't exactly cheap and because dumbbells are more accessible whether at home or the gym

While searching for a video for visual for this exercise, I actually came across this video as another variation of doing it, and now I'm pretty amped about trying it out , this is even better once you get the hang of it on flat ground for balance



Also, this is a 2 part series from a few years back I've always found of interest about the guys in the best shape in the league that I thought you guys might find of interest as well - for many of the players it includes some of their work out regimes

http://www.muscleprodigy.com/most-ja...arcl-1756.html
http://www.muscleprodigy.com/most-ja...arcl-1758.html

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10-18-2013, 10:51 PM
  #84
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Progression

Quote:
Originally Posted by thevil View Post
I just do a simple weight routine with 12 lb dumbbells. I do that everyday, for about 10 minutes, and it works most everything except my legs, because then I cycle every Tuesday- Thursday, and sometimes on the weekends. Pretty simple. I have only been doing it for a little less than 2 weeks so I have yet to see any big results.
At some point your muscles adapt to the weights and exercises so you can't do that routine indefinitely and expect great results. There must be a consistent challenge to the muscles otherwise no growth.

Mix up the exercises, increase reps, add weight, perform tougher variations. This may mean you can't work out everyday as you'll need some recovery time.

Also, depending on the nature of your cycling (how fast/long) that could work against major strength/mass increases.

You can actually get a great workout with bodyweight variations if you know how how to progress them.

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10-20-2013, 10:17 AM
  #85
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Originally Posted by TKSPT View Post
Instead, perform movements based on movement where a lot of muscles are working to produce a specific sequence of movements. A lot of the exercises mentioned previously in this thread are great Kettlebell swings (hip dominant explosive movement) and Bulgarian Split Squats (Knee dominant movement with hip extension).

Both the movements above are excellent for hockey because they put the joints and muscles through movements that you do on the ice.
TKSPT, I always see mention of Bulgarian Split Squats and forget to add it to my routine. I tried it last night and really liked them.

I'm curious though, I've been advised to work on single leg squats to help with some muscle imbalances and I really struggle with them. But the Bulgarian Split Squat feels really natural. How would you compare the two?

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10-20-2013, 08:38 PM
  #86
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wingman77 View Post
Hockey Jumps - beneficial for balance, and also for explosiveness, but it simulates the motions you make as a skater, this is one of the exercises I've always found to me among the more helpful when I was playing consistently

(guy in this vid touches his back leg on the ground, try not to do so unless you absolutely have balance trouble while doing it)


Time/Reps: You can either do them for reps or timed, I prefer doing them for reps (40) because they take longer, and as a hockey player you of course want the endurance - either way take into account that an average hockey shift is 45-60 seconds so aiming for that amount of time+ is not a bad way to start.

Jumping Distance: I use 4 feet and you can use anything as markers so you know how far you have to jump each time and that most importantly, you are jumping consistent distances

Adding Variations: Over time you can add weight in some form to your body as you get the hang of it (weighted vest, dumbbells). I've added dumbbells in each hand while doing these as weighted vests aren't exactly cheap and because dumbbells are more accessible whether at home or the gym

While searching for a video for visual for this exercise, I actually came across this video as another variation of doing it, and now I'm pretty amped about trying it out , this is even better once you get the hang of it on flat ground for balance

[/URL]
I'll save you my entire back story, but I was off ice for nearly two decades and decided sometime between January and April to join a men's league this fall. After all of the skating over those months I got together with a new teammate who is a martial arts instructor as well as a skating instructor. The biggest changes were focusing on legs ALONE one day in the gym. I do squats, extensions, curls, calves and add/abductors. Sometimes single-leg presses. Usually second workout after a game. The other days get a typical split with hockey jumps thrown in between sets. These have made a HUGE difference in my stride as well as my overall balance (I don't touch my back foot to the ground or I start over). Also, I've made a conscious effort to STRETCH. EVERYTHING. Again, it's something that I talked about with my teammate, though I had always stretched a little before skating and a little after my workouts. I now do a full routine whether I workout or not. I stretch everything on leg day. I stretch everything on chest day. Etc. I've considered yoga but the pants make my ass look fat. Seriously, the "fluidity" afforded by stretching is wonderful.

Moral of story? I LOVE hockey jumps and absolutely believe they have helped me. And STRETCH.

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10-20-2013, 11:01 PM
  #87
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Awesome post with lots of info but this is all I can take away from it:

Quote:
Originally Posted by sxHarr05 View Post
I've considered yoga but the pants make my ass look fat.
And I just googled for a yoga studio to join. Good thing I have a bony ass.

Agree with the stretching, though. Seriously, for anyone who spends any time watching hockey, you have time to stretch. Get off the couch and spend 30 minutes stretching. It's easy and well worth it.

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10-21-2013, 07:42 PM
  #88
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stickchecked View Post
Awesome post with lots of info but this is all I can take away from it:



And I just googled for a yoga studio to join. Good thing I have a bony ass.

Agree with the stretching, though. Seriously, for anyone who spends any time watching hockey, you have time to stretch. Get off the couch and spend 30 minutes stretching. It's easy and well worth it.
I get up at 5 every day. Start work at 6. Somewhere between 6:30 and 6:45 I can be found in the back of the warehouse touching my toes. Then on with the rest of my routine. I have a wonky neck/shoulder which can cause severe pain in my left arm if not watched (stretched daily and chiro every other week, and heavy work in the gym) and I've seen first hand what a bad back can do to someone. At 40 and just getting back into the game I'm not leaving anything to chance. I understand there are obviously injury risks, but I'll deal with calling out broken from a hit rather than calling out with a groin pull because I caught a rut. I stretch before work to limber up and get the blood/caffeine flowing. Also the typical before game and after gym. It's something that can be done anywhere, any time you feel the need/want.

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10-21-2013, 09:02 PM
  #89
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Hohoho, an HFB fitness thread

Coles notes:

Overtraining =

I sincerely doubt anyone ITT has experienced overtraining. No, not every workout will allow you to lift at 90%+ 1RM or set PRs whether for weight or reps. Feeling stale or sore or bad because you trained hard does not mean you've "overtrained," and so help me God if you use the term "CNS fatigue."

Hockey specific training:

Do a sensible full-body strength program with some added single-leg work and a focus on conditioning. Use of a bosu ball revokes your man-card. Anything popular such as 5/3/1, SS, any number of beginner 5x5 program is great. Learn to love the rear-foot elevated split-squat, and be sure to get on some hip-hinge movements since the majority of the power in your stride will come from your hips.

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10-22-2013, 01:00 AM
  #90
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Quote:
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TKSPT, I always see mention of Bulgarian Split Squats and forget to add it to my routine. I tried it last night and really liked them.

I'm curious though, I've been advised to work on single leg squats to help with some muscle imbalances and I really struggle with them. But the Bulgarian Split Squat feels really natural. How would you compare the two?
Bulgarian Split Squats are easier from the standpoint that they're not purely single leg exercises but they do engage the quads better than two legged varieties. There is also an element of the skating stride in the movement.

Also, Split Squats work the hips, glutes and hamstrings while increasing the range of motion of the hip joint (necessary for skating power).

Single leg (pistol-style) squats are more of a power exercise and tend to activate the quads more than the hips.
I love both exercises to be honest.

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10-22-2013, 01:31 AM
  #91
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fallsviewafro View Post
Hohoho, an HFB fitness thread

Coles notes:

Overtraining =

I sincerely doubt anyone ITT has experienced overtraining. No, not every workout will allow you to lift at 90%+ 1RM or set PRs whether for weight or reps. Feeling stale or sore or bad because you trained hard does not mean you've "overtrained," and so help me God if you use the term "CNS fatigue."

Hockey specific training:

Do a sensible full-body strength program with some added single-leg work and a focus on conditioning. Use of a bosu ball revokes your man-card. Anything popular such as 5/3/1, SS, any number of beginner 5x5 program is great. Learn to love the rear-foot elevated split-squat, and be sure to get on some hip-hinge movements since the majority of the power in your stride will come from your hips.
True — the BOSU ball thing can be bad idea. You're basically destabilizing your legs and losing power. Plyometric drills like lateral bounds require a powerful, fast push in the opposite direction upon landing. This whole process is compromised by jumping onto the BOSU ball.

As for hip hinge movements, Kettlebell Swings and Hip Thrusts are fantastic for developing explosiveness from the hips, glutes and hamstrings.


Last edited by TKSPT: 10-26-2013 at 04:08 PM.
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10-22-2013, 04:44 AM
  #92
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stickchecked View Post
Awesome post with lots of info but this is all I can take away from it:



And I just googled for a yoga studio to join. Good thing I have a bony ass.

Agree with the stretching, though. Seriously, for anyone who spends any time watching hockey, you have time to stretch. Get off the couch and spend 30 minutes stretching. It's easy and well worth it.
+1 to stretching and +1000000 to yoga.

I have a balance board, that I stand on and watch hockey on.

I also keep small weights at my desk that I lift with my non-mousing hand(I alternate).

I really admire guys who cut a slice out of there day to train, but there are also ways to combine some types of training with other every day activities.

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10-22-2013, 11:12 AM
  #93
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TKSPT View Post
As for hip hinge movements, Kettlebell Swings and Hip Thrusts are fantastic for developing explosiveness from the hips, glutes and hamstrings.
I like to see this. Right now the majority of my working out has been KB swings.

Do you think it's beneficial to go hard at KB swings in intervals? Say 60 seconds on of 'intense' KB swings and then a rest, then another 60 seconds, then a rest. Something to kind of simulate shifts?

Also do you have any other suggestions for non-leg/lower body related hockey exercises?

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10-22-2013, 05:31 PM
  #94
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cujomi View Post
I like to see this. Right now the majority of my working out has been KB swings.

Do you think it's beneficial to go hard at KB swings in intervals? Say 60 seconds on of 'intense' KB swings and then a rest, then another 60 seconds, then a rest. Something to kind of simulate shifts?

Also do you have any other suggestions for non-leg/lower body related hockey exercises?
A) I will address your second question first: Exercises that work the rotary core function are gold for hockey players. Use either a cable system or a medicine balls. You can do chops and lifts with both MB and cables. Both these methods will work the rotary core which increases stability and strength but also works the explosive rotating shooting motion.

The added advantage of medicine balls is that you can do explosive throwing movements. Examples of cables and MBs: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=noBEZ7jNy34 and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W7FLvrpL4iY. You can do MB exercises individually or with partners.

B) Yes — KB swings are awesome for interval conditioning/strength.

There are two ways to use KB swings:
  • Real heavy for strength development (powerlifters use these to train their deadlift).
  • Lighter for higher rep conditioning.

Of the two I recommend players use the latter most of the time.

Instead of pure intervals, you can get a great workout by using them in a three-exercise Metabolic Resistance Training (MRT) scheme. The effect is similar to intervals but you use more than one exercise.

For the 2nd exercise, use a movement that gives the previous muscles worked a bit of a break.

e.g.
Use a 20s:10s or 20s:20s work to rest ratio for this triset (do exercise 1 for 20s, rest 20s then do exercise 2...) Rest 30 seconds before repeating the sequence.

KB swings
Mountain climbers
Burpees

The great thing about this sequence is that it simulates hockey energy and muscle demands quite nicely. There's core activation and the legs get a thorough going over from several angles. Also, your heart rate is elevated which is why it is called metabolic training. Tinker with the work:rest ratio to suit your current fitness level. 20-30s tops for work time; between 10-30s of rest time.

Try it and see if you like it!


Last edited by TKSPT: 10-22-2013 at 05:48 PM.
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10-22-2013, 05:51 PM
  #95
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TKSPT View Post
e.g.
Use a 20s:10s or 20s:20s work to rest ratio for this triset. Rest 30 seconds then repeat the sequence.

KB swings
Mountain climbers
Burpees
So 3 sets of that would be 10 and a half minutes. Sounds good. Where do you structure this within an longer workout? Towards the beginning after warmup to get the body really working or at the end for the last gasp of energy?

I totally need to incorporate this stuff into my workouts.

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10-22-2013, 06:01 PM
  #96
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So 3 sets of that would be 10 and a half minutes. Sounds good. Where do you structure this within an longer workout? Towards the beginning after warmup to get the body really working or at the end for the last gasp of energy?

I totally need to incorporate this stuff into my workouts.
Conditioning is always last in the workout. Power/speed first, strength second, conditioning last. Typically the athletes I work with will focus on 1-2 things in a session but these guys are given a personalized program split into three phases over the off-season. Game conditioning is the focus for the final 4-6 weeks in the lead up to the start of a season.

Short answer is don't try and bite off too much in any one workout and split training demands over the week.

As an in-season conditioning workout, these mini MRT/interval ideas are excellent. Perform anywhere from 3-8 repeats. Reserve 8 for when you're preparing for the season and 3-5 as a normal scheme. Work them into a broader training regime. Listen to what your body is saying and don't exhaust yourself too much. It should be challenging and make you sweat, not collapse.


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04-25-2014, 03:55 PM
  #97
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It obviously depends what level of hockey you're playing at and what level you hope to play at with regards to what and how much training you do off ice.

I'm a pretty big guy and don't feel the need to do any strength work these days, but do a little bit of cardio (running), 45 minutes to an hour, two or three mornings a week.

Most of the guys I send to the ice don't end up on their backsides because they're too small or not strong enough, but because they're not strong or stable enough on their skates; it's skating thing, not a size or strength thing. The little guys that skate really well don't seem to have too many problems.

Not sure if this belongs in here or in the frustrations thread, but I get really bugged by the guys that turn up who are unfit and do nothing, not that they are unfit and do no training, but that they go on about it. 'Oh, I'm so unfit' or 'I need to do..'. Either do something or shut up. Doesn't stop them staying out longer than they are really up to.

Unless you're playing seriously competitively or have designs on such, a little running or something similar is all you need. Most people would probably obtain hugely more benefit from spending more time on skill work.

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