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Set plays for Beer league

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Old
11-08-2013, 02:29 PM
  #26
JaeTM
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I'm surprised at a lot of the answers here. Maybe it's because I play in an 18 and over league, and some of you talk like yours is like 30+ but my games are really competitive and my team goes out and tries to win. I wouldn't have fun having it any other way. I'm a competitor, and I want to win, even if it's at a low level. Like Jarick said, if I wasn't going to do that, then I'd just play pick up every weekend.

I've played my whole life, and have been coached at lower levels when I was younger, so I know the basics of the game. That being said, the majority of my teammates have not and they actually enjoy hearing what I have to say to them. I'm not a ****** about it and "coach" them like you guys are saying, but simply giving them advice on where to be, what to do during this play, etc. They do get out of position a lot, and it can be extremely frustrating when I'm standing next to the RW when I'm playing LW because he's just following the puck. But you just tell them what they need to do because when people just follow the puck you get stranded in your own zone for the majority of the game, which lets face it, sucks.

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11-08-2013, 02:46 PM
  #27
Canadiens1958
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Basics

My two cents(Canadian funds).

From the sound of it simply hit the markings for each position while respecting the arcs, angles and lanes.

The puck will get to you on offense allowing you to make plays and your defensive play will also become more effective.

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11-08-2013, 03:16 PM
  #28
Doctor No
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Has anyone mentioned this yet? Seems to work like a charm in my beer leagues.

Defensive faceoff to the left of the goaltender (works on both sides, but for the sake of the example...). Center wins draw back to defenseman. Meanwhile, right wing goes directly for the right boards at the blue line. Defenseman rings the puck around the zone (behind the net) to the winger, who now has at least a partial breakaway.

Of course, you'd better win the faceoff, or otherwise you're playing a man down for a few seconds.

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11-08-2013, 04:04 PM
  #29
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WOW. This thread barely moved at first and I check back in and it has exploded. Let me address some of the comments and see if I can bring it back under the tent a little.

I am not a maniacal guy who thinks his beer league is the NHL. My teammates are not either. We do play some teams that might think they are and they light us up by 7-8 goals every week for the most part. We are starting our third season together(25 game seasons) and have two guys with us that were not on the original team(formed from an adult clinic no less). The first thing we do every season is work out the beer rotation, then we worry about the actual schedule. Our priorities are in the right place, I assure you. The fact that we have stayed together shows... it is a tight locker room with guys on the same page... at least beer drinking wise:-)

At the same time, while we are all much better than we were a year ago, and while our team plays better than we did a year ago, we would like to step up and fix the things we don't do so well and be more competitive. Sorry to those of you who don't feel the same way, but we like to have fun, drink beer, and just play in competitive games -- win or lose. 7-2 games aren't that fun. We try to organize a practice once a month, and this summer we probably did 8 or so of them with another team. We could go out and swipe a couple former college guys and ringer up like everyone else and nobody would stop us from doing it. We would actually prefer to just learn how to play the game better though. And I mean we... the whole team is on board with a process of developing into better players and having more fun.

Perhaps, set plays was taking the description to far for some of you. What I was more interested in, and Jarick came pretty close on it, was just some basic situational responses where guys can KNOW what to do. When we win a draw in our own zone behind the net, it is a monkey f*ng a football. Guys are spinning around looking and watching the puck, not anticipating. As a group, if we actually knew there was a plan for how to handle some situations, then guys would know where they were expected to be and move with a purpose. Nobody is really looking to develop the left wing lock or anything, it was just to get an idea of how to layout some basic plays to get people thinking the right way and moving in the right direction. If we can get some of that to work, I think it would start to apply all over the ice. Perhaps I was foolish to think that an internet forum devoted to hockey and featuring a ton of guys who play, or have played, adult league hockey, might have been in this situation before. To all those that helped out, I appreciate the comments.

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Old
11-08-2013, 04:21 PM
  #30
Canadiens1958
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Have Fun

Here you go, a complete buffet by position, situation for various levels.

https://www.google.ca/?gws_rd=cr&ei=...sponsibilities

Now go and have fun.

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Old
11-08-2013, 05:18 PM
  #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JaeTM View Post
I'm surprised at a lot of the answers here. Maybe it's because I play in an 18 and over league, and some of you talk like yours is like 30+ but my games are really competitive and my team goes out and tries to win. I wouldn't have fun having it any other way. I'm a competitor, and I want to win, even if it's at a low level. Like Jarick said, if I wasn't going to do that, then I'd just play pick up every weekend.

I'm the same way as you are, and all my teams are as well. Your remark about age gets to me though. I can feel myself getting older just for saying that though

Anyway, I'm 31 and play in 3 open leagues with kids as young as 17 and some who play in Juniors in CAN/US and who have come from the NAHL. We even have some D1 players who come in from time to time in summer leagues. Some of the best players around are over 30, and they play in both the 30+ and open leagues. I don't play in the 30+ leagues because 99% of my teammates are far too young and I'd rather stay with them, but judging by the older folks who dominate the open leagues it's safe to say the competition is high everywhere at this rink.

I am basically a ringer on 2 of my 3 current teams, because neither can compete w/o me or someone else to fill the same role. They're playing in open leagues w/young guys who should have endless energy and drive, and here's ol' me kicking their *****...

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11-09-2013, 12:37 PM
  #32
The Tikkanen
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Is there any focus on off ice training or nutrition? I've found it's tough to tell guys where to go and what to do when they have a full fast food meal in their bulging guts. Playing sluggish hockey leads to break downs, turn overs and losses.

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11-09-2013, 01:12 PM
  #33
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Originally Posted by Tikkanen View Post
Is there any focus on off ice training or nutrition? I've found it's tough to tell guys where to go and what to do when they have a full fast food meal in their bulging guts. Playing sluggish hockey leads to break downs, turn overs and losses.
I'm in my forties and my competitive hockey days are long past. My idea of proper pre-game nutrition is "light" beer!

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11-09-2013, 01:15 PM
  #34
Doctor No
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Originally Posted by mistrhanky View Post
Perhaps I was foolish to think that an internet forum devoted to hockey and featuring a ton of guys who play, or have played, adult league hockey, might have been in this situation before.
I tried.

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11-09-2013, 01:52 PM
  #35
Terry Yake
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tikkanen View Post
Is there any focus on off ice training or nutrition? I've found it's tough to tell guys where to go and what to do when they have a full fast food meal in their bulging guts. Playing sluggish hockey leads to break downs, turn overs and losses.
i go jogging 4-5 times a week just to stay in shape since i only play twice a week at most

other than that, i can't tell you how many times i've eaten taco bell or a burger and fries right before a night game and ended up feeling like i'm going to lose it all right after a shift

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11-09-2013, 03:18 PM
  #36
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Originally Posted by Terry Yake View Post
i go jogging 4-5 times a week just to stay in shape since i only play twice a week at most

other than that, i can't tell you how many times i've eaten taco bell or a burger and fries right before a night game and ended up feeling like i'm going to lose it all right after a shift
There was a defenseman on my team a few seasons back that would play significantly better if he had a drink before the game. He'd go from being decent to our number 1 defenseman. It threw everything I knew about nutrition into disarray! I've never tried it myself, and I think I'll keep it that way

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11-09-2013, 03:20 PM
  #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Terry Yake View Post
i go jogging 4-5 times a week just to stay in shape since i only play twice a week at most

other than that, i can't tell you how many times i've eaten taco bell or a burger and fries right before a night game and ended up feeling like i'm going to lose it all right after a shift
That's my point. Coaching is nice, trying to get guys to buy into a system is also nice. If you're center is smoking a pack a day and your #1 Dman has a Munchie Meal in his stomach you're better off embracing what rec league hockey is=organized chaos.

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11-09-2013, 03:35 PM
  #38
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Not sure if anyone has said this yet, but :

Face off to the left of the goalie in your own zone. Win the draw back, have the second defenseman release from the front of the net, jump behind and move the puck d to d. As soon as the puck is dropped, have the winger on the boards go for a change in the close gate. At the same time, send another player from the far gate. Have the new player stretch across the ice, and have the d throw him a breakaway pass.

Might sound a little confusing, but it is amazing when it works. This only works in the 1st and 3rd periods (if you switch ends) and everyone on the ice and on the bench need to be on the same page

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11-09-2013, 08:30 PM
  #39
Ozz
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One that we do often when on the opposing goalie's left circle, is to have our center win it directly back to a Dman who then moves it to the other Dman or up to a winter for a one-timer in the slot. It works well.

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11-09-2013, 09:26 PM
  #40
Terry Yake
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Originally Posted by Tikkanen View Post
That's my point. Coaching is nice, trying to get guys to buy into a system is also nice. If you're center is smoking a pack a day and your #1 Dman has a Munchie Meal in his stomach you're better off embracing what rec league hockey is=organized chaos.
best thing about your post is that it sounds exactly like my team

except we're actually not too bad at all

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11-09-2013, 11:54 PM
  #41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Terry Yake View Post
best thing about your post is that it sounds exactly like my team

except we're actually not too bad at all
We have a guy on my team who does his best to try and coach guys. I appreciate the effort and I like playing with guys who put thought and effort into the game on and off the ice. I used to be the guy who would yell and scream and throw guys under the bus who I thought were detrimental to my teams chances of winning a championship. The funny part about it is I learned from one of the best players I ever played with that you can't coach or change attitudes of players who don't want to be coached or yelled at. The guy was built like Superman, a tremendous hockey player but his passion was playing the guitar, he wanted to be a country singer. Hockey was something he did for fun. So what I try to tell guys who want to run a military-like detail is that you need to learn people's personalities. Some guys won't react well to being dressed down, some guys will light a fire under them. Figure out what guys want, talk to the team and see if they want to run plays or if they want to be coached or if they're their just for fun and beer. Then ask for input on what everybody thinks you need to be better.

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11-10-2013, 01:50 AM
  #42
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Originally Posted by Tikkanen View Post
That's my point. Coaching is nice, trying to get guys to buy into a system is also nice. If you're center is smoking a pack a day and your #1 Dman has a Munchie Meal in his stomach you're better off embracing what rec league hockey is=organized chaos.
Agreed, but playing with the same group of people over a long period of time can help add some organization to that chaos. I play on 4 teams at different levels, and the key to success as a forward seems to be to learn your teammates tendencies, strengths and weaknesses. For example, just knowing whether the LD I'm playing with will follow me into the zone (I'm a LW) so I can give him a drop pass makes a huge difference. Instinctively knowing whether my RW is a leftie or rightie also makes a huge difference, as it shaves milliseconds off of my decision-making process.

I haven't seen beer league teams have a lot of success running set plays, but I have seen them being successful by being able to predict what their teammates are doing and acting appropriately.

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11-10-2013, 01:54 AM
  #43
JaeTM
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I'm the same way as you are, and all my teams are as well. Your remark about age gets to me though. I can feel myself getting older just for saying that though

Anyway, I'm 31 and play in 3 open leagues with kids as young as 17 and some who play in Juniors in CAN/US and who have come from the NAHL. We even have some D1 players who come in from time to time in summer leagues. Some of the best players around are over 30, and they play in both the 30+ and open leagues. I don't play in the 30+ leagues because 99% of my teammates are far too young and I'd rather stay with them, but judging by the older folks who dominate the open leagues it's safe to say the competition is high everywhere at this rink.

I am basically a ringer on 2 of my 3 current teams, because neither can compete w/o me or someone else to fill the same role. They're playing in open leagues w/young guys who should have endless energy and drive, and here's ol' me kicking their *****...
Nah, I'm not trying to say that all leagues 30+ are non-competitive, I just think it's safe to say that those leagues generally would be less competitive compared to 18 and over. At that age, you're still pretty young and you need some growing up to do to where you realize that it's not the end all be all, as opposed to the 30+ where you've done your growing up and realize that while competitive, it's more of just having a good time and enjoying the game.

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11-10-2013, 09:11 AM
  #44
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Got'cha.

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30+ where you've done your growing up
Ha - some more than others


Last edited by Ozz: 11-10-2013 at 10:31 PM.
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11-10-2013, 10:14 PM
  #45
The Tikkanen
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Devil Dancer View Post
Agreed, but playing with the same group of people over a long period of time can help add some organization to that chaos. I play on 4 teams at different levels, and the key to success as a forward seems to be to learn your teammates tendencies, strengths and weaknesses. For example, just knowing whether the LD I'm playing with will follow me into the zone (I'm a LW) so I can give him a drop pass makes a huge difference. Instinctively knowing whether my RW is a leftie or rightie also makes a huge difference, as it shaves milliseconds off of my decision-making process.

I haven't seen beer league teams have a lot of success running set plays, but I have seen them being successful by being able to predict what their teammates are doing and acting appropriately.
Agree 100%. I think "gelling" with your teammates is more likely than running set plays. Any outside effort is appreciated I think by most guys though, couldn't hurt to try new stuff out once in awhile and see what happens.

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11-10-2013, 11:07 PM
  #46
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Got'cha.



Ha - some more than others
Haha, yes, of course.

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Old
11-11-2013, 12:26 AM
  #47
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How about the set play where I hang out at the red line waiting for my dman to get the puck and pass through 3 opposing players to spring me for the breakaway?

Seriously though, after playing as a plug on the wing on a top div team for the last few years, this season I'm playing as a dman on a beginners team. I've always known how you're supposed to line up off the faceoff, but if I'm on the goal line position and the faceoff is won back to me I suddenly realize that I really don't know what to do with the puck here. I'm at a disadvantage to firing it up the boards, my forwards likely aren't open, and I have 1-2 seconds before I have a forechecker on me. Recently I've decided to just take a second and if I don't see an immediate pass just flip it high up the middle past the blueline... though now that I think about it I could just slap it down the boards the other direction to get an icing and let my partner have to worry about it

And as for conditioning for hockey? I hate jogging so instead I've taking up playing soccer once a week, it's really helped improve my hockey conditioning!

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11-11-2013, 02:25 AM
  #48
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Seriously though, after playing as a plug on the wing on a top div team for the last few years, this season I'm playing as a dman on a beginners team. I've always known how you're supposed to line up off the faceoff, but if I'm on the goal line position and the faceoff is won back to me I suddenly realize that I really don't know what to do with the puck here. I'm at a disadvantage to firing it up the boards, my forwards likely aren't open, and I have 1-2 seconds before I have a forechecker on me. Recently I've decided to just take a second and if I don't see an immediate pass just flip it high up the middle past the blueline... though now that I think about it I could just slap it down the boards the other direction to get an icing and let my partner have to worry about it
Instead of ringing it around with the intention if icing, here's where you could do somewhat of a 'set play', and just let your wingers know that if you get the puck off the draw and they're on the far side to go to the boards, so you can wing it to them.

As long as they know how to take it off the skate or are on the right stick side, they can easily collect it and be on their way. If they can get there quick enough and you can fire it quick enough, it usually starts a breakout!

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11-11-2013, 08:35 AM
  #49
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Faceoff in your own zone (Winning the FO & puck going to a dman): Wingers move to (near) the half boards on inside of the opposing defensemen & other dman moves away towards the other corner, centerman usually is the one to read the play & decide whether to move to a defensive position or offensive.

It's not a 'set play', but basic positioning & providing 'puck support'. The dman with the puck can run it around the boards either way & hit a winger, move it to the other dman or pass to the centerman if he's open.

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11-11-2013, 10:30 AM
  #50
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Set plays can be fun. But its extremely hard especially in hockey to run such plays... especially in BEER league. Or any adult league or any team where you guys are not playing with each other every day or practicing regularly.

Just play smart hockey. Make sure your players know where to be in the most common of situations.

I mean that is how we play at least. The only set play we really have is I tell my line if I am going to hold up the other center. I let them know by a hand movement on the draw. Then I hold him up while trying to keep the puck where it lands so my winger can swoop in and do what he has to do. It works a lot, that is when I am playing a center who I see I can do that too.

I am a big guy with strong balance so that is one of my strengths

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