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SKATES - Buying Guide and Advice II

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02-06-2012, 03:10 PM
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AIREAYE
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SKATES - Buying Guide and Advice II

Jarick asked me to write a Skate buying guide for addition to the database above and I gladly obliged. For more specific questions or suggestions, feel free to PM me

Skate Buying Guide


FIT IS THE MOST IMPORTANT
THIS IS NOT A FITTING GUIDE, BUT A PRIMER

Introduction:

It is important to understand that no skate will make you a better skater, just like any other gear, but on the flip side, having an improper skate for your foot/playing level could definitely hamper your ability. Next to helmets, skates are probably your most important piece of gear and thus, it is imperative to take the time and the budget to outfit yourself properly and if you’re fortunate to have a competent shop nearby, by all means go and seek their advice and support them with a purchase.

I also must stress that this guide is NOT INTENDED TO FIT THE READER, but intended to provide a good starting point for anyone looking to undertake a skate search, by no means is it a definitive rulebook. I write this guide to cater to anyone from the absolute beginner to the advanced level player and from toddlers to adults. Enjoy!

Sizing:

Technically a part of fit, finding the right numerical size is not an exact science, even though there are devices to measure it. Go to any skate/shoe shop looking for size and you’ll likely be sized with a Brannock device, with notches every half size along. Skate brannocks are different than shoe ones obviously and should always be used. A SENIOR size would be size 6 and above, a JUNIOR would be size 1 – 5.5 and a YOUTH would be 13.5 and below.

A very common belief regarding the relationship between shoe and skate size is that skate size is 'x' sizes down from shoe. There is no hard and fast rule about this. There is no concrete relation because of things like the fact that many people wear shoes either smaller or larger than what they should be in, or the fact that there are sizing inconsistencies from even within both shoe and skate manufacturers. The most accurate way to find your size is to determine the Brannock size and go from there. Some fitters prefer to figure out the smallest possible size that one would fit into and go around that mark, but the results should be the same. For those with differently sized feet, it is advisable to size yourself to the smaller foot, as the shop can stretch/adjust for the longer foot if they have the hardware.

For adults whose feet have stopped growing, the perfect fit is when, standing up, your longest toe skims or barely grazes the front of the toecap. One has to keep in mind that when in a skating motion and post-break-in, your foot slides back slightly, giving you a little room between toe and toecap and that your toes are not always perfectly flat when skating.

The dangers of getting a skate too big would be the risk of blisters due to a sliding foot or even bone spurs and other discomforts. Energy transfer in every stride is lost due to a sliding foot and heel lock is also compromised. For more insight into fitting children for skates, message me or post a comment in this thread.


Fit:

Now that you have found a size, it’s time to consider what type of boot from a manufacturer will fit your foot. The only way to achieve this is to understand where to start looking and trying on as many pairs in that ‘fit range’ as you can. It's important to understand that the terms I use to describe fit are not exact measurements, but are more by feel. This means that if you believe that you have a wider foot, you may still yet fit into something a little narrower. Hence, it's important to try on different fits.

Each manufacturer offers a different type of fit within each of their lines. It’s also important to know that some manufacturers have changed the type of fit/style of boot over the years so that ‘x’ brand skate from 5 years ago might not fit the same as today. For this section, I’ve decided to list out each manufacturer’s lines from recent/current times and explain some characteristics. Again, this is a rough starting point and my descriptions are (if you really want to get technical) arbitrary, but based on extensive experience.

Bauer
Features a 3 fit family with different characteristics and skates for all levels, for Bauer's descriptions, click here: http://www.bauer.com/gear/player/skates

Vapor :

• Tapered fit, narrow fit
• Narrow V-shaped heel that gradually widens out to a boxy toebox
• Slightly forward leaning stance due to aggressive angle of boot, tendon guard/back spine and lacing pattern
• Shallow boot (shallow instep)
• New for 2013 onwards (APX2 - X60) : Lightspeed Edge holder with quick replaceable runner system, +3mm taller holder compared to previous holders

Supreme :

• Wider forefoot/midfoot and heel compared to Vapor (Supreme C ~ Vapor D, Supreme D ~ E etc.)
• Rounder heel pocket, prominent ankle padding, more anatomically shaped than Vapor, overall a focus on an anatomical fit
• Deeper boot
• Boxy toecap
• NEW for 2014 onwards (MX3 - 160): Lightspeed Edge holder with quick replaceable runner system, +3mm taller holder compared to previous holders

Nexus :

• Wider and deeper than Supreme; widest and deepest Bauer fit
• Round, traditionally shaped deep heel pocket
• Boxy toecap, wider than Supreme
• Traditionally-built line with newer materials/technology = more forgiving/flexible than current models
• NEW for 2014 onwards (8000 - 5000): Lightspeed Edge holder with quick replaceable runner system, +3mm taller holder compared to previous holders

CCM/Reebok
Like Bauer, CCM/Reebok features a 3 fit family with different characteristics and skates for all levels.

REEBOK
http://reebokhockey.com/en/gear/player/skates

• Narrower fit (narrower than previous Reeboks, narrowest of CCM/Reebok's 3 families)
• Thicker ankle padding (air bladder in there)
• Pump feature beefs up ankle area for better heel-lock
• Shallower boot than CCM and Bauer Supreme/Nexus
• Round, tapered toe cap
• NEW for 2014 onwards (Ribcor - 24K): Speedblade 4.0 holder is 4mm taller than previous holders

REEBOK : 2009-2013 models (11K line, 20K line)

• Wider fit in general
• Thicker ankle padding (air bladder in there)
• Pump feature beefs up ankle area for better heel-lock
• Shallower boot than CCM and Bauer Supreme/Nexus
• Round, tapered toe cap
• From 11K line to 20K line : narrower heel, Pump works better on back ankle to lock in heel

CCM Tacks
http://ccmhockey.com/en/gear/player/skates

• Wider fit in general, all aspects of fit are wider than Reebok, and narrower than RBZ (heel, width, toebox width & depth, instep depth)
• Speedblade 4.0 holders (+ 4mm taller than previous holders) featured on all Tacks skates
• Extremely heat mouldable on higher end models and a very versatile fit

CCM RBZ
http://ccmhockey.com/en/gear/player/skates

• Widest fit of the 3 families (widest heel, width, toecap etc.)
• Round, deep anatomical heel pocket
***Unique sizing scheme throughout the line, refer to sizing guide in 1st post : http://hfboards.hockeysfuture.com/sh....php?t=1464383
• Tremendous level of heat mouldability on higher end models
• Speedblade 4.0 holders (+ 4mm taller than previous holders) featured from RBZ - RBZ 70

CCM RBZ (top end) review thread : http://hfboards.hockeysfuture.com/sh....php?t=1464383

Easton

Mako & Mako 2 :
http://www.modsquadhockey.com/forums...n-mako-skates/

Graf - This is one series of skate I have little knowledge on, for more info, visit their website (http://www.grafcanada.com/hockey_skates/) and consult a fitter carrying Graf skates.


Last edited by AIREAYE: 11-05-2014 at 01:29 PM.
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02-06-2012, 03:14 PM
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Widths :

A quick note regarding widths; you’ll likely see letters denoting width such as ‘D’, ‘E’, ‘EE’, ‘R’, ‘W’ or ‘C’ as the most common examples. I just want to clarify that a ‘D’ or ‘standard’ width is not consistent across skate lines and same with every other letter. For example, a Supreme ‘D’ width is actually a true ‘E’ width (due to the wider last) whereas a Vapor ‘D’ could be considered the true ‘standard’. Similarly we could also say that a CCM ‘D’ is not exactly equal to either a Reebok ‘D’ or Supreme ‘D’ either. They may be similar and some of you may find little difference, but it essentially depends on your own foot shape.

As a rule of thumb, the width denominations within each skate line simply denotes whether a particular skate is wider or of regular width within its own line. It’s hard to give examples in this context since everyone’s foot is different. However, it’s safe to say that if you’re not 100% confident on a width, you shouldn’t be set on a purchase without trying either narrower or wider. Ultimately though, one must remember that a skate should wrap snugly around the forefoot without feeling pressure or pain along the sides.

Price-Points :

Provided that you have narrowed down your right fit to a line or two, it’s time to consider how much you want to spend and the relation to your skating/playing level. Fortunately, since this is up to the buyer, this section should be pretty straightforward.

Top-End Skates : ex. Bauer Supreme TotalOne MX3/190, Bauer Nexus 8000/7000, Bauer Vapor APX2/X100/X90, CCM RBZ, CCM Tacks, Reebok Ribcor, Easton Mako II

This range geared towards the pro/high/competitive level skater playing very frequently over the course of the season. Built with the highest quality materials, you can expect this range to have the greatest level of support and performance for those powerful strides and movements needing maximum energy transfer; this is the biggest selling point for this level. The amount of support in both the boot and tongue is top-notch, heat mouldability should be at its best while the quality of the holder and steel should be at its highest as well (more on these below). Weight should also be at its lowest.

High End Skates : ex. Bauer Supreme 180, Bauer Vapor X80, Bauer Nexus 6000, CCM RBZ 100/ RBZ 90, CCM Tacks 6052, Reebok 30K, Easton Mako M8

This range is geared to those playing at a high or intermediate level desiring top end performance without the top end price. In my opinion, this price range has the greatest value as you get most of the high end features at a lower price. Also, skates in this range are often (so, not always) an older top end skate (ex. Vapor X90 ≈ X7.0, Supreme 190 ≈ One.9) with a few differences. Materials and every other aspect should take a very slight downgrade (not always the case).

Mid-End Skates : ex. Bauer Supreme 170, Bauer Vapor X70, CCM RBZ 80/ RBZ 70, CCM Tacks 5052, Reebok 28K/26K

This range caters to the average or intermediate level skater needing a skate that will perform for them without the unnecessary stiffness and price. Specs-wise it’s simply a continuously proportional level of downgrade (obviously, right?). In my opinion, this is a great range for your average beer-leaguer or house-league/lower competitive level youth player.

Lower-Middle End Skates : ex. Bauer Vapor X60, Bauer Supreme 160, Bauer Nexus 5000, CCM RBZ 60, CCM Tacks 4052, Reebok 24K

This range caters to your beginner beer leaguer, house league/select player and the frequent rec skater desiring a good level of durability and performance. Great pricepoint to be at for that level of play.

Entry Level : ex. Vapor X30 - X50, Supreme 140-150, Nexus 4000, CCM RBZ 40/50, CCM Tacks 2052/3052, Reebok 22K

This range caters to your beginner skater and casual rec-skater. In my opinion, one should opt for the level of skate one (or 2) above the very bottom in this range since I find that the level of performance/durability seems to be better disproportionally, though ultimately it’s up to you on how much $$ you want to spend. At this level, the level of heat mouldability is non-existent, so you’ll have to break them in the old-fashioned way.

As the years go by and technology improves, the level of skate has progressed with it. Today’s mid/low-mid level skates are almost always at or above the level of support and weight of traditional leather-made skates. For those old-timers moving from older skates such as original Tacks generations or the original Supremes, this isn’t always a positive. That’s why again, I stress the importance of trying skates on in person.

For children fitting into youth sizes, the type of fit should carry over and the ‘finger-in-the-back’ aid would still help. However, most manufacturers offer youth skates only in either 2 or 3 price-points and the same principal of better materials/stiffness still applies, though the youth skates almost never use the same materials as the Junior or Senior models and likely won't fit the same way either. Again, see which fits your child the best and is most comfortable.

Holder/Runner :

The skate holder (plastic chassis) also varies amongst manufacturers and among price-points. It’s important to note that when considering a holder replacement, sometimes the location of the rivet holes might not always match with the boot if you want to use a brand ‘x’ holder on a brand ‘y’ skate. A competent pro shop technician should be able to tell you whether or not it would be safe for them to re-drill holes.

The skate runner (steel), like the level of skate itself, varies according to brand and price-point. At the very low-end, there are runners featuring low-quality carbon-steel which will rust more easily, is heavier and won’t hold an edge as well and for as long. The stainless steel is the most common steel and as you move up, there will be lighter steel and so forth. It is important to note that low-end skates (ex. Vapor X50) will not allow you to remove the runner for replacement (it’s integrated into the holder). It is also important to note that you cannot always use brand ‘x’ runner on brand ‘y’ holder due to different configurations. Consult your pro shop technician for suggestions or alternatives or post a question here.

There are also aftermarket steel options (like Step Steel) that offer a higher quality product. I won't get into it here because it's a more advanced option, but feel free to ask about them!

Heat Molding/Baking :

As a rule of thumb, one should almost always opt to have new skates baked so that the break-in is shortened. All current skates save for the lowest-end models have internal foams that are heat sensitive enough to be able to form better around your foot. It is important to understand that baking WILL NOT make a poorly fitting skate fit any better. It simply increases comfort and minimizes the break-in period. After each subsequent bake however, it is also important to understand that the breakdown of the foams/liners is slightly accelerated. One shouldn’t have to bake skates more than 2-3 times.

Baking should be included as part of the cost of the skate as well. DO NOT bake skates yourself at home, as a proper skate oven at the proper temperature (a small compact convection oven) is always required. Baking at home has a very high risk of damaging the skate and voiding any warranties. If there is no other option, there are videos online telling you how, but do so at your own risk.

Note : Reebok skates with Pump are able to be baked provided that the air bladder is deflated before putting them in the skate oven and remain so on the foot.

Radius of Hollow, Sharpening Tips:

Now that your skates have been properly fitted (hopefully) and baked to your foot, the next step to every new skate purchase would be to sharpen them, which, like baking, should be included as part of the cost. This is necessary since skates come out of the factory unsharpened and you simply cannot skate on them.

Radius of Hollow (ROH, also referred to as ‘cut’) is simply how deep or shallow you would like your sharpening to be. ROH measures the depth of the groove between your 2 edges and comes in denominations from 1” (shallowest) to 3/8” (deepest) and can be asked for in increments of 1/16” (ex. 9/16”). The deeper the cut, the more bite or grip into the ice you will receive, at the expense of glide and vice-versa. For the most part, the ‘standard’ cut is 1/2” and if you’ve simply been dropping off skates to your local sharpener, that is your likely hollow. Most people stay in the range of 5/8” to 3/8” (think bell curve) and I wouldn’t suggest you stray away from that unless you know for sure what you’ll be getting and what you need. The cut, thus, is personal preference. I do, however, recommend that heavier-set players try a shallower cut as they can dig into the ice with the same force while lighter-set players could try the deeper cuts. There are also other types of cuts such as Flat Bottom V (FBV), Z-Channel etc. so consult your local shop or post a question here about those.

A good sharpening would result in both edges being even. A good way to check this is to bring a quarter with you and after a sharpening, lay it flat against the edges (you should do this in the front, middle and back end of the steel to be sure) and see if it’s level. If not, then politely request the sharpener to redo them while showing him/her the uneven edge. One should get skates sharpened after every 4-5 sessions or so. Again, this is up to personal preference and level of play. One should also note that outdoor ice is tougher on your edges as well. Also, make sure to never walk on areas other than the rubber layered floor as any other surface can ruin your edges; thus it’s a good idea to also invest in some skate guards. Take care of your skates as well. Make sure to wipe down the steel and holder after every session as the water can seep in and cause rusting and damage the steel.

Accessories :

Socks :

Personal preference, but generally it is advisable to go with thinner socks for better comfort and feel of the ice in my opinion. Avoid ankle socks obviously. For those not looking to buy a pair of hockey-specific socks, there’s always the option of dress socks.

Laces :

Again, personal preference, but it is generally advisable to replace stock laces with another hockey-specific brand one (ex. Elite Hockey, Sidelines Sports etc.). Bauer stock laces are notoriously horrible while one could conceivably get away with sticking to CCM/Reebok or Easton ones. Wax laces simply offer more grip so that the boot doesn’t loosen as much over the course of the game.

Footbeds :

The necessity of after market footbeds (ex. ShockDoctor, Superfeet etc.) is of some debate and there is no set guideline for requiring them. Some people require orthotics, there are footbeds for heel support and there are arch support products. For more details, post in this thread!

Miscellaneous :

Buying Used - not ideal, though again, fit is the most important, so if you can find a good fitting boot, then it becomes a possibility. Depending on its condition, the possible necessity to replace steel should be considered as well. Generally not advisable to re-bake used skates depending on condition as it further accelerates its breakdown.

Pro Stock - Most pro stock skates are so heavily customized (see below) that they fit that particular player’s foot the best and not necessarily yours. The skate itself might not even resemble it’s retail counterpart anymore! Only consider if you’ve tried them on/know exactly what you’re looking for in a skate.

Custom - An option for the high end player or the player willing to drop the cash (typically an upcharge above the retail price, up to dealer, and only on certain models of top end skates). There are also some skaters with ‘abnormally’ sized feet (ie. Very very wide or narrow, differently sized feet) requiring this route as well. For custom skates, contact your local shop and they will guide you through the process.

Conclusion :

I must stress that this guide is no replacement for a competent fitter. Nor should it be your only reference if you must resort to online shopping. The privilege of having the help of a good fitter and the availability of actually trying on skates yourself cannot be surpassed. This guide is simply meant to be an introductory read into skate shopping.

Speaking of a competent fitter, for those you in reasonable proximity of a shop, head there now. If you want to see whether or not you should trust the person assisting you, simply ask them what the ‘best’ skate for you would be. If their response centres around ‘best skate = best fit’ and they have a good attitude/seem to know what they’re doing, then by all means give them your support. If not, then go elsewhere or seek out a more knowledgeable associate. Also, remember not to judge a book by its cover

Happy shopping!


Last edited by AIREAYE: 07-06-2014 at 06:50 PM.
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12-02-2013, 11:12 PM
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SKATES - Buying Guide and Advice II

Link to previous here:

http://hfboards.hockeysfuture.com/sh....php?t=1099867

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12-03-2013, 12:07 AM
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CarpeNoctem asked me in the last thread if the RBZ 90 was stiff enough for me. I wish it was a little bit stiffer, but it wasn't something that I noticed tremendously tonight. I feel that unless you're making some stupid Datsyuk like movements, you should be fine in them.

I do wish they didnt give as long of laces though. Had to switch them out with my Graf laces.

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12-03-2013, 02:53 PM
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Any suggestions on a replacement for my CCM Vector 6.0's. My toe is wide compared to my very, very narrow heel. Any suggestions on a skate with similar fit, that might be more durable?

Details:

My last two skates have been CCM vector 6.0s, with my current pair being 3 or 4 years old.
They fit me perfectly, but, they have broken down extremely quickly, with signficant work being required to keep them going after only about a year. Specifically on both of them the foot base has cracked into many pieces .

I'm just an overweight middle aged guy, but I play 4 times a week, year around, with another 3-4 hours of coaching ice time a week, so the skates see a fair amount of use.

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12-03-2013, 03:11 PM
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Hey Calvin, CCM skates were sub-par ever since the Tacks generations until recently with the RBZ line. I suggest you try there. Also give Bauer skates a try.

Even though you say your toes are wide, they may be wider in certain parts compared to a skate than others. You need to try on different skates and widths to see which fits you the best.

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12-03-2013, 06:06 PM
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I currently use Bauer XIII's size 10.5 EE.

I busted the blade on my right skate. The blade is a Tuuk Custom+ 296. I cant find these blades anywhere.... and if I do, its at a ridiculous price. I got these skates for $100 and they are 3 years old so I'm not looking to spend $60 on blades.

What would be a comparable feeling skate to these? And whats the best store to get a deal these days in the Greater Toronto Area?

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12-03-2013, 07:58 PM
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CarpeNoctem
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shaun Bisson View Post
CarpeNoctem asked me in the last thread if the RBZ 90 was stiff enough for me. I wish it was a little bit stiffer, but it wasn't something that I noticed tremendously tonight. I feel that unless you're making some stupid Datsyuk like movements, you should be fine in them.

I do wish they didnt give as long of laces though. Had to switch them out with my Graf laces.
Thanks for your thoughts on that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Calvin123 View Post
Any suggestions on a replacement for my CCM Vector 6.0's. My toe is wide compared to my very, very narrow heel. Any suggestions on a skate with similar fit, that might be more durable?

Details:

My last two skates have been CCM vector 6.0s, with my current pair being 3 or 4 years old.
They fit me perfectly, but, they have broken down extremely quickly, with signficant work being required to keep them going after only about a year. Specifically on both of them the foot base has cracked into many pieces .

I'm just an overweight middle aged guy, but I play 4 times a week, year around, with another 3-4 hours of coaching ice time a week, so the skates see a fair amount of use.
Wide toebox with narrow heels might make the Supreme line a good fit for you, as was said above. Also, if you're skating that much, a higher end model, not necessarily top of the line, might be a good fit.

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12-04-2013, 08:56 PM
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anyone got a tuuk custom 296mm skate blade they want to donate to me? lol

They want $60 for a pair in stores and I got my skates on sale for $100. Cant justify paying that.

If nobody does, looks like ill be getting new skates!

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12-04-2013, 09:12 PM
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CarpeNoctem
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Leaf_Crazy View Post
anyone got a tuuk custom 296mm skate blade they want to donate to me? lol

They want $60 for a pair in stores and I got my skates on sale for $100. Cant justify paying that.

If nobody does, looks like ill be getting new skates!
Check out ebay, man. I'll bet they have them on there!

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12-04-2013, 09:14 PM
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I found one on Ebay, 35 for a single.....and that means I wont be able to play hockey till the end of next week. =(

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12-04-2013, 11:46 PM
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Looking for a bit of advice on fit.

I am buying new skates because I am realizing that my current 2 yr old Easton Synergy (size 7D) are certainly to long and not wide enough. I play D-League Hockey 1-2 times per week.

I tried several skates at a local store and shortlisted the following skates.

-Bauer Supreme One.6 Size 6.5 EE
-CCM RBZ 70 Size 6 D

Both of these skates are comfortable. But my problem is that they are not, in fact, perfect. They are simply the best that I could try.

- The One.6 was a very good fit in width, but my toes don't brush up against the tip at all. They are better than my current Eastons, but I feel would ideally need a 6. They don't have the One.6 in 6EE, so I tried the One.9 in 6EE and felt a bit "squeezed". But it seemed to be a volume thing, not a foot size thing?

-Something similar happened with the RBZ 70, but worse. I feel like the 6D is a decent fit, but I get slight pressure points in the front/toebox area AND my toes don't brush up against the front. The 6EE seemed a bit too wide. The store suggested that I may be a 5.5EE in RBZ, but they didn't have this for me to try. The 5.5D didn't even come close to fitting.

So now for the questions:

1) I feel like I should get the One.6 in size 6.5EE (that feels the most comfortable). Is it a big deal that it is probably a bit too long? I don't think my foot would slide very much and the heel lock looks decent. This seems better to me than going down a size and not having enough volume or feeling tight in other places? Or does the heat moulding take care of this and the lenght is more important?

2) Could I really be a 5.5 in RBZ? Is it worth for me to hunt around town looking for a 5.5EE even if I don't come close to fitting a 5.5 D? This would mean the difference in volume in RBZ between D and EE is substantial (more so than other makes?)

At this point, it is a good thing I found this thread as I have tried so many different skates that I am getting complete decision paralysis.

Thanks

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12-05-2013, 02:48 PM
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Quick bump:

I don't want to be a nag, but I am really hoping to pick up the 6.5 EE ASAP or special order a pair from the very helpful LHS. But the store doesn't want to special order multiple pairs they don't keep, so which ones? Am I good to go with the comfy One.6s that I don't touch the end?

Anyone? All options welcome

<confused and anxious to get new skates>

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12-05-2013, 02:55 PM
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AIREAYE
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Read over my guidelines on a perfect fit for an adult. When you skate (knees bent, leaning forward) your heel always pulls back. When you bake and break in the skate, you gain a little more room as well. Based solely on what you're saying, it sounds like 6EE might be a bit better.

You could very well also be in 5.5EE RBZ, but you need to try it to be sure.

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12-05-2013, 04:46 PM
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Thanks for the reply. It sounds like I probably need the 6.0s and my volume concerns will be answered by the baking/breakin.

Can you confirm that it makes sense for the RBZs to be 5.5EEs and if it is normal for the volume between a 6 and 5.5 to be so drastically different? I guess I am concerned that moving down a size will make me fail the "pencil test" for boot depth? (in either skate). It is currently perfect on the Supreme and a bit on the close side for the RBZs.

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12-05-2013, 07:36 PM
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CarpeNoctem
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This isn't a reply to anyone here specifically but if you are a beginner player, do not buy top end skates. The stiffness is going to impair your agility significantly. The stiffer the boot, the more you'll have to bend your knees and aggressively hit your edges. It drives me crazy when I see novices doing this and it makes their outside edge control go from bad to non-existent.

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12-05-2013, 10:39 PM
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AIREAYE
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caz5512 View Post
Thanks for the reply. It sounds like I probably need the 6.0s and my volume concerns will be answered by the baking/breakin.

Can you confirm that it makes sense for the RBZs to be 5.5EEs and if it is normal for the volume between a 6 and 5.5 to be so drastically different? I guess I am concerned that moving down a size will make me fail the "pencil test" for boot depth? (in either skate). It is currently perfect on the Supreme and a bit on the close side for the RBZs.
Regarding the CCM sizing, again, check out what I wrote in the first post of the Guide. I have found that the overall volume tradeoff between the 5.5 and 6 to be larger, consistent with most jumps from junior to senior sizes. however you still should give it a try.

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12-05-2013, 11:20 PM
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Originally Posted by Leaf_Crazy View Post
I found one on Ebay, 35 for a single.....and that means I wont be able to play hockey till the end of next week. =(
I won't be back in the shop I work at until Monday but I will check for that steel if you'd like. That way you have extras and we're trying to clear out the old stuff. I'll let you know either way' PM me if you'd like so I remember lol.

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12-06-2013, 09:09 AM
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Just ordered a pair of these

http://www.hockeyoffice.com/reebok-s...iE4493373.html

Any other goalies have experience with them? Right now I use the old 5k pumps (They've lasted since 2008 and still going!) so I'm assuming these will be fairly similar

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12-09-2013, 09:31 PM
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Today I went in and got fitted into some new skates, and they had very few to try on that fit my foot. I have a wide foot with pretty high arches so volume is an issue. The skates that I ended up trying on were Vapor x70 size 7ee, which felt like I could do because the volume was there but maybe just a tad long/narrow. Then I tried on the nexus 6.5d and the width was there but the depth was horrible.

Would a 6.5 EE Nexus have a considerable more amount of volume that just the D width? Or would it be that bad to get a 7 EE to make sure I have that volume?

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12-09-2013, 09:42 PM
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AIREAYE
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Propane Nightmares View Post
Just ordered a pair of these

http://www.hockeyoffice.com/reebok-s...iE4493373.html

Any other goalies have experience with them? Right now I use the old 5k pumps (They've lasted since 2008 and still going!) so I'm assuming these will be fairly similar
We have a bunch of them and they're a go to mid-end skate. I'm not a goalie, but from what I can gauge, they seem solid.

Quote:
Originally Posted by manderson528 View Post
Today I went in and got fitted into some new skates, and they had very few to try on that fit my foot. I have a wide foot with pretty high arches so volume is an issue. The skates that I ended up trying on were Vapor x70 size 7ee, which felt like I could do because the volume was there but maybe just a tad long/narrow. Then I tried on the nexus 6.5d and the width was there but the depth was horrible.

Would a 6.5 EE Nexus have a considerable more amount of volume that just the D width? Or would it be that bad to get a 7 EE to make sure I have that volume?
Get the correct length first. If you go too long, you could run into other problems later on. Any chance of trying Vapor in 6.5EE? Any chance of trying other skates like Bauer Supreme? CCM? Reebok?

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12-09-2013, 10:02 PM
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manderson528
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Originally Posted by AIREAYE View Post
Get the correct length first. If you go too long, you could run into other problems later on. Any chance of trying Vapor in 6.5EE? Any chance of trying other skates like Bauer Supreme? CCM? Reebok?
Yeah I just went by what they had in the store. They didn't have hardly any EE widths for me to try on, I was honestly disappointed. The only EE width they had in my size was that size 7 x70. I just dont have the luxury of trying on the skates before either the LHS or I order them. Im wondering if theres considerably more volume to the 6.5 EE as apposed to the D Nexus?

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12-09-2013, 10:37 PM
  #23
AIREAYE
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No one can tell you for sure, but it might allow your foot to sit down a little further, with less 'lifting' due to the narrowness. I really do urge you to try on other skates though, maybe take a day trip during the holidays somewhere?

Doesn't Players Bench have a big box in CO?

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12-21-2013, 12:17 AM
  #24
Watch for the Yeti
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I have had around 8 practices with my RBZ 40s, and I am thinking I have to upgrade. I think they could be prohibiting my skating ability (could just be psycological). What do you guys suggest ? Hopefully I make alot of money during christmas, and will be able to purchase a new pair. My limit will probably be $200, I am going to use that $200 to buy the skates instead of a new stick, even though my stick isn't long enough for me and it's a little too whippy. What do you guys suggest for skates? I am looking for a skate that will mold to my feet very well after baking, and is stiff and has good support. I want a light skate, etc.

Hopefully this will help my skating ability, as I heard from numerous people that purcasing new skates can change your ability overnight. If you guys don't think it will make a big difference, please let me know as I can use the money somewhere else (like a stick).

I am not sure if I am considered a beginner, I played 7 years before a 5 year layoff. I am 16 now, so the last time I played before this year was 11. I saw someone post in the thread that beginners shouldn't buy top end skates, I don't know if I am considered a beginner or what is considered a top end skate.

I have found 5 skates that I am interested in.

Bauer Vapor X5.0
Bauer Vapor x60
CCM RBZ 70
Bauer Nexus 400
Bauer Nexus 600

What do you guys think are the best for me and do you have any other suggestions?


Last edited by Watch for the Yeti: 12-22-2013 at 01:09 AM.
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12-22-2013, 11:02 PM
  #25
AIREAYE
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Like with all skate questions, you should pick the one that fits best. In terms of level of skate, I think any of those listed would do quite well. Once you hit those mid ranges, the skates could really start to mold better around your foot.

If you're on a budget, I would always suggest sourcing out clearance models, such as the X5.0, which are going to be the stiffest and most supportive skate of the bunch. Why not try some Supreme/Eastons/Reeboks? The Supreme and Nexus lines should soon/already be on sale as the new lines for them come out this spring.

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