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Hand Eye Coordination

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Old
12-04-2013, 04:15 PM
  #1
Malarowski
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Hand Eye Coordination

Hello folks,

I notice more and more that my coordination with the stick in the air is awful, so I am looking for advise and practice methods how to improve that.

Specifically I have huge trouble with bouncing and elevated pucks, and swatting anything down.

First thing that sprung to mind was bouncing a tennis ball around at home with my stick, does anybody else have good methods for that?

Best,
Mike

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12-04-2013, 04:23 PM
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Ozz
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That can't hurt. What about taking a puck and doing the ol' hackey sack style routine?



I caught myself doing this a few days ago in warmups. Someone went to flick a puck into the bench, missed, I picked it up off a bounce and started messing around for a bit before popping it over the bench. I don't do any particular exercises but...I can do this and I am pretty good catching pucks out of the air at full speed so there is probably a correlation.

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12-04-2013, 05:02 PM
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thevil
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Use this:

http://www.hockeymonkey.com/sklz-hoc...tion-ball.html

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12-04-2013, 07:45 PM
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Malarowski
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thevil View Post
I got one of those, what am I supposed to do? Bounce that against the wall?

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12-04-2013, 08:02 PM
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Ozz
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Yes, then try to hit it with your stick.

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12-04-2013, 08:11 PM
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CarpeNoctem
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Practice fast movements with the puck while skating. One very practical exercise is to work with a teammate and pass back/forth while skating up ice at medium speed. When you get good and can one-touch snap a pass back in stride, you'll know your hand eye has really improved.

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12-04-2013, 10:05 PM
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Stickchecked
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Golf balls in the basement are good for developing hand-eye coordination. Getting it to bounce off walls and the floor feels like the closest thing to handling a bouncing puck.

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12-04-2013, 11:54 PM
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Malarowski
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stickchecked View Post
Golf balls in the basement are good for developing hand-eye coordination. Getting it to bounce off walls and the floor feels like the closest thing to handling a bouncing puck.
I guess I'll also get to practice scraps when my wife finds out what that noise is, haha. I'll give it a try outside though, golf balls seem like a great challenge to also stop it with soft hands.

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12-05-2013, 12:08 AM
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vapor11
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I have been using my smarthockey ball last few months in the basement..have improved my ability to bounce the ball off my stick a ton..can get 10-20 bounces on the regular..dont have much tricks but I often make the ball come to a stop on the blade then continue bouncing

Something that scratches my mind is for years I see almost every NHL player flip the puck into the refs hands on the regular.. I like to think im a pretty skilled player myself but when I get on the ice my ability to flip the puck up high with pinpoint precision is not existant..I have been watching it for years and I cant believe the players dont mess up ever..I have no problem with flip passes

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12-05-2013, 07:52 AM
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Canadiens1958
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Hockey Basics

Before trying the various exercises review your hockey basics.

When going to the net keep the stick blade visible to the puck carrier/ shooter. This will allow you to react earlier to passes, deflection attempts, rebounds, re-directs, etc.

Also your body positioning should always be in line with the direction from which the puck is coming. Otherwise, turning or re-positioning will delay your reactions or make them awkward. You will also misread the speed, the arc and the movement of the puck.

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12-05-2013, 08:13 AM
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Coachtdoig
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Canadiens1958 View Post
Before trying the various exercises review your hockey basics.

When going to the net keep the stick blade visible to the puck carrier/ shooter. This will allow you to react earlier to passes, deflection attempts, rebounds, re-directs, etc.

Also your body positioning should always be in line with the direction from which the puck is coming. Otherwise, turning or re-positioning will delay your reactions or make them awkward. You will also misread the speed, the arc and the movement of the puck.
Great Stuff!

You don't necessarily have to bat anything up or down when tipping. Most times just letting the puck hit you blade or shaft in itself will change the direction of the puck and give the goalie trouble.

Agree that your body positioning and showing your stick and blade to the shooter (where you want the puck) will have you in that set and ready position before the puck is even shot.

Tennis ball/ Golf ball balancing on the blade will help, definitely won't hurt. Following the puck all the way to your stick is key, don't give up on it and "hope" it hits your stick as it gets close to you.

Hope this helps

Ciao,
TD

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12-05-2013, 08:23 AM
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Canadiens1958
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Nhl

^^^ Watching NHL games, you will notice how many scoring or defensive opportunities are wasted by poor to average basics.


Last edited by Canadiens1958: 12-06-2013 at 12:41 PM. Reason: caps
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12-05-2013, 08:42 AM
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sanityplease
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Malarowski View Post
I guess I'll also get to practice scraps when my wife finds out what that noise is, haha. I'll give it a try outside though, golf balls seem like a great challenge to also stop it with soft hands.
+1 to golf balls.

I keep a few around wrapped in a few strips hockey tape to take a bit of the bounce away (on concrete). Stickhandle, bounce it off of walls etc., works great. A lot of the blade angle & positioning will come naturally as you improve.

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12-05-2013, 08:53 AM
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jazzykat
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Here's a dumb question: do you watch the puck all the way to the blade of your stick when receiving a pass?

In soccer (I know it isn't hockey) I was good enough so I barely ever looked down and somehow the ball always ended up on my foot. Is this the same concept, or is it more like baseball where you "keep you eye on the ball"?

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12-05-2013, 08:56 AM
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Coachtdoig
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzykat View Post
Here's a dumb question: do you watch the puck all the way to the blade of your stick when receiving a pass?

In soccer (I know it isn't hockey) I was good enough so I barely ever looked down and somehow the ball always ended up on my foot. Is this the same concept, or is it more like baseball where you "keep you eye on the ball"?
Same concept, until you can stick handle and make plays without looking down at the puck you should follow the puck onto your blade. With repetition it will become natural not to look down when giving and receiving passes.

Ciao,
TD

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12-06-2013, 11:01 AM
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Coachtdoig
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Great tool to have at home if you have enough space for it. Will help to work on giving and receiving passes.

http://www.hockeyshot.com/HockeyShot...ng-aid-012.htm

Ciao,
TD

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Old
12-20-2013, 10:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coachtdoig View Post
Same concept, until you can stick handle and make plays without looking down at the puck you should follow the puck onto your blade. With repetition it will become natural not to look down when giving and receiving passes.

Ciao,
TD
I personally think it's terrible advice to keep your "eye" on the puck especially when stick handling. Keep your head up, if you miss the puck, then you miss it. Even NHL players miss passes (hence icing calls) and "deflections". When receiving passes, yes track the puck but don't stare at it once you receive it. Look up and check your surroundings. Unlike soccer, hockey is faster and there's more dangerous body contact

There's not too many goals that get a "perfect" deflection. They usually hit players/shin guards/legs before going in.

I agree with some people that you can practice your hand eye with those aids and playing around with those training balls.

I would say during the game, focus on positioning than deflecting pucks. Get in better position to receive that pass or in front of the net so you can take a rebound/screen the goal/deflect a puck.


Last edited by goonx: 12-20-2013 at 10:14 PM.
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12-21-2013, 12:41 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coachtdoig View Post
Great tool to have at home if you have enough space for it. Will help to work on giving and receiving passes.

http://www.hockeyshot.com/HockeyShot...ng-aid-012.htm
Just a heads up, if $65 is too expensive for anyone: some 2x4's, screws and a flat bungee cord can make up a much cheaper version of this.

Quick youtube search gives me this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OI0xrpWtTbI

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Old
12-21-2013, 08:45 AM
  #19
American in Paris
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At the end of practice, I like to put the pucks back in the bucket by flipping them up in the air then whacking them down into the bucket. This has really helped my ability to knock down aerial passes.

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Old
12-23-2013, 09:40 AM
  #20
Coachtdoig
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goonx View Post
I personally think it's terrible advice to keep your "eye" on the puck especially when stick handling. Keep your head up, if you miss the puck, then you miss it. Even NHL players miss passes (hence icing calls) and "deflections". When receiving passes, yes track the puck but don't stare at it once you receive it. Look up and check your surroundings. Unlike soccer, hockey is faster and there's more dangerous body contact

There's not too many goals that get a "perfect" deflection. They usually hit players/shin guards/legs before going in.

I agree with some people that you can practice your hand eye with those aids and playing around with those training balls.

I would say during the game, focus on positioning than deflecting pucks. Get in better position to receive that pass or in front of the net so you can take a rebound/screen the goal/deflect a puck.
I must have missed where I said "stare down at the puck when its on your stick" ? I said follow the puck as you receive a pass so that would be the exact same thing as tracking the puck. This forum is not for NHL players it is for average players trying to get better at the game.

So, therefore, it is okay to look down a little more when taking+receiving passes and stick handling. The more comfortable you get with those skills the less you will need to look down and can keep your head up. Taking the .5 seconds to look down to make sure you receive the pass or .5 seconds to look down to make sure the puck is on your blade before making a pass should be okay and you should still have time to see a player coming and brace yourself.

In saying that you don't have to have your head between your legs. Putting your head in a position where you can still see up ice while having your stick in your peripheral is a skill that will come a long as well. You will be able to track the puck while having a good sense of what is coming toward you and where an open team mate is.

That is just my opinion though, hope that helps.

Ciao,
TD

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Old
12-23-2013, 12:45 PM
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Thesensation19
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Besides what everyone else is saying, which is all true, do other sports.

Just in terms of coordination,

1) Baseball/Batting Cages/Catch - All good for hand eye coordination. Try to go to a batting cage a few times
2) Lacrosse - Grab a lax stick and a ball. Head with a friend or yourself and practice off a wall or playing catch w a friend. Great for hand eye
3) Soccer- Great for foot eye coordination and warm ups. Kick a ball with a friend, practice juggling by yourself. Soccer is a sport I feel every kid should play for years as development for other sports too.

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Old
12-25-2013, 02:05 AM
  #22
nullterm
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Just to add: Juggling

Find three balls or spend $5 on a set of juggling balls. Watch some howto videos and start practicing. Easy to keep in your bag to get hands warmed up pregame.

No better hand eye exercise. And fun at parties.

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