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One flaw in my skating- turning right..

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12-12-2013, 08:16 AM
  #1
ORLY
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One flaw in my skating- turning right..

My skating ability is great except for turning right...this one thing is preventing me from taking that next step to skating even better.

I do not feel confident in turning right quickly (example to turn around and back check) I usually always turn left because i can do it far greater than turning right. I can turn with great agility and quickness left..but turning right...I can't dig in as much it feels and I'm slower at it.

This is really annoying, is it a balance thing? Most people don't notice it because I'm usually one of the best skaters out there..but this part of my game needs to be improved.

I know I need to practice, but is this a balance problem? Not using my blades properly? I think it comes down to not leaning on the right foot (the inside foot) properly, but I do the exact same thing (or so I think) as the left..

This problem also affects my stopping while turning right..not that great also.

Long story short I'm not as agile turning right as I would like..any tips?

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12-12-2013, 08:27 AM
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CornKicker
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next time you turn left make note of your knee bend, if you are doing a tight turn properly your knee should almost be at a 90 degree angle, my guess witghout seeing you is you are not bending your right knee fully when turning right

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12-12-2013, 08:28 AM
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CornKicker
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one drill to help with the edge (your outside right edge) is to glide on your right foot and go inside to outside edge and back. do this all the way down the ice, you will find that your edge to edge is struggling which is probably due to knee bend

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12-12-2013, 08:32 AM
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ORLY
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Should be able to try that today, the fact that I usually neglect right turns unless necessary has probably set me back. Really going to practice that this year.

Thanks for the drill, I'm sure many others have this issue too.

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12-12-2013, 08:34 AM
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Canadiens1958
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Additional Info

Quote:
Originally Posted by ORLY View Post
My skating ability is great except for turning right...this one thing is preventing me from taking that next step to skating even better.

I do not feel confident in turning right quickly (example to turn around and back check) I usually always turn left because i can do it far greater than turning right. I can turn with great agility and quickness left..but turning right...I can't dig in as much it feels and I'm slower at it.

This is really annoying, is it a balance thing? Most people don't notice it because I'm usually one of the best skaters out there..but this part of my game needs to be improved.

I know I need to practice, but is this a balance problem? Not using my blades properly? I think it comes down to not leaning on the right foot (the inside foot) properly, but I do the exact same thing (or so I think) as the left..

This problem also affects my stopping while turning right..not that great also.

Long story short I'm not as agile turning right as I would like..any tips?
Additional info required.

Is the right or left side your power side?

Any injury(ies) to your right leg?

You shoot right or left?

Play LW, C or RW?

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12-12-2013, 08:45 AM
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ORLY
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Canadiens1958 View Post
Additional info required.

Is the right or left side your power side?

Any injury(ies) to your right leg?

You shoot right or left?

Play LW, C or RW?


Shoot left, mainly play C but also LW sometimes (which is sort of funny because of this issue if you think about it).

No injuries, and my right side is my power side I believe.

Edit: I also have pretty flat feet, would a support help with this?

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12-12-2013, 09:07 AM
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Chau Vo
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When you warm up skate clockwise instead of counterclockwise. It just takes practice to get comfortable with your weak edge.

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12-12-2013, 09:33 AM
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Canadiens1958
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Testing

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Originally Posted by ORLY View Post
Shoot left, mainly play C but also LW sometimes (which is sort of funny because of this issue if you think about it).

No injuries, and my right side is my power side I believe.

Edit: I also have pretty flat feet, would a support help with this?
The drills and advice offered so far will help but there are various tests that you should undergo to determine the extent of the difficulty.

Hockey testing. There are various skating cone tests that will define the extent of the difficulty you have. Clockwise and counterclockwise skating should be timed Under various conditions. This will give you a picture of the lag in your times and the progress your are making correcting the difficulty over time.

Also you should be tested for the strength of your right leg and left leg followed with appropriate off ice exercises to narrow the difference between the weaker and stronger leg.

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12-12-2013, 02:37 PM
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Joey Moss
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I have the exact same problem. My skating is fine outside of my right turn crossovers. I broke my right leg as a kid and I think that might have something to do with it because it kind of changed the way I walk now but it's unbelievably frustrating when skating. I don't know if it's the position my foot is in when stepping over but I almost have to do these mini, choppy crossovers on that side. My left side crossovers are much more fluid and powerful.

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12-12-2013, 03:36 PM
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Thesensation19
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Before I was 12 I could not stop on my left. Just couldnt.

Went to a West Point Summer Hockey camp where I played hockey twice a day, everyday for 6 days. drills and scrimmages. And a big game on the 7th day.

I recall that we did a lot of stop and go drills. The usual. But having done it everyday for a week, I remember coming back in august and going through drills with my team and I all of a sudden knew how to stop on my left.

If you want to get bettter at skating, you have to skate more.

Sure you can strengthen certain leg muscles and hip muscles and be more mobile or flexible but the skating best comes from actually skating

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12-12-2013, 04:08 PM
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sanityplease
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chau Vo View Post
It just takes practice to get comfortable with your weak edge.
This.

Do it cautiously @ first. Keep practicing until it's no longer a weakness. When you've mastered it, focus on another weakness.

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12-12-2013, 04:39 PM
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LarryO
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sanityplease View Post
This.

Do it cautiously @ first. Keep practicing until it's no longer a weakness. When you've mastered it, focus on another weakness.
+2.
Practise, practise, practise... and more practise. It's muscle memory. If you can do it well on one side, you have the potential of doing it as well on the other. Whether it's crossovers, braking, transitioning from forward to backward and vice/versa, always practise the weak side more than the strong side and one day you will become equally proficient on both sides. Once you're good at both sides, then practise both sides equally.

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12-16-2013, 09:20 AM
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Jmp123
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I would suggest getting Laura Stamm's book (http://www.amazon.com/Laura-Stamms-P...7207101&sr=1-1) Fairly cheap and can be a good reference for lots of different areas of skating and drills to do in public sessions.

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12-17-2013, 10:41 AM
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CornKicker
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joey Moss View Post
I have the exact same problem. My skating is fine outside of my right turn crossovers. I broke my right leg as a kid and I think that might have something to do with it because it kind of changed the way I walk now but it's unbelievably frustrating when skating. I don't know if it's the position my foot is in when stepping over but I almost have to do these mini, choppy crossovers on that side. My left side crossovers are much more fluid and powerful.
this may sound crazy but when you walk up stairs go with your right shoulder facing up the stairs and step over your right leg with your left then step behind your right leg with your left. do this every day on the stairs and i guarantee the next time you are on skates your crossover will feel a bit more natural. the older you are the longer it takes.

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12-17-2013, 02:46 PM
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SacredPetra
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CornKicker View Post
this may sound crazy but when you walk up stairs go with your right shoulder facing up the stairs and step over your right leg with your left then step behind your right leg with your left. do this every day on the stairs and i guarantee the next time you are on skates your crossover will feel a bit more natural. the older you are the longer it takes.
I do this up and down stairs too! It did seem to help.

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