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NSA Controversy Part II

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12-31-2013, 01:05 AM
  #101
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http://www.theverge.com/2013/12/27/5...ismissing-aclu



The ACLU is expected to appeal. I have a hard time seeing this end anywhere except SCOTUS.
The judge sounds like a complete nutcase

He apparently invoked 9/11 in the introduction of his op-ed... er I mean ruling

How in the WORLD do people like that become judges?!

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12-31-2013, 04:53 AM
  #102
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12-31-2013, 06:27 AM
  #103
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http://www.captainsjournal.com/2013/12/30/nsa-spying/

Security researchers have successfully broken one of the most secure encryption algorithms, 4096-bit RSA, by listening – yes, with a microphone — to a computer as it decrypts some encrypted data. The attack is fairly simple and can be carried out with rudimentary hardware. The repercussions for the average computer user are minimal, but if you’re a secret agent, power user, or some other kind of encryption-using miscreant, you may want to reach for the Rammstein when decrypting your data.

This acoustic cryptanalysis, carried out by Daniel Genkin, Adi Shamir (who co-invented RSA), and Eran Tromer, uses what’s known as a side channel attack. A side channel is an attack vector that is non-direct and unconventional, and thus hasn’t been properly secured. For example, your pass code prevents me from directly attacking your phone — but if I could work out your pass code by looking at the greasy smudges on your screen, that would be a side channel attack. In this case, the security researchers listen to the high-pitched (10 to 150 KHz) sounds produced by your computer as it decrypts data.

This might sound crazy, but with the right hardware it’s actually not that hard. For a start, if you know exactly what frequency to listen out for, you can use low- and high-pass filters to ensure that you only have the sounds that emanate from your PC while the CPU decrypts data. (In case you were wondering, the acoustic signal is actually generated by the CPU’s voltage regulator, as it tries to maintain a constant voltage during wildly varied and bursty loads). Then, once you have the signal, it’s time for the hard bit: Actually making sense of it.

Without going into too much detail, the researchers focused on a very specific encryption implementation: The GnuPG (an open/free version of PGP) 1.x implementation of the RSA cryptosystem. With some very clever cryptanalysis, the researchers were able to listen for telltale signs that the CPU was decrypting some data, and then listening to the following stream of sounds to divine the decryption key. The same attack would not work on different cryptosystems or different encryption software — they’d have to start back at the beginning and work out all of the tell-tale sounds from scratch.

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12-31-2013, 09:14 AM
  #104
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http://benswann.com/nsa-has-complete...t-you-knowing/

“The NSA’s ANT division develops implants for mobile phones and SIM cards. One of these is a spyware implant called “DROPOUTJEEP” — designed for the first generation of iPhones — which was still in development in 2008, shortly after the iPhone’s launch. This spyware was to make it possible to remotely download or upload files to a mobile phone. It would also, according to the catalog, allow the NSA to divert text messages, browse the user’s address book, intercept voicemails, activate the phone’s microphone and camera at will, determine the current cell site and the user’s current location, “etc.” ANT’s technicians also develop modified mobile phones, for use in special cases that look like normal, standard devices, but transmit various pieces of information to the NSA — that can be swapped undetected with a target’s own mobile phone or passed to informants and agents. In 2008, ANT had models from Eastcom and Samsung on offer, and it has likely developed additional models since.”

Read more: http://benswann.com/nsa-has-complete...#ixzz2p48vDbRd
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12-31-2013, 09:32 AM
  #105
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http://nypost.com/2013/12/30/state-d...acked-deleted/

WASHINGTON — The personal e-mail account of a State Department whis*tle**blower was hacked, and four years worth of messages — some detailing alleged wrongdoing at the agency — were deleted, The Post has learned.
The computer attack targeted the Gmail account of Diplomatic Security Service criminal investigator Richard Higbie, his lawyer, Cary Schulman, confirmed.
“They took all of his e-mails and then they deleted them all,” said Schulman. He said that he could not prove who was responsible for the hack job, but said the attack was “sophisticated” and called the targeting of Higbie “alarming.”
“Obviously, somebody is not happy with something he’s doing and wanted to get that information and also cause him an inability in the future to have ready access to that,” Schulman said.

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01-17-2014, 11:23 AM
  #106
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So Obama just finished making a speech about NSA reforms, which went about how you'd expect something with this much Beltway support to go. Lots of lip service and passing the buck.

http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/...A0G0JI20140117

No more spying on closely allied leaders, so if your name is Angela Merkel or David Cameron, you can rest easy. If not, tough luck.

He called on Congress to establish an outside panel of lawyers that the still-secret FISA courts can call in on large matters, whenever the courts decide that would be necessary. Because if we didn't trust those courts before, now we can totally trust them because they can maybe call in some experts whenever they deem it appropriate. Just like how we trust businesses to call in regulators on their own.

He supposedly tried to get the NSA to stop storing the data itself, instead leaving that data with ISPs and phone companies, but none of them wanted to take on the responsibility of storing all that extra data so that's still a work in progress. This sounds oddly familiar, like that time Obama tried to get Gitmo prisoners onto actual American land, but none of the states wanted to take them. How did that work out again?

The biggest thing he announced was that now the NSA needs judicial clearance to query the database. In the best case, that's not terribly different from requiring a warrant. In the worst case, it's just a token process.

EDIT: The NYT actually has a nice comparison of actions suggested by the reform panel vs. things Obama actually said in his speech today.

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2...raphic.html?hp


Last edited by Sevanston: 01-17-2014 at 03:50 PM.
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01-18-2014, 01:04 PM
  #107
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Because if we didn't trust those courts before, now we can totally trust them because they can maybe call in some experts whenever they deem it appropriate. Just like how we trust businesses to call in regulators on their own.
Good line, made me laugh.

Obama is doing diddly-squat about the Bush Administration excesses unless pressured, so when both parties do it you have to assume they consider the surveillance state to be part of the national interest, they know voters (who aren't experts) will let them do it (they have so far out of fear of terror). It is bs that we know all governments spy and we knew this was going on. We didn't know the extent of the program and the Snowden leaks are why we are having this conversation now. It isn't just a US problem, if some countries don't have US capabilities now, they soon will have. Nothing we can do about the dictatorships, but in our democracies, we should care and do something about building surveillance states. Canadians shouldn't be smug, our own govt was following the same practices and we've learned our own spy agencies were willing to be the NSA's *****es on a number of programs; we also have terrible watchdog practices over the our security agencies.

Most of the pressure to rein in the NSA will come from foreign governments (not US voters) and some powerful tech companies that stand to lose billions in foreign sales from clients who won't trust US tech if some regulations aren't put in and current practices don't change. It's mostly Germany in Europe that will wind up forcing Washington's hand on civil liberties (the UK it seems was onboard). Canada, the UK and the US should be ashamed of themselves for lagging on this issue (they are actually and unfortunately at the negative forefront).

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01-18-2014, 01:56 PM
  #108
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what it boils down to is politicians like Obama say things like they do when they are running for president. Then they become president and find out what a scary world it really is, and inevitably they make the decision that they would rather be known as being unable to eliminate things like the NSA program than going down in history as the president who allowed New York City to nuked

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01-18-2014, 01:59 PM
  #109
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Good line, made me laugh.

Obama is doing diddly-squat about the Bush Administration excesses unless pressured,
That's an understatement if I ever heard one. He's been ramping it up since day one. If not for the Snowden leaks he wouldn't have had to pretend like he cares, either.

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01-18-2014, 10:16 PM
  #110
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Originally Posted by PredsV82 View Post
what it boils down to is politicians like Obama say things like they do when they are running for president. Then they become president and find out what a scary world it really is, and inevitably they make the decision that they would rather be known as being unable to eliminate things like the NSA program than going down in history as the president who allowed New York City to nuked
I don't think it has anything to do with a scary world Preds. The govt. and NSA just do it because they can. It's the arrogance of power. They've lied to everybody unashamedly and without consequence. They have never proven that this mass collection of meta-data stops terrorism and I doubt it can stop it. The smart ones (terrorists) will adjust and the only ones left spied upon is us. And if the govt wants to know what we think, they just have to ask, it would be a whole lot cheaper.

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01-23-2014, 09:30 AM
  #111
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http://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/23/us...w-nytimes&_r=0

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Watchdog Report Says N.S.A. Program Is Illegal and Should End

WASHINGTON — An independent federal privacy watchdog has concluded that the National Security Agency’s program to collect bulk phone call records has provided only “minimal” benefits in counterterrorism efforts, is illegal and should be shut down.

The findings are laid out in a 238-page report, scheduled for release by Thursday and obtained by The New York Times, that represent the first major public statement by the Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board, which Congress made an independent agency in 2007 and only recently became fully operational.

...

The program “lacks a viable legal foundation under Section 215, implicates constitutional concerns under the First and Fourth Amendments, raises serious threats to privacy and civil liberties as a policy matter, and has shown only limited value,” the report said. “As a result, the board recommends that the government end the program.”
How many government agents have to say this is useless and illegal before anything gets done about it?

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01-23-2014, 10:03 AM
  #112
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How many government agents have to say this is useless and illegal before anything gets done about it?

I think approaching infinity would do the trick.

Nothing will be done. Obama's announcement about fixing the issue was complete smoke and mirrors.

Too bad this guy turned out to be so useless. He had so much public goodwill behind him when he got elected. Wasted.

I still remember making fun of the people fawning over him at the time though. Skepticism has never let me down. At least I got that.

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01-23-2014, 10:04 AM
  #113
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Originally Posted by PredsV82 View Post
what it boils down to is politicians like Obama say things like they do when they are running for president. Then they become president and find out what a scary world it really is, and inevitably they make the decision that they would rather be known as being unable to eliminate things like the NSA program than going down in history as the president who allowed New York City to nuked
Baloney.

What it boils down to is that to get elected in the United States of America you need a billion dollars.

By the time you get to the White House you owe a lot of people a lot of favours.

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01-26-2014, 04:59 AM
  #114
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Two good articles to read if you are interested, a short one (from a US university professor) and a longer one from the Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board (“PCLOB”). The PCLOB is an independent bipartisan agency within the executive branch established by the Implementing Recommendations of the 9/11 Commission Act of 2007.

Does “Espionage Porn” Make Us Stronger?
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There’s nothing wrong with believing—as I do—that Snowden broke the law, and that his actions were at least reckless if not worse. But we’re also considerably better off as a nation for his having done so. And there’s nothing wrong with believing, at the same time, that there are people at the NSA who truly have the best interests of the country at heart and are dedicated to acting within the law. But the NSA should never have begun some of its programs without a robust public debate at the outset. Without Snowden, I would never have been invited to Fort Meade, and all of us, including me, would still be in the dark.
http://justsecurity.org/2014/01/23/e...porn-stronger/


Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board
Report on the Telephone Records Program Conducted under Section 215 of the USA PATRIOT Act and on the Operations of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court

http://justsecurity.org/wp-content/u...rt-1-23-14.pdf

You can read the Intro then jump to the Conclusions if you don't want to read it all.

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01-26-2014, 05:08 AM
  #115
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Baloney.

What it boils down to is that to get elected in the United States of America you need a billion dollars.

By the time you get to the White House you owe a lot of people a lot of favours.
In Canada the PM can be in the pockets of special interests with spending caps on political contributions just by being ideologically onside at the outset (doesn't need Big Money to be onside, he gets it from his wider base that just all think the same). And while the US is having a huge conversation re. espionage, Canada (just as guilty as we've seen from the Snowden leaks) is doing much less (has even less oversight) and we seem just content to listen in on the US conversation.

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01-30-2014, 08:47 AM
  #116
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http://nypost.com/2014/01/29/nsa-lea...l-peace-prize/

STAVANGER, Norway — Two Norwegian politicians have jointly nominated former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden for the 2014 Nobel Peace Prize, saying his disclosures of secret U.S. documents have contributed to making the world more peaceful.

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02-03-2014, 12:25 PM
  #117
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http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=f93_1390833151

Wonder why this wasn't on Faux, MSObamaNBC, 60 Minutes...

Great interview of Snowden though.

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02-03-2014, 12:49 PM
  #118
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Metro Misfits View Post
http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=f93_1390833151

Wonder why this wasn't on Faux, MSObamaNBC, 60 Minutes...

Great interview of Snowden though.
Wow, that just rolls off the tongue. Can't wait for that to catch on.

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02-03-2014, 01:07 PM
  #119
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Originally Posted by Metro Misfits View Post
http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=f93_1390833151

Wonder why this wasn't on Faux, MSObamaNBC, 60 Minutes...

Great interview of Snowden though.
MSNBCommies is better.

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02-03-2014, 01:23 PM
  #120
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Originally Posted by Metro Misfits View Post
http://nypost.com/2014/01/29/nsa-lea...l-peace-prize/

STAVANGER, Norway — Two Norwegian politicians have jointly nominated former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden for the 2014 Nobel Peace Prize, saying his disclosures of secret U.S. documents have contributed to making the world more peaceful.
Hahahaha

What a bunch of BS

Snowden did the US a service in disclosing wrong doing but he also dumped a bunch of sensitive information that had nothing to with the US Federal Government spying on it's own citizens

He's better than Asange (words cannot express how much I hate that guy) I'll give him that but elevate him to sainthood is intellectually dishonest

This isn't much more than mindless US bashing: "Snowden screwed the US Government so, by extension, he's agent for world peace!"

Nuance people

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02-03-2014, 02:15 PM
  #121
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MSNBCommies is better.
Messiahs Should Not Be Commies

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02-03-2014, 02:32 PM
  #122
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Hahahaha

What a bunch of BS

Snowden did the US a service in disclosing wrong doing but he also dumped a bunch of sensitive information that had nothing to with the US Federal Government spying on it's own citizens

He's better than Asange (words cannot express how much I hate that guy) I'll give him that but elevate him to sainthood is intellectually dishonest

This isn't much more than mindless US bashing: "Snowden screwed the US Government so, by extension, he's agent for world peace!"

Nuance people
Well do you think he could have created change without using the tactics he did?

I'm not really that opposed to him being nominated, he definitely helped turn a corner that needed to be turned.

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02-03-2014, 02:36 PM
  #123
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Hahahaha

What a bunch of BS

Snowden did the US a service in disclosing wrong doing but he also dumped a bunch of sensitive information that had nothing to with the US Federal Government spying on it's own citizens
So disclosing how US treats its allies and spies on foreign citizens on mass isn't a good thing? He did a lot more of good towards peace than Obama who got the peace prize for free.

They should just stop giving the peace prize, as it is just a popularity contest without real value.

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02-03-2014, 02:43 PM
  #124
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http://www.economist.com/blogs/democ...se-prosecution

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Mr Snowden has done some good. He has highlighted the NSA’s sloppy security procedures and the danger of “contractorisation”. He has stoked a necessary debate about the nature of meta-data and has shown that using legal means to arm-twist American internet and technology companies into cooperating with the NSA can backfire.

But these benefits are far outweighed by the harm. Here are a few examples of such disclosures:

•how the NSA intercepts e-mails, phone calls and radio transmissions of Taliban fighters in Pakistan; an operation to gauge the loyalties of CIA recruits in Pakistan;
•e-mail intercepts regarding Iran;
•global tracking of cell-phone calls to (as the Washington Post naively put it) “look for unknown associates of known intelligence targets by tracking people whose movements intersect.”
•To the South China Morning Post Snowden revealed details of how the NSA hacks into computers and mobile phones in China and Hong Kong.

Indeed, many of the disclosures seem directly aimed at damaging American diplomacy, or harming American allies. One bunch of leaks concerned Swedish intelligence co-operation with America against Russia. Another concerned similar operations involving Norway. Nobody has explained the public interest in revealing how democracies spy on dictatorships. The answer—as far as can be discerned from Glenn Greenwald, the American lawyer in Brazil who is the custodian of at least some of the cache of stolen material, and the most articulate public defender of their release—is that it is inherently shameful and scandalous for any country to have security, defence or intelligence links with Britain and America.


Last edited by Do Make Say Think: 02-04-2014 at 12:35 AM.
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02-09-2014, 04:34 AM
  #125
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Why Do Governments Abuse Human Rights?
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Given that governments own a monopoly on the legitimate use of force within their borders, it should not surprise us that since its inception, the states has not only repressed some of those who live within its sovereignty claim, but have routinely done so. Yet the dominant narrative, especially in societies governed by democracy, is that governments do not abuse people. It is critical to point out that this is a normative expectation, not a positive statement about the state of the world. As human beings we appear to be innately inclined to tune out abuse and murder of human beings by government, despite the fact that, as Rummel (1994) has documented, government is the top ranked human institution for killing human beings. Further, as the international human rights movement has grown, in fits and starts, from its birth during the enlightenment to become normatively dominant since the 1970s (e.g., Keck &Sikkink 1998, Lauren 1998, Tsutsui&Wotipka 2004, Hunt 2007), governments have shifted from being open about their abuse to actively denying and hiding it.

The result is that there is a remarkable disconnect between facts (governments routinely abuse and even kill) and norms (governments must respect human rights). We begin with a brief explanation of what human rights are, and then explain why we should not be surprised that governments routinely abuse them.
https://www.academia.edu/5737925/Why...e_Human_Rights

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