HFBoards

Go Back   HFBoards > General Hockey Discussion > The Rink
Mobile Hockey's Future Become a Sponsor Site Rules Support Forum vBookie Page 2
The Rink For the not so ready for prime-time players, coaches, referees, and the people that have to live with them. Discuss experiences in local leagues, coaching tips, equipment, and training.

I lost my coach's trust

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old
01-17-2014, 08:17 PM
  #1
Onetimersniper28
Registered User
 
Onetimersniper28's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Montreal
Country: Canada
Posts: 1,846
vCash: 500
I lost my coach's trust

Alright, I'll try to make it short.
I play in a Midget B league, and we haven't lost a game all season. Currently, we play in a tournament, and our next game (tomorrow) is the semi-finals. I am known on my team for my hard shot, the problem is I rarely score goals these days (2 goals in 15 games). Tonight, I hit a new low.

I didn't get a single shot off. At the end of the 2nd period, we were losing 2-0, and I took a bad penalty for cross-checking (deserved). My coach benched me for most of the 3rd period, and we managed to make a great comeback, and won 3-2. I used to be my coach's go-to guy, playing on the wing or at center depending on my team's needs. I have since been demoted to the 3rd line, getting very little power play ice time and used for checking roles.
I know I should sit down and have a little conversation with him. Any advice ?

Onetimersniper28 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-17-2014, 08:26 PM
  #2
Iplayhockehh
Registered User
 
Iplayhockehh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Surrey
Country: Canada
Posts: 278
vCash: 500
The best thing for you to do is work hard in the minutes you are given, earn your coaches trust back by showing him your character and ability to adapt. Versatility in the long run will only earn you more minutes and playing opportunities as you move up the ranks.

Also, it sounds as if you are having trouble scoring. If you believe your role on the team is to be a goal scorer then something has to change. You probably have a hard shot but the goalie might be having a easy time reading it. How big is your snap shot wind up?

Remember that ice time has to be earned. If you want to be the "go to guy" you have to start putting the pack in the back of the net.

Iplayhockehh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-17-2014, 08:40 PM
  #3
Onetimersniper28
Registered User
 
Onetimersniper28's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Montreal
Country: Canada
Posts: 1,846
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Iplayhockehh View Post
The best thing for you to do is work hard in the minutes you are given, earn your coaches trust back by showing him your character and ability to adapt. Versatility in the long run will only earn you more minutes and playing opportunities as you move up the ranks.

Also, it sounds as if you are having trouble scoring. If you believe your role on the team is to be a goal scorer then something has to change. You probably have a hard shot but the goalie might be having a easy time reading it. How big is your snap shot wind up?

Remember that ice time has to be earned. If you want to be the "go to guy" you have to start putting the pack in the back of the net.
Thanks for the tips ! I think I need to regain his trust by focusing on my defensive play.
As for my shot, it's hard enough to beat goalies clean from the blue line (hit the crossbar once with a wrister, and put it an inch above the bar with a slapshot, the goalie didn't even react). My quick release could be improved, I seldom use a snap shot, but my problem maybe lies in getting quality scoring chances by getting open and calling for passes.

Onetimersniper28 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-17-2014, 09:40 PM
  #4
Beezeral
Registered User
 
Beezeral's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Country: United States
Posts: 2,011
vCash: 500
It sounds like you are in a slump. I wouldn't say you have lost the coaches trust, it's just that your play has fallen off and your ice time reflects that.

Has the level of competition increased from last year to this year?

Your conversation with your coach should be about what you can do to get back on track. I wouldn't even mention the decreased ice time.

One thing you could try is going to a pick up game and playing a different role on the ice to see if that snaps you out of your funk. Maybe borrow a friends goalie gear and play goalie for a night.

Beezeral is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-17-2014, 10:33 PM
  #5
Onetimersniper28
Registered User
 
Onetimersniper28's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Montreal
Country: Canada
Posts: 1,846
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beezeral View Post
It sounds like you are in a slump. I wouldn't say you have lost the coaches trust, it's just that your play has fallen off and your ice time reflects that.

Has the level of competition increased from last year to this year?

Your conversation with your coach should be about what you can do to get back on track. I wouldn't even mention the decreased ice time.

One thing you could try is going to a pick up game and playing a different role on the ice to see if that snaps you out of your funk. Maybe borrow a friends goalie gear and play goalie for a night.
First of all, thank you for answering.
The competition level has decreased significantly, we win most of our games by a lopsided score (we have 80 goals for and 14 goals against). My coaches want me to work on releasing the puck faster. They say I would eat goalies alive if I could get my wrist shot off quickly.
The thing I'd like to try to get back to scoring a lot of goals is shooting from farther out. My coach suggested to fire a hard, low and screened wrister from the blue line. I have surprised goalies twice this year shooting from well out.
Playing goalie isn't a great idea, I fear the puck a bit.

Onetimersniper28 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-18-2014, 03:39 AM
  #6
Iplayhockehh
Registered User
 
Iplayhockehh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Surrey
Country: Canada
Posts: 278
vCash: 500
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kLr63oWYxWk

This video will teach you how to get a quicker shot off. Also, a move I like to do(as a right handed shot) is come down the left wing, get a step on the defenseman and then cut right into the middle and shoot. Ovechkin did this really well in his early years maybe you can find a clip of it on youtube.

As for getting in position, you need to keep your feet moving and find the open ice and yell for the puck. Even if the puck isn't coming to you 100% of the time in these positions it will eventually come to you. Doing this will allow you to get more shots off during the game.

Also, when you are moving around like this you are opening lanes for your teammates as someone from the opposing team will have to defend you and follow you even if you don't have the puck.

Kinda confusing concept, let me know if you have any more questions!

Iplayhockehh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-18-2014, 06:13 AM
  #7
Canadiens1958
Registered User
 
Canadiens1958's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 10,864
vCash: 500
Midget

You are playing your first, second or last year midget?

Canadiens1958 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-18-2014, 07:25 AM
  #8
Beezeral
Registered User
 
Beezeral's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Country: United States
Posts: 2,011
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Onetimersniper28 View Post
First of all, thank you for answering.
The competition level has decreased significantly, we win most of our games by a lopsided score (we have 80 goals for and 14 goals against). My coaches want me to work on releasing the puck faster. They say I would eat goalies alive if I could get my wrist shot off quickly.
The thing I'd like to try to get back to scoring a lot of goals is shooting from farther out. My coach suggested to fire a hard, low and screened wrister from the blue line. I have surprised goalies twice this year shooting from well out.
Playing goalie isn't a great idea, I fear the puck a bit.
Well a fear of the puck might be part of the problem. You may be subconsciously avoiding the front of the net in fear of getting hit by a slap shot from one of your defenseman. Playing goalie a bit is one of the best ways to increase your hockey IQ. You get a different perspective of the game and you start to see where forwards can position themselves to be in optimal scoring locations.

I have been a goalie all my life, but on the rare occasions I do skate out, I can hold my own against players much more skilled than I am, because I always know where to be on the ice and am not afraid to screen the goalie and pick up garbage goals on deflections or rebounds. It really is a skill to be able to stand in front of the goalie and screen him while not putting yourself in position to block the shot for him.

Obviously this is a very uninformed opinion because I haven't seen you play, but I don't think your release is the issue. If your release was good enough to be a top line player last season, and the competition is worse this year, then something else is the main issue.

Beezeral is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-18-2014, 10:00 AM
  #9
Onetimersniper28
Registered User
 
Onetimersniper28's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Montreal
Country: Canada
Posts: 1,846
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Canadiens1958 View Post
You are playing your first, second or last year midget?
I'm playing my last year, I'm sort of a veteran for my team, and I'm trying to take my game to the next level for next year in Junior.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Beezeral View Post
Well a fear of the puck might be part of the problem. You may be subconsciously avoiding the front of the net in fear of getting hit by a slap shot from one of your defenseman. Playing goalie a bit is one of the best ways to increase your hockey IQ. You get a different perspective of the game and you start to see where forwards can position themselves to be in optimal scoring locations.

I have been a goalie all my life, but on the rare occasions I do skate out, I can hold my own against players much more skilled than I am, because I always know where to be on the ice and am not afraid to screen the goalie and pick up garbage goals on deflections or rebounds. It really is a skill to be able to stand in front of the goalie and screen him while not putting yourself in position to block the shot for him.

Obviously this is a very uninformed opinion because I haven't seen you play, but I don't think your release is the issue. If your release was good enough to be a top line player last season, and the competition is worse this year, then something else is the main issue.
I can override my fear of the puck if I know the point man will shoot low, but some of our defensemen are careless with the puck. We had a game on Tuesday, and when I fed a one timer to one of our guys, he unleashed a wicked bomb 6" in the air. I could hear our assistant coach yelling at him from the bench . I'll start blocking shots defensively to get used to the puck hitting me.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Iplayhockehh View Post
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kLr63oWYxWk

This video will teach you how to get a quicker shot off. Also, a move I like to do(as a right handed shot) is come down the left wing, get a step on the defenseman and then cut right into the middle and shoot. Ovechkin did this really well in his early years maybe you can find a clip of it on youtube.

As for getting in position, you need to keep your feet moving and find the open ice and yell for the puck. Even if the puck isn't coming to you 100% of the time in these positions it will eventually come to you. Doing this will allow you to get more shots off during the game.

Also, when you are moving around like this you are opening lanes for your teammates as someone from the opposing team will have to defend you and follow you even if you don't have the puck.

Kinda confusing concept, let me know if you have any more questions!
Great video ! It's amazing to see how even NHL players can sometimes have trouble with releasing the puck quickly . Notice how he only takes snapshots. He also does not hesitate to shoot off the wrong foot. Moving my feet is very important, I definitely need to work on my acceleration from a standstill position, to get ahead of opposing players. That will increase the number of odd man rushes, breakaways...


This afternoon, I have a game, I'll try to do everything you said, and we'll see if all my hard work pays off.

Onetimersniper28 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-18-2014, 10:52 AM
  #10
Canadiens1958
Registered User
 
Canadiens1958's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 10,864
vCash: 500
Growing Your Game

Quote:
Originally Posted by Onetimersniper28 View Post
I'm playing my last year, I'm sort of a veteran for my team, and I'm trying to take my game to the next level for next year in Junior.
Last year midget means you have been playing against the same players coaches and teams for awhile. Chances are that offensively you have become predictable. Likewise defensively especially if you have played hockey in a strict system.

Talk with your coach about improving your game by polishing your offensive and defensive strengths plus adding variety. Offensively you description is that of a raw shooter. Consider adding variety - backhand shot and move, improved slot play, going to the net for deflections, tip-ins and rebounds.

Going to junior next year you will be playing against players perhaps 3-4 years older and if you do not bring offensive and defensive variety the level of play will be very difficult.

Canadiens1958 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-18-2014, 11:02 AM
  #11
ccarrigan
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 49
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Onetimersniper28 View Post
I can override my fear of the puck if I know the point man will shoot low, but some of our defensemen are careless with the puck. We had a game on Tuesday, and when I fed a one timer to one of our guys, he unleashed a wicked bomb 6" in the air. I could hear our assistant coach yelling at him from the bench . I'll start blocking shots defensively to get used to the puck hitting me.
.
What are your pads like? I only ask because I play in a league with some former AAA and junior players, and I'll step in front of a shot and dig in at the net. Yeah, a bad placement can hurt, but if I get hit anywhere waist down I don't usually feel it. My stomach and arms can take a beating sometimes though.

There's also a video of an NHL player working on his snapshot quick release off his inside foot and it really stepped up his game. I'll see if I can find it.

EDIT: THE LINKED VIDEO ABOVE IS THE ONE I WAS TALKING ABOUT. I'M A DUMMY.


Last edited by ccarrigan: 01-18-2014 at 11:10 AM.
ccarrigan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-18-2014, 11:32 AM
  #12
smcgreg
Registered User
 
smcgreg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Hockeytown??
Country: United States
Posts: 66
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Onetimersniper28 View Post
I'm playing my last year, I'm sort of a veteran for my team, and I'm trying to take my game to the next level for next year in Junior.



This afternoon, I have a game, I'll try to do everything you said, and we'll see if all my hard work pays off.
If you try and change things, don't do EVERYTHING at once. Focus on ONE thing at a time. That will make the change more effective and likely to stick. Once you can incorporate one change, then move on to another. Certainly, if an opportunity presents itself, don't avoid doing something, but intentionally thinking of changing a number of things at once can make things worse and lead to a tail spin where you lose orientation about what has worked in the past.

smcgreg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-18-2014, 05:26 PM
  #13
Iplayhockehh
Registered User
 
Iplayhockehh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Surrey
Country: Canada
Posts: 278
vCash: 500
Lots of good advice being thrown around in this thread. Also, OP good observation noticing the player in the video only takes snap shots and doesn't hesitate to shoot off the back leg. If you watch the NHL nowadays, the best shooters have worked with the same coach in the video(Patrick Kane, Jonathon Tavares). His techniques are literally the future of hockey. Nowadays there simply is not enough time for a big wind up wrist shot or slapper. Almost no one at the higher levels, even junior B, uses a wrist shot anymore, it's all snappers.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x1HGT8n-n7o

here is another video that I learned from that I feel could be of use to you.

Iplayhockehh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-18-2014, 07:54 PM
  #14
Onetimersniper28
Registered User
 
Onetimersniper28's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Montreal
Country: Canada
Posts: 1,846
vCash: 500
Wow, I didn't expect so many people to be answering my call, thanks guys !

So we were eliminated tonight from the tournament, we lost 3-1. The reason we lost is that we only had 10 players, and they had a full lineup. I got plenty of ice time, especially on the power play.

Didn't score but I had some quality chances, almost capitalized twice, with a quick snapper trickling through the goalie's legs. I deflected some pucks (unusual for me), drove to the net and poked at some rebounds. My coach liked that I stayed towards the high slot when the two other forwards were digging for the puck behind the net, which allowed me to prevent a 2 on 1 afterwards.

Defensively, blocked 3 shots, and one that left me in pain on the ice, struggling to get back to the bench. Coach's reaction :"Good job taking one for the team, but in 2 minutes, you're back on the ice no matter what." Losing 2-0 in the final minute of the game, coach sent me as the 6th attacker, and he benched a teammate instead. We scored on that shift, but they put the game away by hitting the empty net.

Finally, I sat down with the coach and asked him what I needed to do to realize my full potential. He said that I had all the skills required to shine, but that I had a tendency to make bad decisions (passing when I have a good shooting lane, vice versa). As for being on the 2nd/3rd line, he said that the lines weren't ranked, and that the first line happened to be the top line because it has our best player by far (the guy is playing 2 levels below his skill level, he dominates the ice and scores every game), and the two other guys that developed a chemistry with him. He said "You're cold offensively right now, but when you get hot, the goals will come again."

I'm pretty confident going forward, now that I know he still trusts me.

Onetimersniper28 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-20-2014, 10:33 AM
  #15
CornKicker
Locked Out
 
CornKicker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Country: Canada
Posts: 6,431
vCash: 50
good to hear you are headed in the right direction, now to bust that slump......


Last edited by Canadiens1958: 01-20-2014 at 10:44 AM. Reason: let's no go in that direction.
CornKicker is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Forum Jump


Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:01 AM.

monitoring_string = "e4251c93e2ba248d29da988d93bf5144"
Contact Us - HFBoards - Archive - Privacy Statement - Terms of Use - Advertise - Top - AdChoices

vBulletin Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
HFBoards.com is a property of CraveOnline Media, LLC, an Evolve Media, LLC company. 2014 All Rights Reserved.