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Possible to play in adult league with only being able to stop one way?

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Old
02-24-2014, 05:19 PM
  #1
Sykora|39
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Possible to play in adult league with only being able to stop one way?

I can only stop with my left skate in front

I haven't been on skates in 10+ years but after a few stick & puck sessions I've picked it up quick and already feel like I'm a strong skater. I realize how incredibly stupid that sounds but I was blown away.

The only thing I can't do is stop with my right foot. I always end up just cutting a quick U-turn to get out of trouble.

I feel like in a game though I couldn't get away with that.

What do you guys think? Our adult leagues slow paced enough where I could get away with it or am I asking for trouble.

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02-24-2014, 05:44 PM
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SeenSchenn2
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Absolutely. I can't stop well with my left-foot as well so I avoid it, and not to boast or anything but I'm a fast and smooth skater. Even when I was younger and played competitive I didn't stop on my left foot.

You just stop and ensure you position yourself to still make a play.

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02-24-2014, 05:55 PM
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Doctor No
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Depends upon the adult league, to be quite honest.

For the lowest Denver area leagues ("ankle benders"), yes.

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02-24-2014, 06:06 PM
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octopi
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I played rec shinny for years like that.

Unfortunately my reflexes are terrible

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02-24-2014, 06:15 PM
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I play high school hockey in Massachusetts and can only stop on my right side.

I am so used to stopping on my right side that I don't even think about stopping on my left side.

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02-24-2014, 07:26 PM
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Terry Yake
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i've played ice hockey for almost 16 years now and still can't stop on my right skate, just couldn't ever get the hang of it so i stopped trying to learn since i was playing just fine

unless you're playing in an elite or gold league there is nothing to worry about. i've played in bronze and silver leagues for years and i've never had a problem. honestly, i often forget that i can't stop on my right since i'm so used to just stopping on my left

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02-24-2014, 10:23 PM
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LarryO
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sykora|39 View Post
I can only stop with my left skate in front

I haven't been on skates in 10+ years but after a few stick & puck sessions I've picked it up quick and already feel like I'm a strong skater. I realize how incredibly stupid that sounds but I was blown away.

The only thing I can't do is stop with my right foot. I always end up just cutting a quick U-turn to get out of trouble.

I feel like in a game though I couldn't get away with that.

What do you guys think? Our adult leagues slow paced enough where I could get away with it or am I asking for trouble.
If you don't mind being out-maneuvered by guys who can stop both sides, then settle for what little you have. If you're playing against guys who also can only stop on one side, then that would be an even better reason for you to learn how to stop on both sides so you could out-maneuver them. I could never settle for mediocrity if I knew I could do better, so I learned and practiced stopping both sides.

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02-24-2014, 10:26 PM
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Ozz
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Heck, I know people who can't stop AT ALL that play. Granted, they are in the lower divisions, but that doesn't matter much. It's not like you're likely to be up against guys who can skate 50x better than you.

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02-24-2014, 10:46 PM
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CanucksSayEh
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Stopping is a luxury, not a necessity. Same as backwards skating. After a few games I may get rusty on my left skate edges, and backwards transitions, just because I almost never use them as a right winger. I try to practice during warm up a bit, and work on it over the offseason. Then it all regresses over the winter again lol.

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02-24-2014, 11:02 PM
  #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CanucksSayEh View Post
Stopping is a luxury, not a necessity. Same as backwards skating. After a few games I may get rusty on my left skate edges, and backwards transitions, just because I almost never use them as a right winger. I try to practice during warm up a bit, and work on it over the offseason. Then it all regresses over the winter again lol.
SMH at reading this....unless one plans at skating 3 mph and never trying to capture loose pucks, especially in the corners, how can one consider stopping to be a "luxury"? Let alone what if another noob is coming directly at you, that chances are given that they cannot stop and likely never look up at anything but the puck, to avoid getting into a collison?

I would urge anyone who wants to play and be useful, let alone successful, at any league level to be able to stop on both sides instinctively, and instantly. Do the blueline to blueline drills, whatever it takes. Waiting one season to get skilled at doing so will make you a much more effective player.

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02-24-2014, 11:12 PM
  #11
Ozz
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nystromshairstylist View Post
SMH at reading this....unless one plans at skating 3 mph and never trying to capture loose pucks, especially in the corners, how can one consider stopping to be a "luxury"? Let alone what if another noob is coming directly at you, that chances are given that they cannot stop and likely never look up at anything but the puck, to avoid getting into a collison?

I would urge anyone who wants to play and be useful, let alone successful, at any league level to be able to stop on both sides instinctively, and instantly. Do the blueline to blueline drills, whatever it takes. Waiting one season to get skilled at doing so will make you a much more effective player.
I also agree with this. It shouldn't stop you from getting into it, but on the same note I wouldn't suggest settling on a lack of certain abilities. Practice practice practice.

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Old
02-24-2014, 11:27 PM
  #12
Islespuck89
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It won't matter I can only stop on my left side. If there is no other choice I will stop on my right it wont be pretty it will get me out of harms way. Trust me im like you with the stopping, I assure you if its massive collision w/ another player the boards or the goal I guarantee you will be able to stop better than you have on your right side!

Maybe once every 20-25 games I am forced to use my right side. I play wing for this reason, if your a center you will get beat assuming you play the correct way and getting ya butt back to be the 3rd dman.

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02-24-2014, 11:41 PM
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RandV
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Well at least you can stop!

I couldn't when I first got into it. Though I finally learned it pretty quickly, and I guess since I had no ingrained habits once I got over that first hump didn't have a problem getting both sides down.

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02-24-2014, 11:47 PM
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tarheelhockey
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1) Yes, you can play with that limitation.

2) I know where you're coming from, I used to do the U-turns too... but really and truly, it's not that hard to learn how to stop both ways. You just have to keep trying to do it until it sticks. Remember when you were first learning to do a hockey stop on your strong side, and it seemed hard at first but after a bunch of tries you finally got it? Same thing happens on the weak side. It's just a matter of time and repetition, go skate on a regular basis and you'll figure it out!

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02-25-2014, 01:32 AM
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Pacifist Goon
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Depends why you want to play. Not the greatest skater and never going to be a world beater, but I understand the importance of skating. It's the key to playing and the key to getting better, both getting ahead of those at your level and catching up to those above you, so I don't know why anyone would be happy to play with such limitations on themselves. You should always want to get better and improve no matter what level you're at.

I started out stopping on one side and couldn't get the hang of both sides. Not having played for a number of years, have started back recently and almost like a beginner again. Just concentrating on weight distribution and edge control. Getting those right has fixed the stopping deficiencies in no time.

Now it's like 'duh', how come I didn't get this right earlier. Was a very minor adjustment.

As the skating improves, the stickhandling and situational awareness on the ice improves too.

Practice, practice, practice.

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02-25-2014, 06:20 AM
  #16
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Certainly you can. Obviously, I wouldn't just give up trying to learn it though.
I think the biggest thing is to be mindful of your limitations and respectful of the other players on the ice in both your opponents and teammates. While you don't have to be Guy Lafleur out there, nobody wants to get injured by the guy that can't skate well(or stop), because he wasn't mindful of what he was doing out there.

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02-25-2014, 07:09 AM
  #17
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I'm depending on plenty of guys I play with on LTP not bothering to learn their weak side stuff. That way I get to improve loads relative to them. I already see the difference between me (practicing 3 - 4 times a week) and the guys who don't practice between hockey training.

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02-25-2014, 10:58 AM
  #18
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Some of the guys in the lowest league I play in can barely start.

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02-25-2014, 11:49 AM
  #19
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People here are reading too much into this.

The simple answer is: "yes you can play with stopping one way (or not at all)"

BUT

if you want to get better and play at a higher lvl, stopping both is a MUST.

depends on where you want your ceiling to be. Also, it's safer and easier to protect yourself when you can stop both ways. Body positioning and reaction time is the issue here when you want to prevent a collision.

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02-25-2014, 11:51 AM
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Jarick
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For beginner hockey, yes it's fine!

But really try to work on it in your free time. When I played as a kid, I could only stop on one side, and not very well. As an adult, it took me many weeks of working to stop on both sides. Literally going to open skate looking silly holding the boards to learn to stop, and then working on outdoor rinks as well.

You'll probably always have a strong and weak side for stopping, but any progress you can make to improving is good!

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Old
02-25-2014, 04:41 PM
  #21
izzy3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sykora|39 View Post
[...] or am I asking for trouble.
Well simply put it's better to be able to stop on both sides, but I know a lot of guys who can't and still play, and are pretty useful for the team. That said, the better you skate the more options will be available to you, so even if you decide to play it should not mean that you'd stop working on your skating and everything else you need.

But if you have the itch, well, you can go for it, just work on the weak stuff as well.

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02-25-2014, 04:53 PM
  #22
Onetimersniper28
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Did you practice scraping the ice from a standstill position ? I find it helps to build muscle memory.
Also, if you can't do crossovers both ways, you can get away with it in lower level leagues.

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02-25-2014, 05:32 PM
  #23
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I just started playing hockey in September (6 months ago). When I started, I could only skate forward, crossover left, and stop left. So yes it is enough to start with.

Now, if you're like me you'll have a desire to improve, and also quickly realize your skating skills are insufficient to do what you want to on the ice. So you'll play and practice and work on your skills, and just be getting out there and playing regularly you'll improve, especially if you push yourself. In the 6 months since I started, playing twice a week I can now crossover both ways forwards, stop both ways, skate backwards, and am working on my backwards crossovers (I play D so backwards skating is a big focus for me).

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02-25-2014, 07:06 PM
  #24
scryan
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You can totally learn to drive making only right hand turns... and even fairly safely as long as you plan right. Just make 3 right hand turns for any left you plan to make.

If you don't wanna drive around like an idiot though, practice those lefts.
Same thing is pretty much true here. You could also learn to play with out ever taking a back handed shot.

Practice will make you be able to do these things though.

For the simple issue of "Can I play hockey"?
YES. Adult hockey is a far cry from the NHL, scoot yourself along the ice on your knees if that is what it takes. Just look to improve. I'll tell you right now the first good few times I stood in front of a net I only got there stopping myself on the crossbar.


Do what you can with what you have, and repeat the things your bad at as often as possible.

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Old
02-26-2014, 08:33 AM
  #25
chapel
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yeah, play in D-level. I see plenty of D-levels who are still in the 'learn to skate' level.
either way, work on both sides... it's an important skill to have.

keep your knees bent and squat into it if you feel like you're not stable. Get as low as you can when stopping to increase your stopping power. Work both sides equally. When you get low, you also reduce the risk of upending yourself (catch an edge and go ass over teakettle)... normally you'll lowside (skates will slide out from under you and you'll baseball slide).

A fun game to play to practice stopping is to see how high you can get the ice to spray on the boards. When you can finally get really low you'll be able to hit the glass from within a few feet because you're digging in so well.
It's also good for blinding goalies... (sorry goalies)

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