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Becoming a scout

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Old
02-19-2007, 10:14 PM
  #1
Malice430
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Becoming a scout

I was wondering how one goes about getting a job as a scout. I know that a good bunch are former players, but how would someone else become one. I would love to be able to travel across canada, europe and russia just watching games and scouting talent.

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Old
02-19-2007, 10:18 PM
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Timeless Winter
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good question, being a scout would be my dream job, wish I had an answer for you, hopefully someone does.

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Old
02-19-2007, 10:20 PM
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1. have connections

thats basically it, folks

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Old
02-19-2007, 10:22 PM
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Blind Gardien
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Don't do it as part of a midlife crisis, anyway. Start young, no ties, no family commitments, get with your local team at whatever level and put in a gazillion hours working for peanuts (or gratis) at whatever level that is. Then you know if you can handle it, plus maybe if you're really lucky you stumble across the paths of people who can gradually hook you up to the next level, if you're diligent and lucky enough.

Well, I don't say that as someone who did it, but rather as someone who sat in a lot of junior rinks occasionally stumbling across others who were trying to do it. (And occasionally being tempted, but never thinking it ultimately made sense.)

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Old
02-19-2007, 10:52 PM
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Circulartheory
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I wish i knew...but im still in high school so i have time lol.

My plan is to:
1. Get an internship at a Junior hockey team
2. Coach Div 1 High School over here in Connecticut
3. Get Connections

Thats my plan, you steal it, i'll stab you lmao j/k not but seriously i will

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Old
02-19-2007, 10:55 PM
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Rise from the Ashes
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You guys ever heard of sports management worldwide? its supposed to train you to be a scout and others.

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02-19-2007, 11:05 PM
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montreal
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Montreal Russians View Post
You guys ever heard of sports management worldwide? its supposed to train you to be a scout and others.
Yes, I know one of the instructors, it's new though and expensive. From what I've heard they have good contacts but in way does that mean you will get the job you want.

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Old
02-19-2007, 11:43 PM
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Kevin Forbes
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From what I've heard, it's not nearly as glamourous as it sounds. I know a lot of you are thinking, "yeah? so what! long hours don't matter because I'll be watching hockey! I don't have a family and I want to travel, even if they don't pay me much!"

But you're not watching hockey, you're watching players. So you're not paying attention to the competition of the game or one team playing against another, you're focusing too closely for any of that. From what I've heard, it almost sucks the fun out of watching the game at all because it becomes habitual to look for the little things instead of being able to enjoy the full thing.

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Old
02-19-2007, 11:48 PM
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WheatiesHockey
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Scouting can be a great deal of fun and a whole lot of hard work on your part. If you can start small with Junior B or Junior A teams and work your way up the ranks so much the better and easier. If anything a Junior team or small college would be looking for boots on the ground in your local area.
By and large much of the work is information gathering and assessment, much the same way as intelligence work is to the military. What is actually done with your reports, assessments and evaluations is really up to team management and that is where your influence will start or stop.

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02-20-2007, 12:54 AM
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Malice430
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blind Gardien View Post
Don't do it as part of a midlife crisis, anyway. Start young, no ties, no family commitments,
dont wory. im 25 and single. too early for a midlife crisis

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Old
02-20-2007, 12:57 AM
  #11
Malice430
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevin Forbes View Post
From what I've heard, it's not nearly as glamourous as it sounds. I know a lot of you are thinking, "yeah? so what! long hours don't matter because I'll be watching hockey! I don't have a family and I want to travel, even if they don't pay me much!"

But you're not watching hockey, you're watching players. So you're not paying attention to the competition of the game or one team playing against another, you're focusing too closely for any of that. From what I've heard, it almost sucks the fun out of watching the game at all because it becomes habitual to look for the little things instead of being able to enjoy the full thing.
thats usually what i do anyways. im a kings fan, but i go to ducks game just to watch a hockey game. the outcome doesnt matter to me, so i will check out certain traits by a few players each period.. see what they do on a shift-by-shift basis.

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Old
02-20-2007, 12:59 AM
  #12
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It is never too early to get a crisis going. Panic now , 25 could be half your life if you develop cancer etc.

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Old
02-20-2007, 01:52 AM
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dafranchz
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Another thing you need to realize is that most scouts are regional. Generally, only upper management does the majority - and the "far" - traveling (and that is usually to sign someone).

Most of the times, unless you have an Ovechkin or Malkin who generates a lot of hype and media coverage in Europe, chances are a lot of the management probably has not even see a player in action, in person before they call his name at the podium. It goes back to....

Quote:
Originally Posted by WheatiesHockey
What is actually done with your reports, assessments and evaluations is really up to team management and that is where your influence will start or stop.

Here are some thoughts to kick around....


Everyone's got an idea and opinion. How are you going to standout on your own? What are you going to tell someone they don't already know? The top talent is easy to spot...its the kids that appear to be less seasoned that you need to be able to find. The ones that for some reason have the tools but are missing the toolbox. You have to be able to identify those players and be able to help them along -or- believe over time that they will have what it takes. You also have to be able to convince your bosses that for "this" reason or "that" reason, player x is going to blossom into one heck of a player. If its not that obvious, you need to be ready to explain why this guy is going to fit into the program. You need to explain (with conviction) the net benefit will he bring down the road.

Also take into consideration that it goes a lot farther then what you see on the ice. Homework is homework and there are no shortcuts. Only the scouts that take the time and show the right interest find the right ones. What kind of basic grasps do you have on Sociology, Psychology, and communication (specifically verbal and non-verbal communication)? It honestly goes a lot deeper than pointing and saying, "yeah he's got it." The more prepared you are, the more effective you'll be at spotting them.

Remember, the higher the stakes...the more cutthroat it is. It’s a business. Nothing personal…just business. Ultimately, we're talking about the return performance on an initial investment. Owners, GM and coaches can't afford to be stuck in playing the high risk, high reward carousel when it comes to drafting and developing players. You're going to need to be able to sneak a card in there every once in a while. Not everyone can be a top-flight player but that doesn't mean there isn't a place or a role those "right" guys can't fill down the road.

I'm not the expert by any means... but I've been paying attention during the conversations, interviews, meetings and travel for HF over the last 3 or so years.

-Side note-
If you want to travel Europe...there's always college and the exchange program.


Last edited by dafranchz: 02-20-2007 at 01:58 AM.
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Old
02-20-2007, 01:56 AM
  #14
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http://www.sportsmanagementworldwide...n_hockeygm.asp

this site offers the course to be a GM and a scout or anything related to stuff like being a scout, GM and a players agent.


heres ur chance guys!

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Old
02-20-2007, 04:43 AM
  #15
montreal
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Malice430 View Post
thats usually what i do anyways. im a kings fan, but i go to ducks game just to watch a hockey game. the outcome doesnt matter to me, so i will check out certain traits by a few players each period.. see what they do on a shift-by-shift basis.
The more hockey you watch the better but something to consider is that you'll likely be watching bad hockey. Lets say you were to catch on with ISS, you'll likely be scouting '91's or '92's or younger. So you would be watching HS hockey or that level (since I am on the east I don't know a lot about the programs and levels of hockey in Californa) But if it's something you really want then go for it and good luck.

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Old
02-20-2007, 10:13 AM
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Malice430
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Originally Posted by PanniniClaus View Post
It is never too early to get a crisis going. Panic now , 25 could be half your life if you develop cancer etc.
for all i know, 13 could have been it too. i dont worry about those kinda things.

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Old
02-20-2007, 10:15 AM
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Malice430
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Quote:
Originally Posted by montreal View Post
The more hockey you watch the better but something to consider is that you'll likely be watching bad hockey. Lets say you were to catch on with ISS, you'll likely be scouting '91's or '92's or younger. So you would be watching HS hockey or that level (since I am on the east I don't know a lot about the programs and levels of hockey in Californa) But if it's something you really want then go for it and good luck.
i wouldnt mind that. after my hockey games I sometimes stay and watch some of the pee-wee or bantam league games at my rink.

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02-20-2007, 10:25 AM
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Anything is obtainable.. however, aiming to become a professional scout if you have not played professional hockey yoursef is unrealistic, IMO.

You should assess yourself and decide what career goals are realistic for you.

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02-20-2007, 10:31 AM
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Anthony Mauro
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i wouldnt mind that. after my hockey games I sometimes stay and watch some of the pee-wee or bantam league games at my rink.
Ok, so you say you stay for those games with different variables added on like a real scout. So not only are you not playing joy hockey beforehand, you are just finishing a grueling three hour drive from watching an earlier game, where you watched a grinder with no skill and waited for him to get his 7.5 minutes of ice. During pre-game and warmups you are frantically trying to start/finish the report from the previous game. When the next game is over, you have to get someplace where you can enter the detailed scouting reports for your head scout within a ridiculous time limit. All this with having only hot dogs and pretzels in your system the past week.

Trust me, what makes you different than the thousands of scouts that do it? It becomes a mundane task, chore to do. But the love for the game is what keeps these guys from leaving the job outright, not enjoying their work. I'm sure if you had any idea of what scouting entails you'd be singing a different tune.

It's real easy never having done to it to come out and say, "well, I don't understand what their problem is?" "I love hockey, how could you not love scouting?" But the environment that is created becomes outright disgusting at times. Low pay, long hours, ridiculous demands. All things that wear the luster off of the game you really love.

Try to get into a good spot first. Start out easy, doing volunteer work on the side with no real commitment to a league/team. You'll see if you really want to commit to it. All the while you can have a good time with hockey still doing a few games here and there. Honestly, I feel the majority of scouts do it as a second job and a hobby.

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Old
02-20-2007, 10:37 AM
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Anthony Mauro
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Originally Posted by Nitso View Post
Anything is obtainable.. however, aiming to become a professional scout if you have not played professional hockey yoursef is unrealistic, IMO.

You should assess yourself and decide what career goals are realistic for you.
Not true at all. Someone with no connections in the game just needs to establish one good in and then have the desire, will, and talent to prove they have just as good a hockey mind as an ex-athlete.

It can be done without having played before.

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02-20-2007, 10:46 AM
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Scouting is an old boy network that former players use to keep the checks coming in after they can't play anymore. If you don't believe me, go to the NHL draft. Hang around there and you'd be shocked some of the things you'll hear just pretending not to pay attention. I don't think half these "pro-scouts" even go to games. I've heard them ask each other questions they should obviously know. Hook onto your local college or junior team and follow them and their opponents really close. Make a report about players you think are legit and why. Then send a copy to all 30 teams in the league, and do it with religious dedication and frequency. When they send you a letter to stop, ignore it. Eventually you will be known as the "crazy guy" who sends the scouting reports. Unless one of them turns out to hit. Then you'll be the guy who saw something nobody else knew was there. Be careful who you send in, b/c you can't keep screaming about every guy being the big one or they'll tune you out. If it's really what you want to do with your life, then you can outshine the other guys by working harder, and proving that you know what you're doing and didn't need any connections. Scouts come and go all the time. If you seriously keep plugging away, and not for a year but for a long haul, you may just get a shot.

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Old
02-20-2007, 11:20 AM
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The best way to become a good scout is to join cubs first. Can you tie a granny knot.

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Old
02-20-2007, 11:34 AM
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it also helps if you are a recognized or famous former NHLer or junior player

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02-20-2007, 11:50 AM
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N Bahn Ahden
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevin Forbes View Post
But you're not watching hockey, you're watching players. So you're not paying attention to the competition of the game or one team playing against another, you're focusing too closely for any of that. From what I've heard, it almost sucks the fun out of watching the game at all because it becomes habitual to look for the little things instead of being able to enjoy the full thing.
This is an interesting point. I've been trying to avoid being that amateur "HF" scout when watching games because after doing that for a few years I realised that I no longer enjoyed watching hockey for the game.

As for the original question, I asked Blair Mackasey a couple years ago in an email (which I thought I saved but apparently didn't). Basically he said to get involved with the local junior team and work from there.

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Old
02-20-2007, 01:06 PM
  #25
ISS Hockey
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Malice430 View Post
I was wondering how one goes about getting a job as a scout. I know that a good bunch are former players, but how would someone else become one. I would love to be able to travel across canada, europe and russia just watching games and scouting talent.
Quote:
Originally Posted by SML View Post
Scouting is an old boy network that former players use to keep the checks coming in after they can't play anymore. If you don't believe me, go to the NHL draft. Hang around there and you'd be shocked some of the things you'll hear just pretending not to pay attention. I don't think half these "pro-scouts" even go to games. I've heard them ask each other questions they should obviously know. Hook onto your local college or junior team and follow them and their opponents really close. Make a report about players you think are legit and why. Then send a copy to all 30 teams in the league, and do it with religious dedication and frequency. When they send you a letter to stop, ignore it. Eventually you will be known as the "crazy guy" who sends the scouting reports. Unless one of them turns out to hit. Then you'll be the guy who saw something nobody else knew was there. Be careful who you send in, b/c you can't keep screaming about every guy being the big one or they'll tune you out. If it's really what you want to do with your life, then you can outshine the other guys by working harder, and proving that you know what you're doing and didn't need any connections. Scouts come and go all the time. If you seriously keep plugging away, and not for a year but for a long haul, you may just get a shot.
SML makes some good points. It's similar to what I tell people when they drop us an e-mail. This happens quite a bit, so I've prepared a little bit of advice. Let me preface this by saying I am not a scout, but I this method helped me get my job with ISS.

Here's my golden advice:
There is no surefire way to become a hockey scout. Get your foot in the door, make a connection, do a little work for free if you have to. The bottom line is you have to impress upon someone that you can evaluate hockey talent. There are many ways you can go about doing that. Having a coaching background is one way to establish this. Start at the bottom and work your way up. Unless you're the son of an NHL GM, there is no fast elevator to the top.


Last edited by ISS Hockey: 04-02-2007 at 10:27 PM.
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