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Private 1 on 1 lessons for 9 year old?

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03-11-2014, 03:47 PM
  #1
NativeHockey77*
 
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Private 1 on 1 lessons for 9 year old?

Do you guys think its too early for a 9 year old to take 1 on 1 training with an ex-pro?

I'm considering doing this as the 9 year old is trying out for an Atom Development team in his 2nd year Atoms. He got cut trying out in his first year atoms and he's indicated that the Development team would be funner rather than playing in house another year.

I'm just wondering if its too early for 1 on 1 training and if it would be much more beneficial than just getting ice times practicing around?

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03-11-2014, 04:32 PM
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redbranch
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I think it's perfectly fine, as long as the lessons are kept to the fundamentals, and kept fun.

My son, who just turned 9, loves private lessons, as long as they are with certain coaches. Works hard, but comes off the ice grinning. The coach pushes him, but knows how to keep it fun, and just works on one or two things tops during the lesson. That way, he comes out of the lesson with something he can see/feel is new, or improved. Keeps it positive

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03-11-2014, 05:40 PM
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Jive Time
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I agree with everything redbranch said.

Both of my kids that play have had private lessons to help cement the fundamentals. They both took lessons from age 7 to 10 usually in 8 week cycles a few times a year.

The child must have fun with this or your money will go down the drain. I was very fortunate to have access to a couple of really good coaches that work well with kids.

If they continue to play, they will have the tools to succeed and that's what I was shooting for.

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03-11-2014, 05:59 PM
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I agree with you guys! The 9 year old enjoys the instructors classes and is great with kids. Thanks for the responses

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03-17-2014, 01:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crazyh0rse View Post
Do you guys think its too early for a 9 year old to take 1 on 1 training with an ex-pro?

I'm considering doing this as the 9 year old is trying out for an Atom Development team in his 2nd year Atoms. He got cut trying out in his first year atoms and he's indicated that the Development team would be funner rather than playing in house another year.

I'm just wondering if its too early for 1 on 1 training and if it would be much more beneficial than just getting ice times practicing around?
No way is it to young. I mean especially such a simple thing as this. I think too many parents are worried about "forcing" their kids into sports. Your child obviously likes hockey, I think, so why not give him as many things as you can to help him love it more and be better. Every one wants to be better at the things they like...

which brings me to my next point. Not only is it great for him to get better at something but to learn life lessons like the value of hard work and training.

No one is saying to force upon your kids anything besides going to practice when you say you want to join a team or club.

Just make sure you sit down with him to explain why hes doing things. Kids normally will think training is boring but it can be fun so thats ur job to keep it fun.




When I have kids I want to introduce them to many things but of course I will introduce them to hockey first. Also I want them involved in gymnastics. I think athletics is very important and to learn those natural movements is vital as he grows older and older.


I read on a yahoo page once that a dad was asking how much is a normal amount to allow his kids to play hockey a week. He was scared that it would be bad because of what he saw with certain parents being absurd and having them in so many camps and programs. I mean you can clearly see many crazy dads out there and I understand his fear but its also nonsense.

There are many kids who naturally play hockey all day for hours at end. They love it and want to keep getting better. Its up to you to let him be free, and guide him. You can critique but know that yelling at someone for a poor athletic performance gets you no where

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03-17-2014, 04:19 PM
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My son has need doing private lessons for goalie since he was 7, he is 10 now. He goes for a half hour lesson once a week and does a goalie specific week long camp each summer. The instructors push him just enough to keep him improving each lesson.

My advise is to research where you are going and see if you can do a free lesson or observe other lessons.

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03-17-2014, 11:05 PM
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The kid is my nephew actually

But i agree with keeping it fun. I see some parents and I shake my head. There was power skating going on and one kid was not exactly going out 100% and the dad of that kid looked very angry and said "SKAAAATE!!!".

I was thinking "geez man this is suppose to be for fun". I understand the parents pay good money for powerskating but the did looked scared to make his dad mad and kept skating harder after that. Like man I want to see my nephew make it pro but in all honesty if he doesn't I could care less. As long as he has fun with it.

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03-18-2014, 06:00 AM
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Canadiens1958
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Integrating a Team

One of the key elements in playing hockey as a youngster is learning how to integrate a team, especially an elite team. Finding, defining and playing within the appropriate niche in a team concept.

Outside instruction especially in season has conflict potential since it is individual centered, not team centered. Youngsters will get confused by mixed signals between team and individual coaching.

Off season, individual or camp instruction has merit since it is a building experience independent of team. A gap where learning takes place that will allow for alternative approaches that bridge the gap between the past and upcoming seasons.

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03-18-2014, 08:52 AM
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redbranch
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when my son does private lessons (just turned 9), it's always fundamentals. skating stride, edge work, basic stick work, shot technique, good passing, etc.


I've never really had any issues where it conflicted with his team in any way. If anything, most coaches seem to appreciate it, as they often don't have time to go in detail with individual kids. If the coach tells me he wants my son to improve on something, that's what gets worked on in his private lesson

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03-18-2014, 09:33 AM
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Twrekx
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I have to agree with Redbranch. With my son being a goalie he doesn't get very much coaching, usually the coaches just shoot at him or ask my son what they should do. This year was different as one of the coaches plays goalie so he worked exclusively with my son.

As stated previously I see no issue with kids doing lessons to improve their skills as it has no bearing on their team play. It is the experience of playing with their team mates and battling for those goals that builds the team, so I don't see where any "mixed signals" would come from with taking skills camps or lessons. As a coach and hockey parent I see the "mixed signals" caused by the parents.

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03-18-2014, 11:06 AM
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Canadiens1958
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Skaters

Quote:
Originally Posted by Twrekx View Post
I have to agree with Redbranch. With my son being a goalie he doesn't get very much coaching, usually the coaches just shoot at him or ask my son what they should do. This year was different as one of the coaches plays goalie so he worked exclusively with my son.

As stated previously I see no issue with kids doing lessons to improve their skills as it has no bearing on their team play. It is the experience of playing with their team mates and battling for those goals that builds the team, so I don't see where any "mixed signals" would come from with taking skills camps or lessons. As a coach and hockey parent I see the "mixed signals" caused by the parents.
Skaters - basics include body positioning for certain situations. You rarely find agreement amongst coaches/instructors about this aspect at the best of times. Likewise the use of angles, arcs, straight lines in various game situations. Again very few coaches/instructors agree at the best of times re game situations. Various legit approaches given teammates skills and team approaches.

So the youngster receives mixed signals since the instructor may not be privy to these factors.

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03-18-2014, 12:03 PM
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redbranch
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we haven't encountered anything like that. It may be partly because of the age level, but also partly because the private lessons are at the same place, so the coaching is fairly consistent.

You're also going to get what you mention from going from fall to spring, from season to season. My son's alert enough if the instructor is telling him something radically different, or contrary, to say, "hey, my coach wants us doing it this way"

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03-20-2014, 06:33 PM
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He tried the skating tredmill which was like $45 for 30 mins. Was really tired by the time it was over lol. But I like the machine because it helps with the kids stride

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