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Sponsorship for Beer league team

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03-27-2014, 01:14 PM
  #1
mistrhanky
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Sponsorship for Beer league team

Anyone done this? My team already has jersey's and we don't want to have to buy new jerseys or logo's. However, we could potentially add a sponsor to our name without changing logo's, we have some extra sub jersey's we could frame if a sponsor wants to hang one up, and we could add patches to our uni's.

Has anyone gone about doing this? How did you drum up your sponsor? Any particularly good businesses to target? Looking for ways to cut our costs a bit.

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03-27-2014, 01:18 PM
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Chau Vo
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In order for a business to sponsor you you have to show them how it would benefit them. Are you guys going to go out to the bar afterward and rack up bills averaging to $40 a person? Do you have fans who will visit their establishment after games?

If all else fails, contact Mr. Ducksworth and convince him it will be a good PR campaign for his firm.

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03-27-2014, 01:33 PM
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mistrhanky
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Heh... yeah, that is the problem, right? When you play games at 11:00 at night in front of three fans, hard to show how that helps them.

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03-27-2014, 02:01 PM
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What I always like to do is count up the exposure ("impressions" in marketing terms) of their brand during the season. So, for example, if you're in a 6 team league and every team has 15 players, that's 90 players who are being exposed to their brand. If you then play a 10 game season, it's akin to 900 "impressions," not including fans, officials, and others who see your standings, etc. Then emphasize how often your guys will go out after the games and how pretty much all the guys drink after games/skates.

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03-27-2014, 02:08 PM
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The thing is, with social media and everyone being connected the way we are, its far more feasible nowadays to get the word out that someone is being a good person and helping out a team than its ever been in the past.

It can go beyond slapping something on a jersey, or naming your team after your sponsor(which I feel both still should be done anyhow if someone is giving you their money so you can subsidize the cost for your team)

Something like Facebook recognition can be huge. Its advertisement for them, in terms of getting their company name out there, and that they are willing to help out, as well as the good will it brings in from people knowing what type of person/company they are.

The downside is- the current state of the economy isn't going to allow for a lot of extra money to be thrown at a beer league team in most cases.
Also, beer league guys are grown men(even though some don't act like it). They can pay their way. Let any sponsorship money make its way to youth hockey and whatnot. The latter just being my personal feeling.

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03-27-2014, 03:18 PM
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Canadiens1958
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League Sponsor

Consider a league sponsor including things like board and venue advertising at the arena(s).


Locally, Coors,Molson sponsor leagues as do pharmacy, food chains and other entities.

Good luck.

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03-28-2014, 11:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MattGTI View Post
Also, beer league guys are grown men(even though some don't act like it). They can pay their way. Let any sponsorship money make its way to youth hockey and whatnot. The latter just being my personal feeling.
I have a job where the expense of hockey is a non-issue but for some on my team cost may be an issue and we are working to get a sponsor.

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03-28-2014, 12:04 PM
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Originally Posted by jazzykat View Post
I have a job where the expense of hockey is a non-issue but for some on my team cost may be an issue and we are working to get a sponsor.
And thats fine. I see no issues with that. Its just my opinion that what little left over money can be donated for any type of sponsorship nowadays should go to the kids, and youth hockey.

I play softball on a league and tourney team that is fully sponsored. So I see both sides. Although it is by a bar/grill, and we drop a lot of money there both in season and out of season.

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03-28-2014, 12:31 PM
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Chau Vo
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Originally Posted by MattGTI View Post
And thats fine. I see no issues with that. Its just my opinion that what little left over money can be donated for any type of sponsorship nowadays should go to the kids, and youth hockey.

I play softball on a league and tourney team that is fully sponsored. So I see both sides. Although it is by a bar/grill, and we drop a lot of money there both in season and out of season.
Yeah, in the end, it's all about exposure and/or community goodwill. Sponsoring grown adults wholly capable of getting jobs or working should be last on the list unless those adults put a ton of money into your business themselves.

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03-28-2014, 02:26 PM
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Share of the Pie

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Originally Posted by Chau Vo View Post
Yeah, in the end, it's all about exposure and/or community goodwill. Sponsoring grown adults wholly capable of getting jobs or working should be last on the list unless those adults put a ton of money into your business themselves.
There are synergies between adult and youth hockey.

Namely the ability of the arena to rent ice when the kids are in school or when adults have other responsibilities reduces costs for both.

Also youth hockey selling board and arena advertising benefits from the added adult hockey presence in the arena by offering sponsors extra eyeballs and key demographics. Also in the case of public arenas, the adults are the ones who pay taxes so they have a claim to benefits and relief.

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03-28-2014, 02:47 PM
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Originally Posted by Chau Vo View Post
If all else fails, contact Mr. Ducksworth and convince him it will be a good PR campaign for his firm.
And if Mr. Ducksworth goes south on you, make sure to remind him that he may have paid for that jersey, but he didn't earn it.

The best bet is to simply find a really rich captain who doesn't mind just dropping the entire team fee himself. I heard of a few of those.

My friend plays softball and for a few years, his team was the Boulder Valley Democrats. They were fully sponsored by Jared Polis, who's now the U.S. Representative for the area. He'd show up to play on rare occasion. So, write to your congressman!

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03-28-2014, 03:26 PM
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Originally Posted by Canadiens1958 View Post
There are synergies between adult and youth hockey.

Namely the ability of the arena to rent ice when the kids are in school or when adults have other responsibilities reduces costs for both.

Also youth hockey selling board and arena advertising benefits from the added adult hockey presence in the arena by offering sponsors extra eyeballs and key demographics. Also in the case of public arenas, the adults are the ones who pay taxes so they have a claim to benefits and relief.
I understand and agree with what your saying in theory. However, I disagree with it in the real world.

When a rink rents ice(say its 225.00 an hour, just for an example). Subtracting the minimal cost of running the Zamboni over the ice 1x, a marginal cost of lighting, and the bigger cost the refridgeration- the rink owner isn't putting that back into lowering the cost for the teams that play there. At least not anything that is viable. He's putting most of it back into long term reinvestment in the rink, paying his employees, and the rest is going into his bank account.

Also in a community of 10, 20, 75, 100 thousand taxpayers. Everyone understands just how much of thier "tax dollars" are going back into the public rink? Correct?
Next to nothing. So while that claim can be made, because its technically true. Its another instance of it not being enough to be close to viable.

Men's hockey(beer league) is a tough thing in this instance. Not many people go to the games. They are at non ideal times. It would be hard for me as a business owner to want throw any money at towards that. Where as I can sponsor a kids team. A ton of parents and relatives go to the game. The times are usually slightly better. Not too mention the good will it could bring that someone is helping kids play a sport.

As I said, I see both sides, and have been on both sides.

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03-28-2014, 04:09 PM
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There's no legitimate sponsorship at social level, only donations or charity, because there's little or no tangible return or benefit to potential sponsors, unless it's a pub or bar that a team might frequent.

Invariably where teams are sponsored they are sponsored by someone on the team or their business or by a close associate who doesn't really expect anything in return.

My BIL owns a couple of bars/restaurants, but I'd never approach him, because they're not near any rinks and there'd be no return for him.

I'd consider sponsoring my own team if necessary, because while it's not the NHL, it is a team and guys shouldn't be skating around looking like they just jumped off a refugee ship.

The solution is within the team or close associates. They can 'own' a sports team; and who wouldn't want to own a team?

Sell season tickets to family and friends, etc. presuming there's no actual charge to come and watch?

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03-28-2014, 05:02 PM
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Real World

Quote:
Originally Posted by MattGTI View Post
I understand and agree with what your saying in theory. However, I disagree with it in the real world.

When a rink rents ice(say its 225.00 an hour, just for an example). Subtracting the minimal cost of running the Zamboni over the ice 1x, a marginal cost of lighting, and the bigger cost the refridgeration- the rink owner isn't putting that back into lowering the cost for the teams that play there. At least not anything that is viable. He's putting most of it back into long term reinvestment in the rink, paying his employees, and the rest is going into his bank account.

Also in a community of 10, 20, 75, 100 thousand taxpayers. Everyone understands just how much of thier "tax dollars" are going back into the public rink? Correct?
Next to nothing. So while that claim can be made, because its technically true. Its another instance of it not being enough to be close to viable.

Men's hockey(beer league) is a tough thing in this instance. Not many people go to the games. They are at non ideal times. It would be hard for me as a business owner to want throw any money at towards that. Where as I can sponsor a kids team. A ton of parents and relatives go to the game. The times are usually slightly better. Not too mention the good will it could bring that someone is helping kids play a sport.

As I said, I see both sides, and have been on both sides.
Ah yes, the real world, like here in a small 30,000 population community where youth and adult hocky use a municipal arena.

Last season the rink arena actually negotiated "pouring rights". Cost of ice rental is approximately $125.00/hr, transient rate with various subsidies and contra agreements this isreduced even more for participating organization. Upwards of ten sponsored adult leagues use the arena, plus an activive youth program and an elite AAA program. All have sponsors(brewers, phamacy chains, grocery chains, restaurant chains, unions, etc.) which reduce costs while allowing for coverage in the two weekly papers serving the area, promotional campaigns for tournaments and activities.

The annual adult Family Tournament draws from across the province played over an extended weekend during prime hours.

The impact in terms of dollars (in and out) to taxpayers has been studiedat various times and is such that the various levels of government are looking at addind an extra pad to the arena as part of an expansion and urban development of recreational facilities that attract business and families.

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03-28-2014, 06:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mistrhanky View Post
Anyone done this? My team already has jersey's and we don't want to have to buy new jerseys or logo's. However, we could potentially add a sponsor to our name without changing logo's, we have some extra sub jersey's we could frame if a sponsor wants to hang one up, and we could add patches to our uni's.

Has anyone gone about doing this? How did you drum up your sponsor? Any particularly good businesses to target? Looking for ways to cut our costs a bit.
I've gotten a few sponsors lined up for teams in our hockey league. Our league has always had a pretty strong tradition of corporate sponsorship, so maybe it's easier here than most, but a few tips;

1) Seek out sponsors looking to make an impact in the community. One sponsor we acquired was a new resource company that had just come to town and was looking to get their name out in the press. We did this in a few ways; first, the jerseys were produced locally by a manufacturer in town. (stimulating local business = good for their image). Secondly, we got the local papers (in our small town, these get a lot of circulation) to do a photo-op and a story on it. So there was some exposure for that. Thirdly, we discussed the fact that 100+ players play in our league, plus around 15 officials, and those players and officials have family/friends that they will talk to and spread word of mouth about this company helping out, etc.

2) One-time cost, potential long-term benefits. Say the cost of a team set of jerseys is $1500; they pay that once. (onus is on the team to look after them so they don't need replacing, though). Their name being out there in the community as mentioned above will go beyond that.

3) If it's a service-based sponsor (for example, I recently secured a restaurant sponsor for a team in our league), pledge that your team will frequent their place of business. In our case, after games finish, our team heads over there for food and drinks. More customers, more business, more income.

Also - if your league gets any sort of coverage on websites, papers, radio, or anything like that, be sure to point that out to your sponsor. Any sort of coverage they can get will be a benefit to them.

Hope some of this is helpful!

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03-29-2014, 08:19 PM
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Ah yes, the real world, like here in a small 30,000 population community where youth and adult hocky use a municipal arena.

Last season the rink arena actually negotiated "pouring rights". Cost of ice rental is approximately $125.00/hr, transient rate with various subsidies and contra agreements this isreduced even more for participating organization. Upwards of ten sponsored adult leagues use the arena, plus an activive youth program and an elite AAA program. All have sponsors(brewers, phamacy chains, grocery chains, restaurant chains, unions, etc.) which reduce costs while allowing for coverage in the two weekly papers serving the area, promotional campaigns for tournaments and activities.

The annual adult Family Tournament draws from across the province played over an extended weekend during prime hours.

The impact in terms of dollars (in and out) to taxpayers has been studiedat various times and is such that the various levels of government are looking at addind an extra pad to the arena as part of an expansion and urban development of recreational facilities that attract business and families.
That's awesome. I wish we had something even remotely close to that here. We have a very strong hockey demographic here in Massachusetts. Its right up there in terms of any other U.S. state, not named Minnesota. However, nothing even remotely close to that level.
Still though, its such a small amount of your tax dollars that are going back into the rink or even building the new surface, that its not tangible(which was my only point). What is tangible is the fact that your town/city/municipality is making enough money off the first rink to warrant a second. That's the bottom line. Its a money maker. If it wasn't, it would cease to exist. Like so many state run rinks here in MA. The private rinks have taken over.

Which leads to my original point- kids need the donations/sponsorships more than some beer league team, and will probably get them more easily and frequently as well. I am not knocking any team that would get a sponsorship. I am not saying tax payers money doesn't go back into state run rinks run at all, so adults should be the beneficiaries of that because they pay taxes.
I am just saying, when push comes to shove- the kids need the help more than a group of adults. That's it. If someone can grab a sponsor to help with jerseys's and league fee's more power to them. That's great.

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03-29-2014, 08:44 PM
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Arenas

^^^The it's not a significant amount view is what lets politician get away with waste and other abuses. Also there is a major difference between municipal arenas and state/province operated arenas. Municipalities have a vested interest in making an arena work. States and provinces do not.

Arenas in most communities should be viewed as multi-purpose facilities.Hockey only is not enough to make many arenas viable. Other activities from concerts to graduation exercises to transient events help make the arena viable for youth and adult hockey.

Another key element is that both the youth and adult hockey groups have to recognize their potential as a political bloc.Not only the players and immediate family but the extended ripple effect.

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03-30-2014, 12:02 AM
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You are putting too much emphasis on the "it's not a significant amount". If you have 30,000 people paying taxes in a municipality, what % of each taxpayers taxes are actual going to that rink over the 10's of 100's of 1000's of other things tax money goes to each year?
It's next to nothing, in comparison to a lot of other things.

The bottom line is it's not the tax payers money keeping it open, it's all the sponsorship and community putting back into it(which is awesome). Even at 125.00 an hour for ice time it's still turning a large enough profit to make it economically viable.

That's the bottom line city, state, municipality- it's not going to stay open if it's operating at a loss. The tax payers money isn't a very large percentage of what's keeping it open.

That being said, I wish more local stores, businesses, etc put back into the community like that. Things are a lot different than when I played little league 30 years ago. All the local sponsorships are gone.

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03-30-2014, 07:45 AM
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Taxes

Quote:
Originally Posted by MattGTI View Post
You are putting too much emphasis on the "it's not a significant amount". If you have 30,000 people paying taxes in a municipality, what % of each taxpayers taxes are actual going to that rink over the 10's of 100's of 1000's of other things tax money goes to each year?
It's next to nothing, in comparison to a lot of other things.


The bottom line is it's not the tax payers money keeping it open, it's all the sponsorship and community putting back into it(which is awesome). Even at 125.00 an hour for ice time it's still turning a large enough profit to make it economically viable.

That's the bottom line city, state, municipality- it's not going to stay open if it's operating at a loss. The tax payers money isn't a very large percentage of what's keeping it open.

That being said, I wish more local stores, businesses, etc put back into the community like that. Things are a lot different than when I played little league 30 years ago. All the local sponsorships are gone.
A few points.

Out of a 30,000 population, very few actually pay municipal taxes - property owners and businesses. Tenants, youngsters, etc do not. Municiple revenues come from a variety of sources, mainly the apportioned trickle down from federal,state/provincial, regional taxes, permits, various fees - parking,etc.

The use of these monies is subject to strict controls and audits. Dipping into the monies designated for the maintenance of state/provincial roads to offset arena costs does not work well.

Key point is that a municipal arena will get every opportunity to survive since self-interest kicks in and a strong portion of the municipal population has a vested interest in making it work. State or provincially run arenas have virtually no chance at survival during hard times since
it is easy for the politicians to sacrifice one for perceived political benefits across the state or province.

Back to sponsorship.

Whether youth or adult hockey, there has to be an understanding of the synergies involved between the groups, the arena and the community. Also getting sponsors is relatively easy to sustaining sponsors.

Key element is the local media, usually the weekly newspaper and the cable channel. Youth and adult hockey benefit from the exposure. New participants are drawn to the activity while existing participants are featured in stories and reports.

Sponsors have to be included in this relationship. Like local politicians of all stripes, sponsors love publicity. Invite one and all to press conferences, mention one and all in press releases, on websites, etc.
Grocery store or mall is a sponsor hold or rotate registration weekends amongst the locations instead of the arena. Hold the car wash fundraiser at a sponsors garage, etc. Invite one and all to awards or end of season dinners, give them freebies to events charging admission, etc. Arrange to distribute their flyers at events at the arena, patronize their businesses and events etc.

The next step is clearly defined sponsorship objectives. Clear understanding about the dollars required, the value of the exposure you offer and your ability/willingness to work at sustaining the sponsorship arrangement.

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