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best blade curve for elevating wrist shots (beginner)

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Old
04-08-2014, 08:24 AM
  #26
AntsSheffield
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AIREAYE View Post
That curve is by no means relatively flat...
I stand corrected. I thought the Sakic curve was a pretty neutral kind of setup

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04-08-2014, 08:31 AM
  #27
thevil
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AntsSheffield View Post
I stand corrected. I thought the Sakic curve was a pretty neutral kind of setup
If you want a pretty flat blade, CCM has the Couturier:


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04-08-2014, 09:33 AM
  #28
AIREAYE
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CCM no longer offers the Couturier on any of their sticks.

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04-08-2014, 02:17 PM
  #29
domm17
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thanks for everyone who shared their opinions, i appreciate it.
also just as a quick update, i went out the other day and worked a lot on technique. i was using my buddies stick which had a nugent-hopkins blade p91. after a few minutes, i was able to elevate 95% of my shots. so i realize a lot of my problems were some crucial technique errors that i now have fixed.

that being said, i still want a blade that will optimize my wrist shot and elevation on the shot, so i appreciate all the help. im gonna read back over the posts and decide on a blade to start out with. unfortunately i dont have a store where i can try out blades and sticks, so i have to just buy one hope for the best.

looks like a lot of recommendations for the p88 and p92. i was originally looking at the p88, but someone said that was hard to learn on. any more thoughts on that? guess everyone is different. also, does anyone have any experience using the hossa p40, p106, or p91a. i was looking at those, and the p106 actually looked like it would fit me well, but i dont see many reviews or anything about it, anyone ever use it?

also which curve type would be easiest to use for shooting wrist shots as a beginner: heel, mid or toe?

again, any opinions and guidance will be greatly appreciated.

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04-08-2014, 03:19 PM
  #30
Jarick
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Here's some GENERAL classifications of curves:

P88 - Moderate mid curve, face opens slightly from mid to toe.
PM9/E4 - Small mid-heel curve, face stays closed.
P92/E3 - Big mid curve, face opens wide from mid to toe.
P91/E6 - Moderate heel curve, face opens wide from heel to tie.
P02/E5 - Big mid-heel curve, face opens wide from mid-heel to toe
E7 - Small mid curve, face stays closed.
P14 - Cross between P88 and P92, generally.
E28 - Similar to P92 but with a toe curve instead of mid.

I would highly recommend, again, learning on a P88. Some people recommend the PM9 for beginners, but I think it's a little easier to shoot on a P88 and I like how it's a bit easier to protect the puck with the curve pocket.

Now obviously if you can play hockey well, you're going to be just fine with any of them. Give Crosby a backwards stick with any of those curves and he'll probably school 99.9% of hockey players in the world with it.

But I just generally think a good all-around curve is a good thing to start with.

The P91 for sure will get pucks up in a hurry, but I found it hard to keep passes low. The P88 and P14 were the best for me in terms of passing the puck.

My shot is the best with the E28 since the puck can go high or low, left or right predictably for me. It just kind of works. The P92 and P91 get up in a hurry with a lot of velocity, but are harder to control and I miss the net. PM9 doesn't work for me as I tend to flub on shots as I'm used to a more open face.

Nothing touches the PM9 for backhands, but 95% of the time I'm shooting on my forehand and the backhand passes are good enough with the rest of the lot.

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04-08-2014, 03:39 PM
  #31
The Tikkanen
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I went from Coffey to Gaborik to CCM Landeskog, all were great for easy elevation of the puck in tight spaces.

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04-08-2014, 06:27 PM
  #32
Onetimersniper28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thevil View Post
To be fair, it was never intended to be a curve for taking blueline slappers. It is made for forwards.
I'm a forward, but I want to be able to let it rip from anywhere in the offensive zone. I found myself taking shots from the blue line a few times this year, whether it was on the rush or on the powerplay, when I switch spots with the defender.

I'm more of a long distance shooter, as I don't drive to the net often.

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04-08-2014, 06:30 PM
  #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jarick View Post
Here's some GENERAL classifications of curves:

P88 - Moderate mid curve, face opens slightly from mid to toe.
PM9/E4 - Small mid-heel curve, face stays closed.
P92/E3 - Big mid curve, face opens wide from mid to toe.
P91/E6 - Moderate heel curve, face opens wide from heel to tie.
P02/E5 - Big mid-heel curve, face opens wide from mid-heel to toe
E7 - Small mid curve, face stays closed.
P14 - Cross between P88 and P92, generally.
E28 - Similar to P92 but with a toe curve instead of mid.

I would highly recommend, again, learning on a P88. Some people recommend the PM9 for beginners, but I think it's a little easier to shoot on a P88 and I like how it's a bit easier to protect the puck with the curve pocket.

Now obviously if you can play hockey well, you're going to be just fine with any of them. Give Crosby a backwards stick with any of those curves and he'll probably school 99.9% of hockey players in the world with it.

But I just generally think a good all-around curve is a good thing to start with.

The P91 for sure will get pucks up in a hurry, but I found it hard to keep passes low. The P88 and P14 were the best for me in terms of passing the puck.

My shot is the best with the E28 since the puck can go high or low, left or right predictably for me. It just kind of works. The P92 and P91 get up in a hurry with a lot of velocity, but are harder to control and I miss the net. PM9 doesn't work for me as I tend to flub on shots as I'm used to a more open face.

Nothing touches the PM9 for backhands, but 95% of the time I'm shooting on my forehand and the backhand passes are good enough with the rest of the lot.
Agreed with everything, but there's a little detail you forgot. The E28 is significantly deeper than the P92, and the other curves as well. Only the P08 is deeper.

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04-08-2014, 06:39 PM
  #34
Man Bear Pig
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I've messed around with just about every kind of blade out there and in my 20+ years of playing hockey and I always end up with basically the same curve, that being the Zetterberg. It's as close to straight as there is. I can elevate the puck with ease from any distance. Curves are completely a personal preference. I picked up a Backstrom recently, went out on the ice and gave up on it after 15 minutes(I wanted to try something different). What works for some won't work for all. Go to a pro hockey life or a similar store and try some out. It's all about your release.

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Old
04-09-2014, 05:59 AM
  #35
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You should probably learn how to take a proper wrist-shot so that you can elevate the puck easily using any curve.

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04-09-2014, 08:32 AM
  #36
Geo73
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I've still got a big stash of Lidstrom curves that I love. Great for elevating pucks.

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04-09-2014, 08:37 AM
  #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Onetimersniper28 View Post
I wouldn't suggest these kind of curves for beginners. Remember that he needs to nail down the proper shooting technique first. Using the Crazy Ovi as a noob will have him skying shots at first. When he gets used to it, he won't be able to use anything else.
I agree with this.

Focus on being able to shoot the puck properly, not the curve of the stick.

The curve enhances skills. It cant do that if there are no skills.

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