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Wrist /snap shot difference

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Old
04-20-2014, 04:31 PM
  #1
dlam
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Wrist /snap shot difference

What's the difference ?
I have always been a wrist shot guy cause I can get the puck off really fast if I'm checked
However sometime it's a soft shot

I have been trying to develop a snap shot. As its is a harder shot and it's a quick release
The problem seems to that I like to release by pushing off my off foot like the wrist shot but it doesn't work well
It seems my snap shot works well if I think of it as a mini slap shot and balance off my other leg

Any one else have any helpful tips for snap shot release?

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Old
04-20-2014, 06:10 PM
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A true wrister will give you better accuracy, but now the snapshot is definitely more widely used because the release is a lot faster and with one pieces today you can get a shot off just as hard.

It is like a mini slapshot in the sense that you want to get a good flexing of the stick which is achieved by pushing down on the ice. There are many ways to go about this, depending on your curve and what situation youre in.

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04-21-2014, 03:37 AM
  #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dlam View Post
What's the difference ?
I have always been a wrist shot guy cause I can get the puck off really fast if I'm checked
However sometime it's a soft shot

I have been trying to develop a snap shot. As its is a harder shot and it's a quick release
The problem seems to that I like to release by pushing off my off foot like the wrist shot but it doesn't work well
It seems my snap shot works well if I think of it as a mini slap shot and balance off my other leg

Any one else have any helpful tips for snap shot release?
The wrist-shot is the one that is supposed to be taken while transferring your weight to your "right" foot (as in the one not on your shooting side). The snap-shot SHOULD be taken while transferring your weight to the leg on your shooting side so that you can shoot in-stride. It seems like you have it mixed up.

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Old
04-21-2014, 09:12 AM
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dlam
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Originally Posted by Fanned On It View Post
The wrist-shot is the one that is supposed to be taken while transferring your weight to your "right" foot (as in the one not on your shooting side). The snap-shot SHOULD be taken while transferring your weight to the leg on your shooting side so that you can shoot in-stride. It seems like you have it mixed up.
Not sure what you mean by that.
I say "off foot" I mean when Im playing off wing it's easier to wrist shot and balance of my left foot ( I shoot left.)
When I on my left wing side of the rink and in stride I find I can snap it easier .
When Im not handling the puck , and get a quick past pass to my wing I can snap it easier as well as opposed to stickhandling and floating to the center or too my off wing.

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04-21-2014, 10:53 AM
  #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dlam View Post
What's the difference ?
I have always been a wrist shot guy cause I can get the puck off really fast if I'm checked
However sometime it's a soft shot

I have been trying to develop a snap shot. As its is a harder shot and it's a quick release
The problem seems to that I like to release by pushing off my off foot like the wrist shot but it doesn't work well
It seems my snap shot works well if I think of it as a mini slap shot and balance off my other leg

Any one else have any helpful tips for snap shot release?
A wrist shot usually starts with the puck behind you and a full weight transfer. A snap shot starts with the puck in front and it's a quicker release. I'm a right handed shot, so I would finish a wrist shot with my body weight over my left leg, while a snap shot would start and finish on my right leg. You get less weight behind it, but you can shoot much quicker this way.

One tip that really helped me with my snap shot is to keep your inside arm (in my case my right arm) straight so that you get the full force of your body behind the puck. This will give your stick some flex.

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Old
04-22-2014, 02:16 AM
  #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dlam View Post
Not sure what you mean by that.
I say "off foot" I mean when Im playing off wing it's easier to wrist shot and balance of my left foot ( I shoot left.)
When I on my left wing side of the rink and in stride I find I can snap it easier .
When Im not handling the puck , and get a quick past pass to my wing I can snap it easier as well as opposed to stickhandling and floating to the center or too my off wing.
I mean when you take a "wrist-shot" you should be finishing with your weight over your leg that ISN'T on your shooting side (your right leg). That's a proper "wrist-shot". A snap-shot would have you shooting with your weight over your shooting-side leg (your left leg). Seems like you have the two mixed up.

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Old
04-22-2014, 09:02 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dlam View Post
What's the difference ?
I have always been a wrist shot guy cause I can get the puck off really fast if I'm checked
However sometime it's a soft shot

I have been trying to develop a snap shot. As its is a harder shot and it's a quick release
The problem seems to that I like to release by pushing off my off foot like the wrist shot but it doesn't work well
It seems my snap shot works well if I think of it as a mini slap shot and balance off my other leg

Any one else have any helpful tips for snap shot release?
I can see you're a bit confused, and you're mixing up some things. Here's the difference for me :

-Wrist shot :
Pros : Most accurate shot, more power than a snap shot but less than a slap shot
Cons : Longer release than a snap shot

-Snap shot :
Pros : Quickest release, no setup required
Cons : Less power and accuracy than a wrist shot

Basically, it sounds to me as if you're mainly taking snap shots. It's a good thing, because it's the most useful shot in actual game situations as a forward.
You need to be able to shoot off both legs with the wrist shot AND the snapshot.
If I'm shooting while skating, I tend to shoot off my wrong foot (right foot since I'm right handed).
At a standstill position, I release my shot off the correct foot.

Here's a great video to illustrate what I just said :

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Old
04-24-2014, 02:12 PM
  #8
dlam
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Okay thanks, I think what I shot and call as a " wrist shot" is what you guys refer as "snap shot"
I went to my local store and got some more flexable shafts 60-70 and was really able to whip those "wrist snap" without big set up. the hockey stick just acts like a sling shot.

i think what was happening was I have these extra stiff hockey sticks from the wood era and it just was not working well.
I tried a few out and like 75-80 flex, gives me some whip for wrist/snap shot but still stiff enough I can feel slap shot.

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Old
05-10-2014, 08:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dlam View Post
What's the difference ?
I have always been a wrist shot guy cause I can get the puck off really fast if I'm checked
However sometime it's a soft shot

I have been trying to develop a snap shot. As its is a harder shot and it's a quick release
The problem seems to that I like to release by pushing off my off foot like the wrist shot but it doesn't work well
It seems my snap shot works well if I think of it as a mini slap shot and balance off my other leg

Any one else have any helpful tips for snap shot release?
Pretty easy to answer: Wrist shot communicates to the goalie you are getting ready to shoot. You might as well yell to him/her to get ready for the shot!

The Snap shot on the other hand, is one of the best shots ever because it produces minimal body language or communication for the goalie to read!

But a successful snap shot should be done when you are about 2 meters (6ft) away from the goalie. Why?

Because of the closure rate speed and reaction time as you come into the shooting area. Here's a cool drill to do. However, it takes two people.

First place your hand out like you are going to shake hands. Then place your thumb out to make the letter "C". (The "C" represents the goalie) Then the other person holding the puck between your thumb and fingers. Make sure that the thumb is located at the center of the puck. ( the puck holder represents the shooter)

Then when the puck holder is ready, he lets go of the puck and the other player tries to catch the puck before it passes the fingers and hits the ground. 9 times out of 10, the player can NOT catch the puck. This is due to reaction time!

Then have the players hand separate his fingers and try again. There is a better chance that they player's bottom finger will deflect the puck in a different direction. This shows closure rate. Another good example of closure rate, is to hold the puck about 2 puck lengths above the players fingers. Then let go of the puck. There's a really good chance that the player will catch the puck. This also show distance and closure rate to the goalie (the fingers)

Okay so WTF does this all mean. It has every thing to do with closure rate of the player and reaction time of the goalie.

But a good goalie can read and react to body language. In fact, that's one of his best tools he can have, is to read and react to the approaching play. A good goalie can make you think areas are open due to his angle coverage where one minute you feel you have the whole net to shoot at and the next second upon release...you have nothing!

More goals are score with a snap shot because of less communication to the goalie and if you release the shot about 2 meter (6ft) from the goalie, the reaction time will be too fast for him to move fast enough for him to stop it.

Key: Make sure that you release that shot in the same direction of your stick blade. If you are approaching the goalie and you shot right, shoot it on the right side as you face him. Don't shoot across his body to the left side, because the angle of the shot will NOT allow you to pick that left side due to the closure distance!

Hope this help!
Headcoach

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Old
05-11-2014, 09:23 AM
  #10
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My favourite type of snap shot is bringing the puck in a bit with the toe of my stick (somewhat like a toe drag) so it creates a bit of space between the puck and my stick. then I just snap that thing off. Remember to lean your shoulder in

practice makes perfect.. I try to spend around 30 minutes a day to perfect my snap shot

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Old
05-13-2014, 06:14 PM
  #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Headcoach View Post
Key: Make sure that you release that shot in the same direction of your stick blade. If you are approaching the goalie and you shot right, shoot it on the right side as you face him. Don't shoot across his body to the left side, because the angle of the shot will NOT allow you to pick that left side due to the closure distance!
Does shooting across the body to the opposite side (as a righty shoot to our left, goalie's right) simply mean the goalie has more TIME to react and it's a poorer choice?

Because obviously people have picked that left side coming diagonally across (shooter perspective) - also above the right pad and under the blocker is one of the best places to shoot on a goalie.

I personally thought since the goalie is moving to our right with us there is less to shoot at.

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05-13-2014, 07:57 PM
  #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rh71 View Post
Does shooting across the body to the opposite side (as a righty shoot to our left, goalie's right) simply mean the goalie has more TIME to react and it's a poorer choice?

Because obviously people have picked that left side coming diagonally across (shooter perspective) - also above the right pad and under the blocker is one of the best places to shoot on a goalie.

I personally thought since the goalie is moving to our right with us there is less to shoot at.
It's always harder to shoot far side, especially if you're on your on-wing, because you shoot across the body. The puck has to travel a greater distance, and you have a bad angle.
On the off-wing, I like to shoot off the wrong foot, with a quick snapper in the far side corner.
Here's a good example :


The "experts" will say that the goalie let in a soft goal, but it's not the case. As you can see in this video, Burmistrov pulls the puck in towards his body before releasing the shot. This changes the angle of the shot, and since the goalie was sliding towards the left post, he couldn't react in time. Changing the angle on a shot labeled for the far side corner is more effective if you're closer to the goal.
The leg kick looks cool too .

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