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Becoming a scout

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Old
02-20-2007, 01:17 PM
  #26
barrytrotzsneck
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Well, usually they make you mug someone or kill a rival scout, or you can get beat\sexed in.

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02-20-2007, 01:32 PM
  #27
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Originally Posted by nomorekids View Post
Well, usually they make you mug someone or kill a rival scout, or you can get beat\sexed in.
I thought that's how how to become a mod?

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02-20-2007, 09:45 PM
  #28
WheatiesHockey
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Pretty funny Puck Nut. The reality is that most of the junior and college scouts wind up sitting in the same part of the rink getting the same player stats and team lists as each other. They all know each other for that matter. Not really many secrets in ths scouting world since they all see the same players. Scouting is about as scientific as phrenology at times. Think of scouting as intelligent speculation.

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03-07-2007, 01:47 PM
  #29
Kevin Forbes
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Sorry to bump up an old thread, but Brandon Pridham posted a great article on Central Scouting for NHL.com which highlights some of the work involved:

Quote:
The numbers also tell us that the average CS full-time scout traveled to and attended a game in all but six days out of the month and those "off" days were likely the result of travel or due simply to the fact there were no games in the area to be seen that day.
http://www.nhl.com/nhl/app/?service=...NHLPage&id=886

In fact there's a little journal of articles by Pridham discussing the operations of Central Scouting.

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03-07-2007, 02:24 PM
  #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevin Forbes View Post
Sorry to bump up an old thread, but Brandon Pridham posted a great article on Central Scouting for NHL.com which highlights some of the work involved:

http://www.nhl.com/nhl/app/?service=...NHLPage&id=886

In fact there's a little journal of articles by Pridham discussing the operations of Central Scouting.

That was a very interesting read, I found this

http://www.ushl.com/news/story.cfm?id=69

and thought it was actully a little better.....using an idea in this thread, if someone wanted to create their own "checklist" and use the CSB method, and then send in their reports to anyone who will listen, maybe it would hold more water? Since now there is a guide to follow.

Personally, I used to think I'd want that kinda job following around random junior teams and watching the players, now, I don't think I could....seems....way to seperate from watching hockey. That being said I think I could get a real kick outta making up lists and sorting it all out for these CSB guys sadly I enjoy sorting through data, and that seems like fun.

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03-08-2007, 12:53 AM
  #31
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Much of the scouting work would depend on what level of hockey one is scouting for and what age group. At The NHL level much of the scouting tends to be much narrower and players who actually make it to that level might in fact be only extremely good in one small area of the game. For example a fighter might be the bomb at fighting and nothing else. A penalty killing specialist might be a terrific open skater with little hockey sense otherwise, but an awful open ice threat to the other team. Some goalie may be so so but a terrific puck handler and terrific puck handling goalies save years on D Men careers. A very strong team might have only 3 able puck control forwards. The debate could go on and on.
The are a host of imponderables and non quantifiable variables in player assessment. Things like hockey sense, leadership and mental and physical toughness are often framed in the negative. It really shows if the team doesn't have those qualities.
At the junior and collegiate level winning is often a function of how quickly the prospects can grow their game and improve. If a kid played his best ever hockey at the last level issue a caveat.

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03-08-2007, 02:25 AM
  #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevin Forbes View Post
Quote:
The numbers also tell us that the average CS full-time scout traveled to and attended a game in all but six days out of the month and those "off" days were likely the result of travel or due simply to the fact there were no games in the area to be seen that day.
That is literally living out of a suitcase.

Good luck trying to raise a family with this job.

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03-08-2007, 06:57 AM
  #33
Kevin Forbes
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Originally Posted by JerseyMike View Post
That was a very interesting read, I found this

http://www.ushl.com/news/story.cfm?id=69
That's actually part of the NHL.com series, just posted on the USHL's website. On the link I provided, click the dates in the little sidebar that talks about the author and you will find a half dozen or so articles.

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02-07-2011, 05:49 PM
  #34
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Originally Posted by Zine View Post
That is literally living out of a suitcase.

Good luck trying to raise a family with this job.
it's so true.. but sometimes you can get lucky. being a video scout is much more the wave of the future of scouting. You can get many viewings and beable to view more players

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02-07-2011, 05:53 PM
  #35
Kevin Forbes
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Wow this is an old thread!

Anyway, for a counterpoint on video scouting, check out this column by Elliotte Friedman about the situation in Buffalo: http://www.cbc.ca/sports/blogs/ellio...-golisano.html

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02-07-2011, 06:28 PM
  #36
Joey Moss
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I've been looking for this thread for a while now, couldn't find it in search for some reason but i'm glad i've come across it again. Scouting is a dream job of mine as well.

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02-07-2011, 06:41 PM
  #37
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I actually had a conversation with Stu MacGregor, the Edmonton Oilers head scout, about this and he said to just start with a local junior A team/low level college team and work hard. It's inevitable that you'll make your own connections within time. Don't believe people who say that just because you haven't played the game you won't get in, if you have the dedication you will.

Good luck

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02-07-2011, 08:24 PM
  #38
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Originally Posted by Landeskog View Post
it's so true.. but sometimes you can get lucky. being a video scout is much more the wave of the future of scouting. You can get many viewings and beable to view more players
Or at least be able to see players more in detail, since you can see them over and over.

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02-07-2011, 08:42 PM
  #39
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99.9% of the time you are an ex player or well connected to some high level players. My brother in law is an NHL scout. One of his ex teammates was the son of an NHL GM which got his foot in the door. As someone else said, not as glamourous as you think. About the only way you are going to have the slightest of slight chances to get in without said connections is to do a ton of free grunt work. Try looking at major junior clubs and seeing if you can get anything at all with them and earn someone's trust. You're in for a long, long road going that route.

You may also want to check NHL.com as they have jobs listed there.

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02-07-2011, 09:17 PM
  #40
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My 2 cents....

I freelance scouted QMJHL, OHL, WHL, AJHL, BCHL, CIS for about 10 years.
I did it for the love of the game....100% of the costs were mine and they were huge.

What this did give me was connections, and lots of them.

From there I got jobs as follows:

- scout for an NHL affiliate/farm team (still there)
- a player rep. for an NHLPA Certified Agency (agency closed as founder took a mgmt. job in the NHL)
- western regional scout for a major scouting agency (left due to a family illness)
- Director of Player Devlopment for an NHLPA Certified Agency (still there)
note- to avoid conflict I do not work with any players involving the affiliate club

This work requires attending 15-20 games per month, tons of travel, driving, flying, winter road conditions etc.
For the most part scouts are great guys and they network and help each other like you would not believe......sharing rides, motels, scouting info etc.
Most arenas have scouting suites where scouts, media, hockey mgmt...NHL, WHL etc. gather, exchange info , get free coffee, pop, hot dogs, popcorn etc. Depending on the venue you may run across 50 + people in the suite or only a handful.
In addition you have access to the dressing rooms, press box , basically full access to the whole arena. Upstairs in the "attic" of many arenas (basically above the center ice score clock each individual scout has their own personal tv set and ear phones etc.
On the agency side I watch every game my player plays....have the web packages to view and attend as many games live as i can.
Contact with the player varies....based on his need/desire. I client I have wants to talk after every game.....game ends, he shows, meets press, boards the bus and then we talk via phone or text....usually 30-60 minutes. Add a 1 hour time change and this equates to many late nights. (Thankfully this player is a gem....on and off the ice, an absolute pleasure to work with)
Hard, long, work.........my kids are grown and my wife is a saint!
Tonite is an off day for me meaning I am watching the Blackhawks/Flames on TV, farting around on here and working on a media blurb on a client.
I would not trade this for the world but if you think you are getting rich or travelling business class to elite places you are in for a shock.


Last edited by leoleo3535: 02-07-2011 at 10:11 PM.
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Old
02-07-2011, 10:04 PM
  #41
Jamie Benn
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This is the PERFECT job for me.

My life literally revolves around hockey.
I'm only 16, but I know much more then they know and there 3 times my age.

I've always wanted to go to a CHL game, or even work for any CHL team.
But where I live there is no really BIG opportunites, other then the BCHL.

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02-07-2011, 10:09 PM
  #42
leoleo3535
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TourettesGuy View Post
This is the PERFECT job for me.

My life literally revolves around hockey.
I'm only 16, but I know much more then they know and there 3 times my age.

I've always wanted to go to a CHL game, or even work for any CHL team.
But where I live there is no really BIG opportunites, other then the BCHL.
The BCHL is an excellent league..........I spend lots of nights in BCHL & AJHL arenas.
Full of NHL, WHL, NCAA scouts....begin your networking.

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02-07-2011, 10:21 PM
  #43
Jamie Benn
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Originally Posted by leoleo3535 View Post
The BCHL is an excellent league..........I spend lots of nights in BCHL & AJHL arenas.
Full of NHL, WHL, NCAA scouts....begin your networking.
I'd love to, I just have NO idea where to start.

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02-07-2011, 10:25 PM
  #44
leoleo3535
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Originally Posted by TourettesGuy View Post
I'd love to, honestly i'd like to think that it would be a little awkward giving out cards at 16 years old.
Go to the games and compile scouting notes, meet scouts, hockey people.
Do this for a couple of seasons and when you go to introduce yourself and show your scouting info 2-3 yrs from now many people will recognize you as the kid that was working and attending for the last couple of years.

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02-07-2011, 10:36 PM
  #45
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Originally Posted by TourettesGuy View Post
I'd love to, I just have NO idea where to start.
Pick an area and focus on that 1 area.

example, pick one of the following:

- NHL draft eligble kids only
- kids with minor pro upside- ECHL, CHL etc.
- kids with NCAA ambitions/skill sets
- kids with WHL upside / desire

You don't watch the game you watch the 1,2,3,4 players in the game that fit in your category.
Compile scouting info on the players in your focus group. Cross reference them and your reports vs players in the same focus in the other leagues that you are not viewing.
Talk to scouts in attendance....voice your thoughts, ask for their feedback etc.
After you have done this for a few seasons and you are comfortable in what you are doing you can then:
Package your data in a professional format and send it to the heads of your target teams...ie WHL GM's, NHL GM's/Director of Amateur Scouting, NCAA schools-hockey recruitment, ECHL / CHL clubs etc.

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02-07-2011, 11:03 PM
  #46
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Quote:
Originally Posted by leoleo3535 View Post
Pick an area and focus on that 1 area.

example, pick one of the following:

- NHL draft eligble kids only
- kids with minor pro upside- ECHL, CHL etc.
- kids with NCAA ambitions/skill sets
- kids with WHL upside / desire

You don't watch the game you watch the 1,2,3,4 players in the game that fit in your category.
Compile scouting info on the players in your focus group. Cross reference them and your reports vs players in the same focus in the other leagues that you are not viewing.
Talk to scouts in attendance....voice your thoughts, ask for their feedback etc.
After you have done this for a few seasons and you are comfortable in what you are doing you can then:
Package your data in a professional format and send it to the heads of your target teams...ie WHL GM's, NHL GM's/Director of Amateur Scouting, NCAA schools-hockey recruitment, ECHL / CHL clubs etc.
Where would you find the scouts in attendance to talk to? Just out of curiosity. I imagine it depends on the arena.

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02-07-2011, 11:37 PM
  #47
leoleo3535
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Originally Posted by SMoneyMonkey View Post
Where would you find the scouts in attendance to talk to? Just out of curiosity. I imagine it depends on the arena.
All CHL arenas (certainly most) have certain sections where scouts gather. If you ask an usher where the scouts section is they will point it out.
Obviously if you are very young most scouts are not going to want to be bothered as they have a job to do but you certainly can observe what they are doing. If you frequent the arena they will recognize you over time and your window will begin opening.
In AJHL, BCHL arenas etc they usually are scattered throughout the arena and not hard to spot....clipboard, laptop are standard fare.
Many AJHL, BCHL arenas only have 1 or 2 entrances and it is common to have a scout sign in sheet. It is visible to all and you can easily see who is in attendance.

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