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1970s European Wingers

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06-17-2014, 09:04 AM
  #1
Theokritos
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1970s European Wingers

Since the HOH Top 60 Wingers of All-Time project is now under way, it might be useful to gather some information and thoughts about European wingers of the 1970s who are promising candidates for the top 60 and IMHO deserve to not be left off any preliminary list. I'm especially aiming at the ranking of those players relative to each other.

Not included:
-Players who more often played center than LW/RW. Alexander Maltsev, Václav Nedomanský.
-Players who played more in the 1960s than in the 1970s. Anatoli Firsov.
-Players who must primarily be judged by their NHL and/or WHA career. Anders Hedberg.

The players are, in the order I would rank them:
1) Valeri Kharlamov
2) Vladimír Martinec
3) Boris Mikhailov
4) Alexander Yakushev

Other players who IMO deserve a look: Vladimir Vikulov, Viktor Shalimov, Helmuts Balderis and Jiří Holík.
EDIT: Sergei Kapustin too.


Last edited by Theokritos: 06-18-2014 at 03:01 AM.
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06-17-2014, 09:05 AM
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1) Valeri Kharlamov (*Jan 1948), LW

1967 (19 years old):
First game in the senior league for CSKA Moscow.

1968-69 (20/21):
Called up to the national team.
4th in Soviet Player of the Year voting (behind Firsov/F, Zinger/G, Starshinov/F).

1969-70 (21/22):
5th in SPY voting (behind Konovalenko/G, Maltsev/F, Starshinov/F, Vikulov/F).

1970-71 (22/23):
World Championship All-Star team.
Soviet AS team, 4th in SPY voting (behind Tretiak/G, Mikhailov/F, Vasiliev/D, Maltsev/F).

1971-72 (23/24):
WCh AS team. Top scorer at the Olympics by far.
Soviet AS team, 2nd in SPY voting (tied point-wise with winner Maltsev/F).

1972-73 (24/25):
WCh AS team.
Soviet AS team, 1st in SPY voting.

1973-74 (25/26):
Soviet AS team, 5th in SPY voting (behind Tretiak/G, Mikhailov/F, Vasiliev/D, Maltsev/F).

1974-75 (26/27):
Soviet All-Star team, 2nd in SPY voting (behind Tretiak/G).

1975-76 (27/28):
WCh AS team, WCh Best Forward award.
Soviet AS team, 2nd in SPY voting (behind Tretiak/G).

May 1976 (28):
First car accident. Kharlamov suffers a fractured tibia, two broken ribs and a concussion. Resumes playing in November, even though doctors recommend retirement.

1977-78 (29/30):
Soviet AS team.

August 1981 (33):
Second car accident. Kharlamov and his wife fatally injured.

Interesting scoring records:
1972 Summit Series (USSR vs NHL Team Canada): 3 goals + 4 assists = 7 points (in 7 games)
1974 Summit Series (USSR vs WHA Team Canada): 2 goals + 6 assists = 8 points (in 8 games)
1975-76 Super Series (CSKA vs NHL clubs): 4 goals + 3 assists = 7 points (in 4 games)
1979 Challenge Cup (USSR vs NHL All-Star team): 0 goals + 1 assist = 1 point (in 1 game)
1979-80 Super Series (CSKA vs NHL clubs): 2 goals + 1 assist = 3 points (in 5 games)

The case for Kharlamov:
-Perennial All-Star in his prime, clearly the best SPY voting record out of all skaters from 1972-1976: won it once and finished in 2nd place three times (once tied with the winner, two times ahead of everybody not named Tretiak). 1976-1981 sharp decline after the first car crash.
-Widely regarded as the best Soviet player or at least skater of the 1970s, if not of the whole Soviet era.
-Strong international record: Four times World Championship All-Star, outstanding scorer at the 1972 Olympics, honoured as best forward at the 1976 World Championship.
-Impressive against North American pro teams, repeatedly gave NHL calibre opponents all they could handle.


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06-17-2014, 09:06 AM
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2) Vladimír Martinec (*Dec 1949), RW

1967 (17 or 18):
First game in the senior league for Pardubice.

1969-70 (19/20):
Called up to the national team.

1971-72 (21/22):
7th in Czechoslovak Golden Stick voting (4th among forwards).

1972-73 (22/23):
Czechoslovak All-Star team, 1st in CGS voting.

1973-74 (23/24):
World Championship All-Star team.
Czechoslovak AS team, 3rd in CGS voting (behind Holeček/G, Jiří Holík/F).

1974-75 (24/25):
WCh AS team.
Czechoslovak AS team, 1st in CGS voting.

1975-76 (25/26):
WCh AS team.
Czechosovak AS team, 1st in CGS voting.

1976-77 (26/27):
WCh AS team.
Czechoslovak AS team, 4th in CGS voting (behind Nový/F, Hlinka/F, Pospíšil/D).

1977-78 (27/28):
7th in CGS voting (4th among forwards). Voting of Czechoslovak AS teams discontinued.

1978-79 (28/29):
1st in CGS voting.

1979-80 (29/30):
5th in CGS voting (behind Peter Šťastný/F, Nový/F, Králik/G).

1980-81 (30/31):
6th in CGS voting (5th among forwards).

1981 (32):
Allowed to go abroad as a veteran, plays in West Germany -1985.

Interesting scoring records:
1972 CSSR vs NHL Team Canada: zero points (in 1 game) *probably scored 1 goal, but awarded to another player
1974 CSSR vs WHA Team Canada: zero points (in 1 game)
1975 CSSR vs Winnipeg Jets: 1 goal + ?* assists = ? points (in 2 games) *not recorded in my source
1976 Canada Cup: 3 goals + 4 assists = 7 points (in 7 games)
-vs Team Canada: 0 goals + 3 assists = 3 points (in 3 games)
1976 CSSR vs Winnipeg Jets: 1 goal + 0 assists = 1 point (in 1 game)
1977-78 Pardubice vs NHL clubs: 1 goal + 3 assists = 4 points (in 4 games)

The case for Martinec:
-Widely considered one of the best Czech players in history. In 1998 a panel of 50 Czech experts ranked him fourth, only behind Hašek, Jágr and 1940s legend Vladimír Zábrodský.
-Perennial All-Star in his prime, clearly the best CGS voting record of all players from 1973-1979, winning it four times.
-Czechoslovak player the Soviets feared most, one of the go-to guys for the national team when they upset the Soviets to win the World Championship in 1976 and 1977.
-Strong international record: A four times World Championship All-Star, over Boris Mikhailov among others.
-Did well in the 1976 Canada Cup, solid scoring numbers against NHL calibre opponents.


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06-17-2014, 09:06 AM
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3) Boris Mikhailov (*Oct 1944), RW

1965 (20):
First game in the senior league for Lokomotiv Moscow. 1967 transfer to CSKA Moscow.

1968-69 (23/24):
Becomes a regular on the national team.
5th in Soviet Player of the Year voting (behind Firsov/F, Zinger/G, Starshinov/F, Kharlamov/F).

1972-73 (27/28):
World Championship All-Star team.
Soviet All-Star team, 4th in SPY voting (behind Kharlamov/F, Petrov/F, Tretiak/G).

1973-74 (28/29):
Soviet AS team, 2nd in SPY voting (behind Tretiak/G).

1974-75 (29/30):
Soviet AS team, 5th in SPY voting (behind Tretiak/G, Kharlamov/F, Yakushev/F, Petrov/F).

1976-77 (31/32):
Soviet AS team, 3rd in SPY voting (behind Balderis/F, Petrov/F).

1977-78 (32/33):
Soviet AS team, 1st in SPY voting.

1978-79 (33/34):
WCh AS team.
Soviet AS team, 1st in SPY voting.

1979-80 (34/35):
3rd in SPY voting (behind Makarov/F, Krutov/F).

1980-81 (35/36):
Retires at the age of 36.

Interesting scoring records:
1972 Summit Series (USSR vs NHL Team Canada): 3 goals + 2 assists = 5 points (in 8 games)
1974 Summit Series (USSR vs WHA Team Canada): 4 goals + 2 assists = 6 points (in 7 games)
1975-76 Super Series (CSKA vs NHL clubs): 2 goals + 3 assists = 5 points (in 4 games)
1979 Challenge Cup (USSR vs NHL All-Star team): 3 goals + 0 assists = 3 points (in 3 games)
1979-80 Super Series (CSKA vs NHL clubs): 2 goals + 2 assists = 4 points (in 5 games)

The case for Mikhailov:
-Almost perennial All-Star in his (relatively late) prime from 1973-1980, strongest SPY voting record of all players from 1977-1980: 1st twice, 3rd twice.
-Good international record: Two times World Championship All-Star, honoured as best forward at the 1973 World Championship.
-Valuable against North American pro teams, solid scoring numbers against NHL calibre opponents.
-Exceptional longevity for a Soviet player.

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06-17-2014, 09:07 AM
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4) Alexander Yakushev (*Jan 1947), LW

1964 (17):
First game in the senior league for Spartak Moscow.

1966-67 (19/20):
Becomes a regular on the national team.

1971-72 (24/25):
4th in Soviet Player of the Year voting (behind Maltsev/F, Kharlamov/F, Vikulov/F).

1973-74 (26/27):
World Championship All-Star team.

1974-75 (27/28):
WCh AS team, WCh Best Forward award.
3rd in SPY voting (behind Tretiak/G, Kharlamov/F).

1975-76 (28/29):
Soviet All-Star team, 5th in SPY voting (behind Tretiak/G, Kharlamov/F, Shalimov/F, Maltsev/F).

1980 (33):
Allowed to go abroad as a veteran, plays in Austria -1983.

Interesting scoring records:
1972 Summit Series (USSR vs NHL Team Canada): 7 goals + 4 assists = 11 points (in 8 games)
1974 Summit Series (USSR vs WHA Team Canada): 6 goals + 2 assists = 8 points (in 7 games)
1975-76 Super Series (Krylia Sovietov vs NHL clubs): 1 goal + 3 assists = 4 points (in 4 games)
1977-78 Super Series (Spartak Moscow vs NHL clubs): 1 goal + 3 assists = 5 points (in 5 games)

The case for Yakushev:
-Weaker record than Kharlamov and Mikhailov, but three times top 5 in SPY voting. Second best Soviet LW from 72/73 - 75/76.
-Important contributor when Spartak Moscow upset the stacked Red Army team to win the Soviet Championship in 1969 and 1976.
-Good international record: Two times World Championship All-Star, honoured as Best Forward at the 1975 World Championship.
-Impressive against North American pro teams, solid to outstanding scoring numbers against NHL calibre opponents.

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06-17-2014, 11:56 AM
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I have a soft spot for Yakushev. A definition of clutch and a real class act, on and off the ice.

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06-17-2014, 01:04 PM
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Martinec over Mikhailov is going to be a controversial opinion here.

I think Jiri Holik and Helmut Balderis are more serious candidates for the top 60 than Zhluktov or Vikulov.

Here's a thread on Soviet hockey players from the ATD board: http://hfboards.hockeysfuture.com/sh...php?p=16012181

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06-17-2014, 01:23 PM
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Back in 2010, I did a long comparison of Vladimir Martinec and Alexander Maltsev (with a little Boris Mikhailov) in the ATD. Here is what I wrote, plus some feedback:
http://hfboards.hockeysfuture.com/sh...d.php?t=772275

Mikhailov vs. Martinec vs. Maltsev

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheDevilMadeMe
I. Martinec likely has a better offensive peak than Mikhailov or Maltsev

A. Martinec was the All-Star RW at the World Championships in the middle of the prime of all three (1974, 1975, 1976, 1977)

-Mikhailov was only an All-Star at the WCs twice (1973, 1979)
-Maltsev was an All-Star at the WC in 70, 71, 72, 78, 81 - The gap in the middle is Martinec's prime.

B. Martinec was the best player in the WCs in 1976, competing against prime Mikhailov, Maltsev, and all the 70s Soviet greats

1) Martinec was the top scorer in at the 1976 World Championships, with 20 points in 10 games.

2) He was voted the best forward at the 1976 World Championships

C. The Soviets feard Martinec so much that they felt the need to take him out in the 1974 WCs, similar to what Clarke did to Kharlamov in the Summit Series.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Marcus-74 View Post
Need to go through this all over again?

The Russians really shouldn´t get too high and mighty as the Soviet team did similar things on the ice. I "remember" Vladimir Martinec being brutally taken out (by defenseman Tsygankov) in the key Czechoslovakia game in the ´74 World Championships; and that really wasn´t the only time...
From a thread on Clarke's attack on Kharlamov: http://hfboards.com/showthread.php?t=315349

Quote:
In 1974, the competition was much closer as USSR need to beat Czechoslovakia in the final game to win the gold. USSR was behind 0:1 after the first period. During the intermission a top official from the Russian hockey federation entered the locker room. Bobrov coldly asked him to close the door. From the outside. The official turned red and left the room in anger. In the 2nd period, USSR intimidated the Czechs by playing incredibly hard. The Soviet players had completely abandoned their old hockey style, and the rink was literally scattered with blood. The biggest Czech star, Vladimir Martinec was injured and USSR quickly scored four unanswered goals to win the gold.

The game was bad prestige for USSR
http://forums.internationalhockey.ne...ead.php?t=4201

D. Czechoslovakia was almost as good as the USSR during Martinec's prime and he was the best Czech skater at the time.

1) During the course of Martinec's international career (71-77), the Czechs won 3/7 World Championships (72, 76, 77), and were 5-7-3 against the Soviets overall.


Even before then, the Czechs were apparently right up there with the Soviets:
From 66-72, the Czechs were 12-11-2 against the USSR and 5-5-2 in "meaningful games." Source.

2) Martinec was considered the best Czech player at the time.

a) He won 3 of 4 "Golden Stick" awards for best Czechoslovakian player during this time (73, 75, 76). Goalie Jiri Holocek won in 74.

b) Overall, Martinec won 4 Golden Stick awards (73, 75, 76, 79) - the most ever until Jagr and Hasek.

3. Martinec is the All-Time leading Czechoslovakian scorer in "major international" tournaments by a wide margin.

■135 pts – 69 g – 66 a – 15 appearances — Vladimir MARTINEC
■113 pts – 60 g – 53 a – 17 appearances — Jiri HOLIK
■110 pts – 78 g – 32 a – 11 appearances — Vaclav NEDOMANSKY (all before '74)
■104 pts – 53 g – 51 a – 14 appearances— Ivan HLINKA

4) Nedomansky defected after the 74 WCs. Martinec was undisputed star forward for the Czech National Team afterwards.


II. Maltsev and Mikhailov have slight longevity advantages.

A. Martinec seems to have been a star player from 1971 (when he first joined the national team) to 1979 (his last golden stick win. I believe he led the Czech league in goals that year for the first time, finally playing on a good team).

B. Mikhailov seems to have been a star from 69-80 and Maltsev seems to have been a star from from 69-81.
http://hfboards.com/showthread.php?t=565254

C. Maltsev might have been at his best from 70-72 and Mikhailov might have been at his best from 78-80.

D. This isn’t a huge longevity advantage, but it’s enough to probably make the three players about even in offensive value.

E. First conclusion: Martinec = Mikhailov = Maltsev in pure offensive value

III. Intangibles and other considerations


A. Mikhailov oozes intangibles in a way that perhaps no other non-NHL Euro ever did.

B. Martinec and Maltsev are not known for much besides offense.

C. Martinec and Maltsev were both likely above average defensively, but I haven’t seen anything definitive.

D. The big difference between Maltsev and Martinec is that Maltsev has shown that he didn’t handle physical play very well. Whereas Martinec always bounced right back when physically abused (except when deliberately injured in 1974, but he can hardly be faulted for that. This actually ties into NJ’s gameplan for the series, so I’ll save the details for another post.

Conclusion and All-Time rankings:

Martinec = Mikhailov = Maltsev in terms of offensive value. But Mikhailov definitely beats them in intangibles. So where should they all be ranked on an All-Time list?

-The last HOH Top 100 list ranked Mikhailov as the 68th best player of all time. I think some Soviet greats were underrated on the list (mostly Makarov and Firsov), but I think Mikhailov’s ranking is essentially correct.

-If Mikhailov is the 68th best player of all time, what does that make Martinec and Maltsev, who are essentially his equals offensively, but don’t have his intangibles?

-Martinec should be ranked a bit ahead of Maltsev because his performance doesn’t weaken when physically challenged (more later).
Quote:
Originally Posted by VMBM View Post
Firstly, fine job.

Having seen quite a few games in which he plays (I mean, also in recent years on DVD), one thing I can say about Martinec's defensive play is that he seemed to be used on penalty killing quite often. I believe it was more due to his ability to steal pucks and score on breakaways rather than any great defensive ability, though (kind of like how Gretzky was used [on PK] - and no, I'm not comparing him to Wayner in any way ).
BTW, one big defensive play from Martinec I can remember was in the early 2nd period of the 2nd final of the 1976 Canada Cup when he prevented a sure goal by Team Canada when he broke up a pass from Esposito to Mahovlich in front of the net (with more or less an empty net to shoot at).

All in all, IMO the 'three Ms' are very close to each other. Of course, Mikhailov and Maltsev have the numbers on their side vs. Martinec, but a lot of that can be contributed to the fact that they played for the almighty USSR. It defenitely seems that Martinec was feared by the Soviets (probably mostly in 1974-78) at least as much as Mikhailov and Maltsev were by the Czechoslovaks.

No big differences, but I would rank them:
Mikhailov
Maltsev
Martinec

Skill-wise, it's actually Maltsev and Martinec who were clearly superior to Mikhailov (and of the two, Maltsev maybe having the edge due to his more effortless skating), but like said, Mikhailov had the intangibles and I don't think Martinec and especially Maltsev could ever match him in terms of determination and competitiveness. He was also undoubtedly better than Maltsev in 'big games' and faced far more top NA competition than Martinec.

Martinec had a great peak (from about 1974 to '78), but outside that I think both Mikhailov and Maltsev more or less 'pwn' him. That is the major reason why I would choose also Maltsev over Martinec - though by the slightest of margins.

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06-17-2014, 02:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Theokritos View Post
Since the HOH Top 60 Wingers of All-Time project is now under way, it might be useful to gather some information and thoughts about European wingers of the 1970s who are promising candidates for the top 60 and IMHO deserve to not be left off any preliminary list. I'm especially aiming at the ranking of those players relative to each other.

Not included:
-Players who more often played center than LW/RW. Alexander Maltsev, Václav Nedomanský.
-Players who played more in the 1960s than in the 1970s. Anatoli Firsov.
-Players who must primarily be judged by their NHL and/or WHA career. Anders Hedberg.

The players are, in the order I would rank them:
1) Valeri Kharlamov
2) Vladimír Martinec
3) Boris Mikhailov
4) Alexander Yakushev

Other players who IMO deserve a look: Vladimir Vikulov, Viktor Zhluktov, Helmuts Balderis and Jiří Holík.
Zhluktov was a center.

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06-18-2014, 01:51 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Theokritos View Post
1) Valeri Kharlamov (*Jan 1948), LW
1979 Challenge Cup (USSR vs NHL All-Star team): 0 goals + 1 assist = 1 point (in 3 games)
Kharlamov played only 1 game in the 1979 Challenge Cup; he was injured in the 3rd period of game 1.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Theokritos View Post
[B]2)
2) Vladimír Martinec (*Dec 1949), RW
Interesting scoring records:
1972 CSSR vs NHL Team Canada: zero points (in 1 game) )
This site has Martinec scoring CSSR's 2nd goal in the game, though --> http://hokej.sfrp.cz/trn/trn1973.html

I agree with that; IMO it was Martinec who deflected a B. Stastny shot from the blue line in. But I guess a more 'official' box score has Stastny scoring the goal, so nevermind...

Quote:
1977-78 Pardubice vs NHL clubs: 1 goal + 3 assists = 4 points (in 8 games)
Did Pardubice really play 8 games vs. NHL teams in 1977-78? I thought Poldi Kladno played 4 and Pardubice played also 4 games. http://www.chidlovski.com/personal/1...ld/tesla77.htm


Last edited by VMBM: 06-18-2014 at 02:11 AM.
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06-18-2014, 02:17 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zine View Post
Zhluktov was a center.
Yep, and in any case, rather Kapustin than Zhluktov.

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06-18-2014, 02:56 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheDevilMadeMe View Post
Martinec over Mikhailov is going to be a controversial opinion here.
I'm aware of that, but prime Martinec beat out prime Mikhailov for a World Championship All-Star spot four times in a row.

Quote:
Originally Posted by VMBM View Post
Kharlamov played only 1 game in the 1979 Challenge Cup; he was injured in the 3rd period of game 1. (...) IMO it was Martinec who deflected a B. Stastny shot from the blue line in. But I guess a more 'official' box score has Stastny scoring the goal... (...) I thought Poldi Kladno played 4 and Pardubice played also 4 games.
Thanks for the corrections!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zine View Post
Zhluktov was a center.
Indeed, I mixed him up with Viktor Shalimov. Thanks!

Quote:
Originally Posted by VMBM View Post
Yep, and in any case, rather Kapustin than Zhluktov.
Added.

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06-18-2014, 11:42 PM
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Are there no Swedish/Finnish players that could make a case around this time? I guess they were starting to break into the NHL in greater numbers by the mid-70's, but maybe there was 1 or 2 still playing in europe?

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06-19-2014, 01:43 AM
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Erik kuhnhakl deserves an honourable mention.

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06-19-2014, 08:24 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Art of Sedinery View Post
Are there no Swedish/Finnish players that could make a case around this time? I guess they were starting to break into the NHL in greater numbers by the mid-70's, but maybe there was 1 or 2 still playing in europe?
There probably are a couple of guys, more from the 80's though that also played in the NHL.

This thread seems to be more about 70's guys who didn't.

The non NHL wingers from the 70's, or even guys who spent huge portions of their careers in Europe, Loob and Mats Naslund are 2 names that spring to mind right away) for some later guys will be very hard to slot.

Then throw in a couple of WHA stars who had later success in the NHL in Tardif and Cloutier and then it gets very crowded in any top 60 list, or even 80 (as I presume the initial individual lists will be).

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06-19-2014, 08:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Art of Sedinery View Post
Are there no Swedish/Finnish players that could make a case around this time? I guess they were starting to break into the NHL in greater numbers by the mid-70's, but maybe there was 1 or 2 still playing in europe?
I don't know. USSR and CSSR were far better than any other European countries in the 1970s. Sweden picked up heading into the 1980s, but by then, their best players were generally joining the NHL.

Quote:
Originally Posted by crobro View Post
Erik kuhnhakl deserves an honourable mention.
Isn't he a center?

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06-19-2014, 09:27 AM
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Quote:
Isn't he a center?
So were Europeans Walt Tkaczuk and Thomas Gradin, unfortunately, because if they were wingers they might have a shot at getting recognized in this project unlike the panning they got as a center. All three I have fond memories of from the seventies (yes, I'm closer to fifty *sigh*).

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06-19-2014, 04:23 PM
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Theokritos
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Art of Sedinery View Post
Are there no Swedish/Finnish players that could make a case around this time?
I can't think of any, but maybe somebody else has an idea.

Quote:
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So were Europeans Walt Tkaczuk and Thomas Gradin
Tkaczuk isn't European for the purpose of this thread anyway. He's as Canadian as Stan Mikita at least.

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07-20-2014, 05:32 PM
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TheDevilMadeMe
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I would love a summary of Vikulov vs Kapustin vs Shalimov. I'm assuming Shalimov is a little behind the other two, but Vikulov vs Kapustin as the second tier Soviet stars is worthwhile. And yes, I'm thinking of the bottom of my top 80 list here.

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07-20-2014, 06:09 PM
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skeena1
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Art of Sedinery View Post
Are there no Swedish/Finnish players that could make a case around this time? I guess they were starting to break into the NHL in greater numbers by the mid-70's, but maybe there was 1 or 2 still playing in europe?
Lasse Oksanen attended the Canucks camp in 1970 and played in a few exhibition games.

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07-22-2014, 11:40 PM
  #21
nabby12
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Ulf Nilsson/Anders Hedberg???

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07-23-2014, 01:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nabby12 View Post
Ulf Nilsson/Anders Hedberg???
From the OP:

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Originally Posted by Theokritos View Post

Not included:
-Players who more often played center than LW/RW. Alexander Maltsev, Václav Nedomanský.
-Players who played more in the 1960s than in the 1970s. Anatoli Firsov.
-Players who must primarily be judged by their NHL and/or WHA career. Anders Hedberg.
Ulf Nilsson too. And he was a center anyway.

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07-24-2014, 10:25 AM
  #23
Theokritos
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Vladimir Vikulov (*July 1946), RW

1963-64 (17 years old):
First game in the senior league for CSKA Moscow.

165-66 (19):
Called up to the national team.

1969-70 (23):
Soviet All-Star team, 4th in Soviet Player of the Year voting (behind Konovalenko/G, Maltsev/F, Starshinov/F).

1970-71 (24):
World Championship All-Star team.
Soviet AS team, 2nd in SPY voting (behind Firsov/F).

1971-72 (25):
WCh AS team.
Soviet AS team, 3rd in SPY voting (behind Maltsev/F, Kharlamov/F).

1972-73 (26):
Not a regular member of the national team anymore from March 1973 on.

1979 (32):
Retirement.

Interesting scoring records:
1972 Summit Series (USSR vs NHL Team Canada): 2 goals + 1 assist = 3 points (in 6 games)
1974 Summit Series (USSR vs WHA Team Canada): 0 goals + 4 assists = 4 points (in 4 games)
1975-76 Super Series (CSKA vs NHL clubs): 2 goals + 1 assist = 3 points (in 4 games)
1976 Canada Cup: 4 goals + 3 assists = 7 points (in 4 games)

The case:
-Among the leading Soviet wingers from 1966-1972. Considered one of the top 3 forwards for three years.
-Two times World Championship All-Star at his peak in the early 70s.
-Disappointing in the 1972 Summit Series, career took a nose-dive from there on. Good numbers in the Canada Cup though.

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07-24-2014, 10:26 AM
  #24
Theokritos
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Viktor Shalimov (*Apr 1951), RW

1969 (18 years old):
First game in the senior league for Spartak Moscow.

1974-75 (23):
Becomes a regular on the national team.

1975-76 (24):
Soviet AS team, 3rd in SPY voting (behind Tretiak/G, Kharlamov/F).

1981-82 (30):
World Championship: Best Forward Award - but neither voted on 1st nor 2nd AS team!
Soviet AS team, 4th in SPY voting (behind Fetisov/D, Makarov/F, Tretiak/G).

1985 (34):
Allowed to go abroad as a veteran, plays and coaches in Austria -1988.

Interesting scoring records:
1974 Summit Series (USSR vs WHA Team Canada): 2 goals + 0 assists = 2 points (in 4 games)
1975-76 Super Series (Krylja Sovietov vs NHL clubs): 4 goals + 4 assists = 8 points (in 4 games)
1976 Canada Cup: 0 goals + 1 assist = 1 point (in 1 game)
1981 Canada Cup: 2 goals + 2 assists = 4 points (in 7 games)
1982-83 Super Series (USSR vs NHL clubs): 0 goals + 4 assists = 4 points (in 4 games)

The case:
-Among the leading Soviet wingers from 1975-1982. Twice considered one of the two best forwards.
-No notable peak period.

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07-24-2014, 10:27 AM
  #25
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Helmuts Balderis (*July 1952), RW

1972-73 (20 years old):
His club Dinamo Riga tops the second tier and earns promotion to the first league.

1974-75 (22):
Breakout year for Balderis who is far and away the best scorer on the Riga team.

1975-76 (23):
Called up to the national team.

1976-77 (24):
WCh AS team, Best Forward Award.
Soviet AS team, 1st in SPY voting.

1977-78 (25):
Transfer to CSKA Moscow.
5th in SPY voting.

1980 (28):
Transfer back to Dinamo Riga. Loses his regular spot on the national team.

1985 (33):
Allowed to go abroad as a veteran, plays and coaches in Japan -1989.

1989-1990 (37):
Short stint in the NHL (Minnesota North Stars).

Interesting scoring records:
1976 Canada Cup: 2 goals + 3 assists = 5 points (in 5 games)
1979 Challenge Cup (USSR vs NHL All-Star team): 1 goal + 1 assist = 2 points (in 3 games)
1979-80 Super Series (CSKA vs NHL clubs): 5 goals + 2 assists = 7 points (in 5 games)

The case:
-At his best clearly better than Vikulov, Shalimov and Kapustin, but not much accolade outside of 1977.
-Difficult to rank due to his poisoned relation with Viktor Tikhonov. Allegedly didn't give his all while he had to play for CSKA (77-80). Rarely called up to the national team after 1980 as punishment for tuning his back on CSKA.

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