HFBoards

Go Back   HFBoards > General Hockey Discussion > The Rink
Mobile Hockey's Future Become a Sponsor Site Rules Support Forum vBookie Page 2
Notices

The Rink For the not so ready for prime-time players, coaches, referees, and the people that have to live with them. Discuss experiences in local leagues, coaching tips, equipment, and training.

Stickhandling/Accepting Passes Help

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old
05-14-2007, 12:36 AM
  #1
Coug555
Registered User
 
Coug555's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Tustin, CA
Country: United States
Posts: 1,920
vCash: 500
Stickhandling/Accepting Passes Help

I consider myself a pretty good defenseman but when it comes to offense I am S.O.L. I can't stick handle for the life of me and I have a hard time accepting passes. Sometimes I feel like I get flustered too easy. Do you guys have any tips for me? Any advice would be appreciated.

Coug555 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-14-2007, 12:46 AM
  #2
colton23
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 97
vCash: 500
at home get a golf ball and practice practice practice after awhile it becomes muscle memory and second nature

colton23 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-14-2007, 12:50 AM
  #3
kingpest19
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 11,379
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by colton23 View Post
at home get a golf ball and practice practice practice after awhile it becomes muscle memory and second nature

good advice. Also when recieving passes always cradle the puck. If youve ever seen the mighty ducks movies where hes showing them how to recieve a pass using eggs youll understand. Easiest way to desrcibe it is as the puck hits the stick always move the blade back a bit.

kingpest19 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-14-2007, 09:19 AM
  #4
WhipNash27
Quattro!!
 
WhipNash27's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Westchester, NY
Country: United States
Posts: 17,005
vCash: 500
Yeah what they said. Although instead of a golf ball which tends to be bouncy, try a wood ball or if you're willing to spend $10 or so
http://www.epuck.com/webapp/wcs/stor...egoryId=891745
I've seen it in the ProShop at my rink too, but I'm happy with my wood ball. Epuck used to have one for a couple bucks.

WhipNash27 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-14-2007, 11:08 AM
  #5
Pangolin
Registered User
 
Pangolin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 3,914
vCash: 500
For accepting passes, I've found that putting a piece of tape right across the the front of the blade helped me a lot. The puck almost sticks to it without me having to cradle the puck as much when it comes

Pangolin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-14-2007, 11:58 AM
  #6
EmptyNetter
Registered User
 
EmptyNetter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: North Shore, MA
Country: United States
Posts: 7,541
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coug555 View Post
I consider myself a pretty good defenseman but when it comes to offense I am S.O.L. I can't stick handle for the life of me and I have a hard time accepting passes. Sometimes I feel like I get flustered too easy. Do you guys have any tips for me? Any advice would be appreciated.
Just a few thoughts you might find helpful --
1. Don't over-stick handle. If there's nobody around you just push the puck up the ice and skate after it. There's a tendency to dribble (move the puck to the left and right) when you don't need to and you can overskate the puck.
2. As others have said, use a golf ball or other smooth, heavy ball and practice moving left and right in front of you -- do it quick with a short range of motion and also pull it wide to either side. Do the same dribbling forward and back on your strong side and then on your off-side. Also practice dribbling the puck close to your body as well as far in front of you -- be aware that sliding your lower hand down the stick will help you dribble in close to your body and sliding it up will help you dribble further in front of you.
3. Repeat all of the exercises in #2 while moving your feet. It's one thing to be able to dribble when standing still but you need to make the puck move with you. Take a few steps forward, a few steps back and to either side maintaining control of the puck. Don't forget your front and back crossovers -- dribble while turning left and right in a complete circle.
4. Your coordination will improve by building your arm strength, your triceps especially. Also, dribble a basketball from one hand to the other, on your left, on your right, etc. It's a similar movement, it's (probably) a better upper body exercise and it will be easier to do now that the weather's improving.

You're on your own with regards to receiving passes. I'm terrible at it.

EmptyNetter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-14-2007, 12:12 PM
  #7
nni
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 1,715
vCash: 500
receiving a hard pass takes a little getting used to. to practice, exagerate the movement, when the puck is approaching you start moving your stick back so when you are receiving it your stick is moving away from the puck. as you get used to it, the movement will be significantly less, but start out by making the moving a large sweeping movement.

stick handling is all getting use to the feel of the puck on your stick. get a ball, whatever you can get and just practice moving it back and forth faster and faster.

nni is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-14-2007, 12:29 PM
  #8
Coug555
Registered User
 
Coug555's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Tustin, CA
Country: United States
Posts: 1,920
vCash: 500
Thanks for all the advice guys. I am going to try this stuff out.

Coug555 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-14-2007, 03:16 PM
  #9
TBLfan
Registered User
 
TBLfan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Tampa, FL
Posts: 1,148
vCash: 500
Send a message via AIM to TBLfan
wood sticks/blades are more forgiving, if you're using a composite OPS/Blade you might want to consider trying a two-piece with a wood blade or a woodie. Other than that, practice.

TBLfan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-14-2007, 08:06 PM
  #10
Wooty
Registered User
 
Wooty's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Harbor City, CA
Country: United States
Posts: 4,027
vCash: 500
Most often, you are taught to cradle the puck a the level of the blade. The puck comes to you and you move your blade in the same direction the puck is moving.

Try this

Think about moving the top hand at the puck's path. Make sense? Changing your focus to a different part of your body may make it feel better for you.


For stick handling, put your hands out and away from your body. Shorter sticks make it easier. Work on side to side and front to back.

Wooty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-14-2007, 09:47 PM
  #11
crashlanding
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Chicago
Country: United States
Posts: 7,605
vCash: 500
You could also be holding your stick too tight. A looser grip helps with stickhandling and receiving passes.

While it's important to be able to stickhandle with the puck close to your skates from time to time, try to keep it out in front of you if possible. It's a lot easier to move the puck far and away from a defender when the puck isn't in your skates and it's much harder for the defenseman to poke check it away from you.

crashlanding is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-15-2007, 12:14 AM
  #12
McNasty
Registered User
 
McNasty's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Rutgers
Country: United States
Posts: 6,225
vCash: 500
When handling a pass its also important to make sure your stick is down and your blade is positioned right, this way it won't deflect off your blade and go in a direction you don't want it to go, I would take a hockey ball, toss it in the freezer and just practice passing off of a wall or street curb would even be sufficient. Start from your forehand hit it hard and make it deflect to your back hand, then with your backhand put it off the curb and recieve it on the forehand, the only way this is going to be helpful is if you keep it going as fast as you can. This helps you recieve passes from both sides, as well as be able to get a pass off faster if your in traffic. When you get the hang of this start stickhandling while you do it also, then try 2 balls. My dad had me do this for 15-20 minutes a day and it paid off almost immediately.

McNasty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-15-2007, 09:18 AM
  #13
Phoenix
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 300
vCash: 500
Like this post - i also suck at receiving passes - there honestly is a hole in the middle of my stick.

Phoenix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-15-2007, 03:03 PM
  #14
Wooty
Registered User
 
Wooty's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Harbor City, CA
Country: United States
Posts: 4,027
vCash: 500
Are you missing the puck or is it hittng your stick and bouncing off?

If you are missing it, get your eyes checked and improve your hand/eye coordination. Play catch without a mitt or glove. Try to juggle 3 soft things.

Wooty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-15-2007, 08:51 PM
  #15
Phoenix
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 300
vCash: 500
I'm missing it - i think its when I don't watch the puck actually come closer to my stick - i tend to watch it at a distance, then not follow it...my coordination is not quite yet up to scratch unfortunately.

And its always "on the fly", or if I get a fast puck directed at my feet...actually there's a question: for those pucks that come to your feet, do you
a) tend to still try and move away so your stick can be positioned there, or
b) do you try and somehow get a flat piece of stick blade onto the ice in front of your feet.

The latter is a problem, because i miss a lot when trying to use the tip of my blade to receive lol.

I can receive perfectly if I'm stationary in drills but not so in a game.

I am a bit short-sighted too though, but IMO not to the point where I need correction on the ice. Of course it'd be nice if I had 20/20...I'd be able to see player faces thru masks/cages more easily.

Phoenix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-16-2007, 01:56 PM
  #16
94now
Registered User
 
94now's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Snow Belt, USA
Country: United Nations
Posts: 6,455
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phoenix View Post
I'm missing it - i think its when I don't watch the puck actually come closer to my stick - i tend to watch it at a distance, then not follow it...my coordination is not quite yet up to scratch unfortunately.

And its always "on the fly", or if I get a fast puck directed at my feet...actually there's a question: for those pucks that come to your feet, do you
a) tend to still try and move away so your stick can be positioned there, or
b) do you try and somehow get a flat piece of stick blade onto the ice in front of your feet.
Neither. Use your skates to control the puck. In order tp develop that skill put your stick on the bench and skate with the puck without the stick by moving the puck with you skates. Too hard? Try first to move the puck with your skate back and forth while stationary. Also, toe drag the puck toward your feet and kick it back in front of you. Then toe drag close again.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Phoenix View Post
The latter is a problem, because i miss a lot when trying to use the tip of my blade to receive lol.

I can receive perfectly if I'm stationary in drills but not so in a game.

I am a bit short-sighted too though, but IMO not to the point where I need correction on the ice. Of course it'd be nice if I had 20/20...I'd be able to see player faces thru masks/cages more easily.
Last thing you want to look at is the face. All you have to know about the defenders is their part from the waste down.

94now is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-16-2007, 02:10 PM
  #17
TBLfan
Registered User
 
TBLfan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Tampa, FL
Posts: 1,148
vCash: 500
Send a message via AIM to TBLfan
also for a puck at your feet that you can't kick out(maybe you need to get a quick shot off) you can spread your legs and it makes it easier to control the puck... As fantsy and showboatie as it seems, sometimes you are almost forced to shoot from between your legs or basically you'll lose the puck to a defenseman or a goalie. Many scoring chances are lost when you try to kick it out and you don't have the room.

But as 94now said, more often than not you use your feet... takes practice but it will come in time.

TBLfan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-17-2007, 08:45 AM
  #18
Phoenix
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 300
vCash: 500
Gee that would make things easier - thanks for that tip. Didn't really realise that's what people did.

Phoenix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-17-2007, 01:40 PM
  #19
TBLfan
Registered User
 
TBLfan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Tampa, FL
Posts: 1,148
vCash: 500
Send a message via AIM to TBLfan
not everyone does it, most try to kick it but it's a neat little trick that makes it easier to get a quick shot off... and most goalies don't expect it.

TBLfan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-20-2007, 01:09 PM
  #20
sorno
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 16
vCash: 500
Go to the usa hockey website and do the drills shown on the bottom of the page. Use a golf ball, wooden stickhandling ball, or other such device. It does take hours of practice.

http://www.usahockey.com/ntdp/main_site/main/ntdp/

sorno is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Forum Jump


Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:46 PM.

monitoring_string = "e4251c93e2ba248d29da988d93bf5144"

vBulletin Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
HFBoards.com is a property of CraveOnline Media, LLC, an Evolve Media, LLC company. 2016 All Rights Reserved.