HFBoards

Go Back   HFBoards > General Hockey Discussion > The Rink
Mobile Hockey's Future Become a Sponsor Site Rules Support Forum vBookie Page 2
Notices

The Rink For the not so ready for prime-time players, coaches, referees, and the people that have to live with them. Discuss experiences in local leagues, coaching tips, equipment, and training.

Defense question, 2 on 1

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old
05-17-2007, 12:53 AM
  #1
ThatOneGuy*
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 1,637
vCash: 500
Defense question, 2 on 1

Im a foward but I plan on playing defense when I start playing ice. I play inline hockey right now and I want to improve my defensive game.

Today, I bailed out my defenseman on and it ended up being a two on one. Im skating backwards, cheating a little bit towards the puckhandler, blocking the passing lane with my stick. Keep in mind this is no-contact. If I try to poke check the puckhandlers stick he'll more than likely thread the needle and it'll end up in the net.

Anyways, I was skating backwards, puckhandler faked his shot and tried a pass. The pass hit my skate and into the net.

Did I make a bad play? What would you have done in a non-conact league?

I really can't think of anyway else to play it. I guess I could blame the goalie for cheating but I felt respondsible.

Any input would be nice.

ThatOneGuy* is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-17-2007, 01:02 AM
  #2
Pangolin
Registered User
 
Pangolin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 3,914
vCash: 500
On a 2-on-1, the goalie should play the shot and the dman play the pass. At least that's my understanding of it. So I think you did what you're suppose to.

Pangolin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-17-2007, 01:25 AM
  #3
Happy Pony
Registered User
 
Happy Pony's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Columbus
Country: United States
Posts: 2,659
vCash: 500
Gotta take the man without the puck. Let the goalie worry about the other guy. Stay in the middle (if anything, cheat towards the guy without the puck) keep your stick moving and stay in the passing lane.

Bad breaks are part of the game.

Happy Pony is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-17-2007, 02:04 AM
  #4
ThatOneGuy*
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 1,637
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by trlewis4 View Post
Gotta take the man without the puck. Let the goalie worry about the other guy. Stay in the middle (if anything, cheat towards the guy without the puck) keep your stick moving and stay in the passing lane.

Bad breaks are part of the game.

When should I make a move? I mean, is there a certain point where I should pressure the man with the puck? I was two feet infront of the crease when the deflection happened, did I wait too long?

Thanks

ThatOneGuy* is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-17-2007, 03:00 AM
  #5
Happy Pony
Registered User
 
Happy Pony's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Columbus
Country: United States
Posts: 2,659
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThatOneGuy View Post
When should I make a move? I mean, is there a certain point where I should pressure the man with the puck? I was two feet infront of the crease when the deflection happened, did I wait too long?

Thanks
You shouldn't pressure the man with the puck until the only option he has is to shoot. Generally, let the goalie play the shot. Really you want to slow down the play until help (back-checker) arrives, then you want to communicate with the back-checker as to who will take whom.

The safest thing to do is to communicate with your goalie before the game and afterwards, as well as during the play to find out how he prefers you to play the 2 on 1.

Happy Pony is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-17-2007, 05:51 AM
  #6
FLYLine27
BrassGod
 
FLYLine27's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: NY
Country: United States
Posts: 38,298
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThatOneGuy View Post
When should I make a move? I mean, is there a certain point where I should pressure the man with the puck? I was two feet infront of the crease when the deflection happened, did I wait too long?

Thanks
Its hard to say when you should have become a bit more aggressive...it depends on what the puck carrier does...sometimes he won't mess up at all and you just have to stand your ground and block the passing lane and let him take the shot.


Sometimes i'm able to stay in the middle while moving toward him a bit (note i'm still blocking the passing lane well enough) that it forces him to the outside a bit more. If you can do that then that will help your goalie out when he comes time to shoot. Just dont over commit to either player. If you see him fumble with the puck for a quick second try to do a quick poke check (but don't go out of position).

2 on 1's are hard to get down perfect, but over time IMO you'll get better and your hockey sense picks up in that situation.

Like I wrote in another thread, I love being the defenseman in a 2 on 1, thats something i've mastered since moving back to defense 2 years ago.

FLYLine27 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-17-2007, 08:22 AM
  #7
Steelhead16
Registered User
 
Steelhead16's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Boise, ID
Country: United States
Posts: 1,605
vCash: 500
There are many things to consider in a shortamount of time playing a 2 on 1. As a forward it sounds like you played like you should have. Bad bounces just happen, we've all been there. After you move back to defense like you say you will there are a few different things you can do in those situations to improve your odds. Most 2 on 1 plays usually at least are from the red line in. I try to quickly assess the 2 opponents and decide who I want to keep the puck. If one of them is on his backhand I pick that one. Otherwise I try and keep the shooter to my goalies glove side. I use the neutral zone to either force a pass to the guy I want to shoot or to play the other guy so my shooter keeps it if he already has it. Give the goalie as much time to play the shooter as possible. Then stay in the passing lane and make sure your goalie doesn't have to go side to side for a shot. Making sure there is no pass is your job. You are also responsible for the rebound after the shot so don't wander off with your guy after the play moves into the slot and crease area.
Hope that helps a little and don't sweat your play off your skate, it's just the hazard of the job. I'm sure your goalie would rather have that happen than for you coast back and watch a 2 on 0 go in.

Steelhead16 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-17-2007, 01:31 PM
  #8
sc37
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: OH-IO
Country: Hong Kong
Posts: 1,576
vCash: 700
A lot have said to play the pass...but just go and ask your goalie what do the want you to do exactly. Personally, I've had goalies who like to have the D cheat a little to play the shot...ask what they want and try to go from there. But as with all defensive play, you wanna try to force the issue before it's too late, probably near the tops of the circles.

sc37 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-17-2007, 02:30 PM
  #9
McNasty
Registered User
 
McNasty's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Rutgers
Country: United States
Posts: 6,190
vCash: 500
Don't just lay your stick down flat, a good player is gonna pop a saucer pass right over that, as a forward what drives me nuts is when the defender controls the situation. As a defender if you force me to shoot or pass it really makes things tough. If you can stay in the passing lane feel free to make a quick poke at the puckcarrier, and then drop immediately. (note: practice that a bit before trying it in a game)

McNasty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-17-2007, 05:41 PM
  #10
MikeD
Registered User
 
MikeD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Buffalo NY
Country: United States
Posts: 1,066
vCash: 500
You want to play the pass but stay in a position that does not allow the puck carrier to have access to the middle or be able to cut through the slot. Being non-contact that would mean staying slightly ahead as far as depth into your zone. Should you take this all the way to the crease you would want to end up just to your goalies weak side. Staying at the middle of the ice just to the goalies far side of the carrier. Be aware of your skate blades. On a shot or pass deeper than the top of the circle, you would turn to face the shooter. Any deflection off the skates would generally be safe. In the case that this would put your stick hand on the wrong side to defend the pass turn to face the trailer if reaching the pass is a stretch. If you do these things, no goalie can fault you.

MikeD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-17-2007, 05:43 PM
  #11
Reckless Abandon*
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Country: United States
Posts: 2,601
vCash: 500
Personally, I probably would've played the puck in that situation, especially if you weren't that deep in the zone... but I can't really say without seeing the play, or being put in the situation.

Reckless Abandon* is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-17-2007, 05:47 PM
  #12
Meichel Kane
My Name Is
 
Meichel Kane's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Country: United States
Posts: 10,631
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThatOneGuy View Post
When should I make a move? I mean, is there a certain point where I should pressure the man with the puck? I was two feet infront of the crease when the deflection happened, did I wait too long?

Thanks
Well, don't key on the guy without the puck so much that the puckhandler can just walk right in. At a point you have to start gliding over, cutting off the puckhandler from walking in while still cutting off the pass. That's mostly instinct - you'll get better as you play more.

When I'm in goal, I don't blame the guy if it goes off of him and by me. He did what he was supposed to do...it just didn't turn out well (although it's very annoying watching a ball/puck roll by you almost in slo-mo).

Meichel Kane is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-17-2007, 05:51 PM
  #13
Wisent
Registered User
 
Wisent's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Mannheim
Country: Germany
Posts: 3,667
vCash: 500
Nothing to add. Let the goalie take the shot you take the passing lane. It is much harder for the goalie to get into position if the pass is played than it is for you to block the lane. If you are close enough you can try to pokecheck. But still don`t give up the passing line. Go with the check from the inside of the rink and move it to him. If he carries the puck/ball on the other side, there is nothing you can do. Try moving towards him so he has to go outside. That`ll give your goalie a better angle.

Wisent is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-17-2007, 08:54 PM
  #14
JLHockeyKnight
IMA Real American
 
JLHockeyKnight's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: North Central Jersey
Country: United States
Posts: 19,438
vCash: 500
I don't think you did anything wrong. Most goalies would like you to play the pass, you did that properly it sounds like, just sounds like you got caught with a bad deflection. It happens.

JLHockeyKnight is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-17-2007, 09:17 PM
  #15
RJ8812*
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Sudbury
Country: Canada
Posts: 28,513
vCash: 500
you played it fine, you just had a bad break

RJ8812* is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Forum Jump


Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:14 PM.

monitoring_string = "e4251c93e2ba248d29da988d93bf5144"

vBulletin Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
HFBoards.com is a property of CraveOnline Media, LLC, an Evolve Media, LLC company. 2016 All Rights Reserved.