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Old
05-17-2007, 01:23 PM
  #51
Doctor House
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Originally Posted by e-e View Post
here's the thing....i've been using "couple" as a "few" in years. i was shocked when recently friend of mine corrected me that "couple" means TWO and only TWO...no more no less...just 2.

so i've asked him if somebody says for example :
couple of years ago....or crosby in the comercial saying: just couple of more minutes...does he really mean two? not generaly few?

can you give me you opinon? i'd had no idea that i've been using in wrong way for years...

thanks a lot

Depends where you are.

In Canada and the UK couple means "a few."

In the US its not as clear cut - when I used it in Texas & MidWest US they thought I actually meant two. The East and West coast were more flexible and used it as the Canadians/the British.

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05-17-2007, 01:47 PM
  #52
Gros Bill
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Originally Posted by mcphee View Post
I was going to use a 'flat as the top of my head' line, but I got nothing Bill.

Really though, the uhhh, U sound, doesn't exist in French does it ? Horse and Buggy ?
The U in buggy? Sure, we have that in french, but it's what we call a round o. As in "un bogue informatique". As for your squarish head, I thought the "think outside the box" thread was about you.

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05-17-2007, 01:49 PM
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mcphee
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Originally Posted by Gros Bill View Post
The U in buggy? Sure, we have that in french, but it's what we call a round o. As in "un bogue informatique". As for your squarish head, I thought the "think outside the box" thread was about you.

Thanks, kind of an out of body experience.

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05-17-2007, 01:51 PM
  #54
Gros Bill
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Thanks, kind of an out of body experience.
We aim to please

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05-17-2007, 03:23 PM
  #55
e-e
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Originally Posted by Doctor House View Post
Depends where you are.

In Canada and the UK couple means "a few."

In the US its not as clear cut - when I used it in Texas & MidWest US they thought I actually meant two. The East and West coast were more flexible and used it as the Canadians/the British.
i'm in canada

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05-17-2007, 03:50 PM
  #56
Chris Nilan
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Originally Posted by Gros Bill View Post
The U in buggy? Sure, we have that in french, but it's what we call a round o. As in "un bogue informatique". As for your squarish head, I thought the "think outside the box" thread was about you.
That's a great example. I was going to offer "Hogue" as in Benoit, which would be pronounced most closely as "ugh" (Claude Quenneville's version) and not "Hoe-gue" as they always did on CBC.

Another example is in Pouliot. The last syllable is more "ut" than Derek Wills' "aught."

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05-20-2007, 09:50 PM
  #57
Ohashi_Jouzu
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Doctor House View Post
Depends where you are.

In Canada and the UK couple means "a few."

In the US its not as clear cut - when I used it in Texas & MidWest US they thought I actually meant two. The East and West coast were more flexible and used it as the Canadians/the British.
I am also from Canada, with Scottish and English roots at the grandfather level, and we all agree that a "few" people can't get married to each other in any of the three countries. We also agree that if you say that you'll be back in a couple of minutes, you better not come back in 4 or 5 minutes, or we'll finish your beer on ya.

"Improper" use is rampant, but the correct use hasn't changed. That's the bottom line. Bottom line post-script: most people don't think enough about what they want to say before they say it.

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