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Passes from behind question

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Old
07-10-2007, 07:54 AM
  #1
Phoenix
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Passes from behind question

Ok -this is hopefully a simple question...I'm a beginner player and one of my problems is receiving a pass from one of the defencemen directly behind me (am a forward wing). Haven't quite reached enough coordination and skill to take it fast on the fly, so does anyone have any tips? I find it difficult to skate forward, watch behind me and twist my body to receive a pass, but the alternative is to skate backward and take longer to make a forward transition. I'm finding I'm losing the puck half the time to the other team in these situations.

How should I approach this?

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07-10-2007, 08:03 AM
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I'm sure what I'm about to say is going to be debated. But I can think of three reasons, off the top of my head, why you're not catching that pass.

1. Inexperience-just practice giving and receiving passes on your backhand and it'll come together eventually.

2. The lie of your stick is incorrect and is making it nearly impossible for you to receive the pass. i.e. when your stick is down the tip of the blade is coming off the ice, while the heel is on the ice making your stick look like a V instead of an L.

3. As long as your stick is on the ice, it's not your fault you're not receiving that pass. The responsibility of you being able to receive a pass is from the sender (defenseman), who is thus giving you bad passes.

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07-10-2007, 08:17 AM
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Grave77digger
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I have the same problem so I tell the D to try to bank the puck off the board so it bounces out in fornt of me and I can get it in full stride.

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07-10-2007, 08:27 AM
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slade
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inexperienced dmen will try to pass directly at you when youre backturned- you are bound to get railed at open ice.

curl back a little further into the defensive zone and take passes from a closer angle.

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07-10-2007, 08:37 AM
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WhipNash27
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I love it when defensemen will pass it to your left when you're a righty playing left wing and then you have to stop and turn around to receive the pass.

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07-10-2007, 09:47 AM
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technophile
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While it would be nice if every pass could be perfectly placed, in all honesty you're going to have to deal with passes from weird angles and inconvenient angles anyway (among other things, intercepting passes from the other team uses the same skills), so I would just say practice. Go to some stick-and-pucks and have someone feed you those kinds of passes until you figure out how best to handle them.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ShowmeHawks View Post
As long as your stick is on the ice, it's not your fault you're not receiving that pass. The responsibility of you being able to receive a pass is from the sender (defenseman), who is thus giving you bad passes.
There are lots of other reasons he could be missing the pass. Catching a pass is much more than just having your stick on the ice and expecting someone to hit your tape with their pass in such a manner that the puck doesn't bounce at all. I mean, yeah, putting the puck where it can be received is the passer's responsibility, and ideally it's a nice soft pass right into the tape, but in game situations you have to learn to deal with imperfect passes, in a hurry, from a rolling, bouncing puck, etc. Blaming the D isn't going to help anyone.

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Originally Posted by NYRChazzer View Post
I love it when defensemen will pass it to your left when you're a righty playing left wing and then you have to stop and turn around to receive the pass.
Maybe the D didn't have the option to put it on your right, because that would be a (very dangerous) pass up the center of the ice. Or there was a forechecker with his stick in that lane, and the only thing the D could do was put it off the boards.

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07-10-2007, 09:57 AM
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Good advice from Slade-further on that line, skate diagonally 45* up ice when your team is "breaking out". I like drills where kids criss cross and hit forward man with lead pass.

Basic horse shoe drill teaches players to receive pass on the fly and gives passer practise on timing pass so its in front/stick side of player receiving the pass. Good variation once thats mastered is to have players carry puck out of D zone corner, hit man just as he comes out of 'curl' on the fly. Better than passer just standing with puck, gets them used to timing passes while skating.

Passer of course then skates to blue line in other end, curls and takes a pass (in case someone isn't familiar with horse shoe drill) great drill, ends with shot on net so goalies also involved.

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07-10-2007, 10:19 AM
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Crosbyfan
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Look back and concentrate really hard on the puck. As it approaches, see if you can pick it off with your skate up to your stick, or failing this try to get it with your stick, all the while looking back with your stick on the ice out in front of you. If you do this correctly you should wake up with a pretty good headache.

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07-10-2007, 11:16 AM
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sc37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Phoenix View Post
Ok -this is hopefully a simple question...I'm a beginner player and one of my problems is receiving a pass from one of the defencemen directly behind me (am a forward wing). Haven't quite reached enough coordination and skill to take it fast on the fly, so does anyone have any tips? I find it difficult to skate forward, watch behind me and twist my body to receive a pass, but the alternative is to skate backward and take longer to make a forward transition. I'm finding I'm losing the puck half the time to the other team in these situations.

How should I approach this?
You losing the puck due to them pinching in a bit too or is it just you missing the pass. Practice will fix your receiving the puck, but if they are pinching, ain't always a bad idea to skate backwards to hlep protect it a little, or skate at the puck even and make a pass to another teammate heading up ice.

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07-10-2007, 04:14 PM
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I'm not very experienced, but I'd like to second the advice of those suggesting that you skate at an angle so you're never getting the pass directly from behind.

Receiving a direct-from-behind pass takes a lot of skill, IMO. Also, I was told by a coach that it can be very dangerous because your're not looking into direction you're skating and if an open-ice check comes you'll be totally unprepared.

Once I played with a very good D, and he told me not to worry about catching such passes from him. He said he'll pass a little slower that usual so even if the puck misses my blade I'll be able to chase and catch it, going into offensive zone.

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07-10-2007, 08:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sc37 View Post
You losing the puck due to them pinching in a bit too or is it just you missing the pass. Practice will fix your receiving the puck, but if they are pinching, ain't always a bad idea to skate backwards to hlep protect it a little, or skate at the puck even and make a pass to another teammate heading up ice.
The D-man is a much better player than me! But what happens is in the defensive zone when the dman starts skating up to me, I start skating up too to keep in front, and I'm not able to receive a pass, watch where I'm going, and make sure i don't lose the puck in the process by being intercepted or simply overskating it! Its particularly if its on my backhand.

Ideally, should I be just trying to skate "sideways", ie. my back to the opposite direction in which the dman is skating.

I'll try skate on an angle more, that sounds like a good idea.

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07-10-2007, 08:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by technophile View Post
Go to some stick-and-pucks and have someone feed you those kinds of passes until you figure out how best to handle them.
Boy would i love to if they existed where i live!

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07-10-2007, 08:40 PM
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Well your D man shouldn't be passing it to you if you can't see the pass coming. Rule of thumb is if the D man can see your numbers, clearly, then he shouldn't use you as an option. To make yourself available, you should be skating at a 45 degree angle or perpendicular to your defense so you can be available for a pass.

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07-10-2007, 08:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Phoenix View Post
The D-man is a much better player than me! But what happens is in the defensive zone when the dman starts skating up to me, I start skating up too to keep in front, and I'm not able to receive a pass, watch where I'm going, and make sure i don't lose the puck in the process by being intercepted or simply overskating it! Its particularly if its on my backhand.

Ideally, should I be just trying to skate "sideways", ie. my back to the opposite direction in which the dman is skating.

I'll try skate on an angle more, that sounds like a good idea.
Yeah...when I'm up front, I'd usually make a loop around the faceoff dot before heading out of the zone to make myself an open target. But sounds like the whole team might just need to get an organized breakout play to alleviate some of these problems.

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07-11-2007, 12:00 AM
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WhiskeyYourTheDevils
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Practice will do you the most good.

me and my brother would go down in our basement (about 25X15 feet) and practice circling and receiving passes from behind. Once we mastered that, we decided that to make ourselves better, we'd give eachother saucer passes and passes that werent always flat or on the ground. Ive found that this has helped my pass reception and handeye coordination alot.

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07-11-2007, 12:51 AM
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YoungJames
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I try to avoid intercepting a pass that comes directly behind me. The main reason for this is that d-men in the league are experienced enough to open-ice-hammer-hit me the second I turn my head back. I've been umbergered a couple of times and I've learned my lesson.

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07-11-2007, 02:07 AM
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Steelhead16
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I agree with skating at an angle if at all possible. Angle toward your backhand if you can so the pass has to come to your forehand side. I usually try and angle them off my skate as well but that takes some practice. If you truly get a pass from directly behind you, try and just let it come between your skates so you don't get contorted all around. You will lose sight of it for a second but your balance will be better. I like them on my backhand when I play it that way, but whichever feels better for you is fine. I am assuming that you are playing in a non-contact league? Otherwise ignore all that and just wait for it to go by and chase it. Playing D there was nothing better than a guy looking back for a pass. It was like a birthday present getting to hand him his head.

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07-11-2007, 03:44 AM
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Phoenix
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Playing D there was nothing better than a guy looking back for a pass. It was like a birthday present getting to hand him his head.
yep, no checking.

kewl, thanks for the pointers guys, cannot wait to get back on the ice and try and get it right.

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07-14-2007, 08:49 PM
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imho,if i can watch it to my stick i try and take it on the heel(seems to deaden the puck).if it comes from directly behind i'll put the blade down in front of me where i think it's going to reappear.sometimes i'll reach back and deflect the puck directly between my skates and turn and charge after it to not lose speed.you also have to be prepared to knock it out of the air with your skate ,stickblade or glove if you want to be good.remember if you hang around at center ice you better be able to recieve a nasty pass and also have good finish once you get it or your career as a seagull will be short.those d-men have a knack for intercepting all but the hardest and highest passes.

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07-28-2007, 11:44 PM
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You have a few options:
-shift either left or right, and turn your shoulders to get your stick on it
-while it is the d-man's fault, try not to skate straight up ice while he's looking to make a pass
-my personal favourite: turn around and start skating towards your own goal. This may not be a good choice if you're a beginner, but I'm one of the better in my league (houseleague, because I suck or something), and I find going in the opposite direction really shakes the defenders, and makes the pass easier to receive.
-if you really have to, let come beside you or between your legs, and angle your stick so you stop it (you're going to have a real hard time if the blade is parallel to your skates)

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07-29-2007, 12:19 AM
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CorpseFX
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slade View Post
inexperienced dmen will try to pass directly at you when youre backturned- you are bound to get railed at open ice.

curl back a little further into the defensive zone and take passes from a closer angle.
BINGO
thats called a buddy pass
ask brett favre about those too in football.

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07-29-2007, 01:32 AM
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SoundwaveIsCharisma
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As a part-time defenseman (in other words I keep getting on teams with cherry pickers in every position) if I'm passing to someone directly in front of me I either chip it off the boards hard, or a whip a pass hard enough so that it should get in front of them. I always try to pass so that it will be where they will be instead of where they were.

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07-29-2007, 01:46 AM
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SoundwaveIsCharisma
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[QUOTE=technophile;9872629]While it would be nice if every pass could be perfectly placed, in all honesty you're going to have to deal with passes from weird angles and inconvenient angles anyway (among other things, intercepting passes from the other team uses the same skills), so I would just say practice. Go to some stick-and-pucks and have someone feed you those kinds of passes until you figure out how best to handle them.


There are lots of other reasons he could be missing the pass. Catching a pass is much more than just having your stick on the ice and expecting someone to hit your tape with their pass in such a manner that the puck doesn't bounce at all. I mean, yeah, putting the puck where it can be received is the passer's responsibility, and ideally it's a nice soft pass right into the tape, but in game situations you have to learn to deal with imperfect passes, in a hurry, from a rolling, bouncing puck, etc. Blaming the D isn't going to help anyone.


Maybe the D didn't have the option to put it on your right, because that would be a (very dangerous) pass up the center of the ice. Or there was a forechecker with his stick in that lane, and the only thing the D could do was put it off the boards.[/QUOTE

There are a ton of reasons why some passes just seem to be impossible to receive. I do agree though that if the passer gives it to you in a semi-receivable, not suicide-pass manner it's on you to work with it. I did hate one of my old lines where they totally underestimated my speed and would end up passing behind me, I'd be forced to go back, or go in at a much slower speed then I'm comfortable with.

But yea, the worst thing a defenseman can do is throw you suicide passes. I did love it as an opposing player when that happened though, usually I'd let up if the guy was a rookie, but if you give me too many chances...

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07-30-2007, 02:36 PM
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LordHelmet
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If you're getting passes sent to you from directly behind, you're taking off too early. If a teammate has a puck, you should always be at an angle to him.

The only exception is if you're a wing along the boards and the D-man is skating it along the same side. In this case, you should skate backwards along the boards to provide a last-resort outlet.

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07-30-2007, 02:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EndBoards View Post
If you're getting passes sent to you from directly behind, you're taking off too early. If a teammate has a puck, you should always be at an angle to him.

The only exception is if you're a wing along the boards and the D-man is skating it along the same side. In this case, you should skate backwards along the boards to provide a last-resort outlet.
What he said.

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