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Russian Players (1987-1990 born generation)

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Old
05-07-2017, 12:40 PM
  #1
MaxV
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Russian Players (1987-1990 born generation)

Looking at Russian hockey, it's actually really strange.

There is a really noticeable gap among top players during the 1987-1990 birth years.

The 1986-born and older generations are very talented and plenty of them are still going strong. Russian hockey seems to have experienced a little boom starting with 1991-born players.

But what about the 1987-1990? What happened here? Is this the generation that was impacted the most by the 90s financial crisis in Russia?

These are the players that should be in the midst of their prime (26-30), but there are so few of them from Russia.

There are Bobrovskiy, Varlamov, Schipachyov, Dadonov, Anisimov and Voynov. That's about it.

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05-07-2017, 02:14 PM
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Pavel Buchnevich
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Doesn't help that the best skater of that generation for Russia died tragically before he got to his prime.

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05-07-2017, 02:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MaxV View Post
Looking at Russian hockey, it's actually really strange.

There is a really noticeable gap among top players during the 1987-1990 birth years.

The 1986-born and older generations are very talented and plenty of them are still going strong. Russian hockey seems to have experienced a little boom starting with 1991-born players.

But what about the 1987-1990? What happened here? Is this the generation that was impacted the most by the 90s financial crisis in Russia?

These are the players that should be in the midst of their prime (26-30), but there are so few of them from Russia.

There are Bobrovskiy, Varlamov, Schipachyov, Dadonov, Anisimov and Voynov. That's about it.
Well, yes it is.

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05-07-2017, 02:21 PM
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TheProspector
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I don't know. I seem to remember something going on at the time, but I can't quite put my finger on it.

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05-07-2017, 03:02 PM
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malkinfan
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Yes of course but its not like they started playing hockey out of the womb. The generation to have been hit harder in theory should have been the guys starting to play hockey at time of the fall of the union (say 83-85).

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05-07-2017, 03:33 PM
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MaxV
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Originally Posted by TheProspector View Post
I don't know. I seem to remember something going on at the time, but I can't quite put my finger on it.
Well, obviously that has something to do with it. Post Soviet transition wasn't easy and many government-sponsored programs (like hockey) suffered.

But I'm still a bit confused why this was the generation that got hit the hardest.

Why not the Datsyuk/Kovalchuk or Ovechkin/Malkin generations?

I would think that the Tarasenko/Panarin/Kuznetsov generation already had a more stable environment.

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05-07-2017, 04:20 PM
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Originally Posted by malkinfan View Post
Yes of course but its not like they started playing hockey out of the womb. The generation to have been hit harder in theory should have been the guys starting to play hockey at time of the fall of the union (say 83-85).
The whole Soviet hockey school system also didn't die at one moment, it survived for some time, not for to long though, I'd say until around 1994.

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05-08-2017, 07:04 AM
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For 1990 born players there is lack of good players not only in Russia but also in rest of other countries.
There is simply too few players talented equally compared to for example Stamkos, Tavares or Victor Hedman simply very few players.

Players like Plotnikov, Filatov etc are typical "B" grade players.

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05-08-2017, 01:52 PM
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Like Caser said, the system didn't all collapse at once, although it was a rapid decline.

The 1987-1990 born players would've starting entering hockey schools around 1994-97 when the program was at its worst.


Last edited by Zine: 05-08-2017 at 04:05 PM.
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05-10-2017, 11:25 AM
  #10
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During the Soviet era, there were reportedly fewer than 80 indoor rinks in the entire USSR. That is far less than the Toronto metropolitan area alone. But those that existed were intensively used. There was good, paid coaching, and the kids were drilled with intensity to reach a level of proficiency. After 1991, rinks closed from lack of funds, and even pro players failed to receive paychecks for months at a time. The situation improved appreciably by 2001, and markedly by 2009. But let's face it, there is still a long way to go before national teams are regularly winning gold medals.

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05-11-2017, 01:42 PM
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Originally Posted by Yakushev72 View Post
But let's face it, there is still a long way to go before national teams are regularly winning gold medals.
True.

But it's a great sign that 75% of WHC roster is 25 or under.

And honestly, it probably should have been even more with Ozhiganov, Kaprizov, Nichushkin, etc.

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05-17-2017, 11:59 AM
  #12
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Originally Posted by MaxV View Post
True.

But it's a great sign that 75% of WHC roster is 25 or under.

And honestly, it probably should have been even more with Ozhiganov, Kaprizov, Nichushkin, etc.
Agreed. There seems to be a higher volume of good prospects in the last few years. For instance, Guryanov was really impressive in the WJC. Hopefully, that trend intensifies.

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05-18-2017, 02:15 AM
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Alessandro Seren Rosso
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yakushev72 View Post
Agreed. There seems to be a higher volume of good prospects in the last few years. For instance, Guryanov was really impressive in the WJC. Hopefully, that trend intensifies.
Unfortunately we may be losing it if all the guys now like in the latest couple of years hurry up to uncle sam as soon as they can just to get back after a pair of seasons regressed as players.

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05-18-2017, 06:19 PM
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Although I'm sure the collapse of Russia's economy and the administrative chaos that followed the collpase of the Soviet Union certainly contributed to the lack of hockey talent produced in the 1987-1990 born player generation, it seems all countries go through this sort of thing in a cyclical basis. Look at Canada and the horrific NHL drafts during the mid to late 1990s; the '95, '96, '99, and '00 drafts were all incredibly weak compared to those before and after. Even with Sweden there is a larege cap between the early 1970s born players like Sundin, Forsberg, Naslund, Alfredson that made up that country's golden age and today's early 1990s born stars, there was very little in the way of top talent to ease the transition between generations. At least Russia seems to have a ton of great young talent either entering their prime or on the way, even defensemen, a notorious weakness in the Russian system are emerging like Zadorov, Provorov, Sergachev, etc. So the future looks bright.

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05-20-2017, 03:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ForsbergForever View Post
Although I'm sure the collapse of Russia's economy and the administrative chaos that followed the collpase of the Soviet Union certainly contributed to the lack of hockey talent produced in the 1987-1990 born player generation, it seems all countries go through this sort of thing in a cyclical basis. Look at Canada and the horrific NHL drafts during the mid to late 1990s; the '95, '96, '99, and '00 drafts were all incredibly weak compared to those before and after. Even with Sweden there is a larege cap between the early 1970s born players like Sundin, Forsberg, Naslund, Alfredson that made up that country's golden age and today's early 1990s born stars, there was very little in the way of top talent to ease the transition between generations. At least Russia seems to have a ton of great young talent either entering their prime or on the way, even defensemen, a notorious weakness in the Russian system are emerging like Zadorov, Provorov, Sergachev, etc. So the future looks bright.
this case would be another interesting topic to discus why many countries had that lack of talent period during that 1987-1990!. like sweden that you mention!!.

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05-21-2017, 03:23 PM
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Alessandro Seren Rosso
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Originally Posted by Talisman View Post
this case would be another interesting topic to discus why many countries had that lack of talent period during that 1987-1990!. like sweden that you mention!!.
It may be the same effect. Russian/Soviet players were high quality and cheap. They did "steal" a lot of roster spots in other European leagues too.

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05-21-2017, 03:23 PM
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Alessandro Seren Rosso
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ForsbergForever View Post
Although I'm sure the collapse of Russia's economy and the administrative chaos that followed the collpase of the Soviet Union certainly contributed to the lack of hockey talent produced in the 1987-1990 born player generation, it seems all countries go through this sort of thing in a cyclical basis. Look at Canada and the horrific NHL drafts during the mid to late 1990s; the '95, '96, '99, and '00 drafts were all incredibly weak compared to those before and after. Even with Sweden there is a larege cap between the early 1970s born players like Sundin, Forsberg, Naslund, Alfredson that made up that country's golden age and today's early 1990s born stars, there was very little in the way of top talent to ease the transition between generations. At least Russia seems to have a ton of great young talent either entering their prime or on the way, even defensemen, a notorious weakness in the Russian system are emerging like Zadorov, Provorov, Sergachev, etc. So the future looks bright.
Zadorov - disappeared from the map. Provorov failed the WC. Let's hope in Sergachyov.

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05-21-2017, 06:07 PM
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Zadorov was a healthy scratch on an awful Colorado team. He's not looking good.

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05-22-2017, 04:16 AM
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Alessandro Seren Rosso
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Milos Krasic View Post
Zadorov was a healthy scratch on an awful Colorado team. He's not looking good.
To be completely honest, though, he has been rigged for injuries for his whole career.
But 95% he'll just add himself to the list of "why didn't you wait a little bit more, son?" players

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05-22-2017, 06:55 PM
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To be completely honest, though, he has been rigged for injuries for his whole career.
But 95% he'll just add himself to the list of "why didn't you wait a little bit more, son?" players
Just before his season-ending injury, Zadorov had cemented his place in Colorado's lineup and was bringing a very physical element to his game. I really hope he can continue this great development next year and finally stay healthy!

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