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Old
10-17-2011, 04:26 AM
  #1
Lowkey
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Canucks system

In various threads lately there has been a bit of talk about general x's and o's and a little detail about the system the Canucks play under Vigneault but nobody has went in to great detail. I know there is a lot of knowledgeable posters on this board and I'm hoping some of you can help me understand the finer points of what the team is trying to accomplish in all 3 zones. Thanks in advance!

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10-17-2011, 05:04 AM
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Rome = Chip puck off glass.

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10-17-2011, 07:29 AM
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Rome = Chip puck off glass.
in all 3 zones

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10-17-2011, 06:22 PM
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in all 3 zones

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10-17-2011, 06:41 PM
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Sedins just cycle cycle cycle until one gets open.

The system is all about pressure, speed and moving the puck out. I think other teams have done a great job of clogging up that outlet pass and forcing the Canucks to chip it deeper and sooner than they'd like.

One thing they do effectively is once the forecheck is established they get it to the point... the D is not shooting it like last year. They need to start wiring it and make the opposing team scared to block it.

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10-17-2011, 07:25 PM
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Canucks run a high 2 1 2 forecheck. 2 forecheckers at or below the blueline, with one forward sitting between the blue line and red line. We like to play our back 2 (defensemen) up at/above our blueline (with our middle man fading back to clog the center lane), forcing a chip in. So we see fewer goals on the rush. It is an effective defensive strategy for quite a few reasons.

***Edit*** Of course there are situational variations of this formation and strategy which our guys know very well. There are multiple situations and strategies, but they all primarily revolve around clogging up the neutral zone. But from there it varies. Sometimes we don't have 2 in their zone due to a shift, or turnover, or something of the like. IN which case we go for the clog, and pressure on the receiver of the first outlet pass/puck carrier, always cycling back to cover guys putting the pressure on the puck carrier. Whole point though is to force the chip. But ya man, there is a ton of variations and exceptions and situational plays. Would take forever to write out everything I've seen. Maybe someone else has the patience... I don't. ***End Edit***

It neutralizes the opposing teams speed. If they have to continually dump and chase, their young speed demons are taken out of their strong element (speed rush plays) and into what is likely their weaker element (forechecking along the boards). Given that board play is a big part of our game, and one of our greatest strengths, this aggressive forecheck combined with clogging up our blueline forcing a chip in creates the best possible scenario for us in that it plays to our strengths.

On offense we tend to be a puck possession team. Our offensive strategies vary from line to line, and are really situational. I don't wanna write a long paragraph about the cycle from the corner, or running up the D and cycling back to cover and the offensive strategies relative to the line/situation of the moment as I'm kind of lazy right now. But that is the jist of it.


Last edited by Nachoman AlfieSavage*: 10-17-2011 at 08:13 PM.
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10-17-2011, 07:39 PM
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10-17-2011, 08:01 PM
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Originally Posted by DonIsOnTheRoofAgain View Post
On offense we tend to be a puck possession team. Our offensive strategies vary from line to line, and are really situational. I don't wanna write a long paragraph about the cycle from the corner, or running up the D and cycling back to cover and the offensive strategies relative to the line/situation of the moment as I'm kind of lazy right now. But that is the jist of it.
A key part of the Canuck's puck possession game worth mentioning is that the defencemen avoid chipping the puck out, and instead look to make a breakout pass to a player with speed. Everyone (even Alberts and Rome) is at least average at that on the Canucks. The puck movers break up dump and chase game and turn it into offense.

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10-17-2011, 10:02 PM
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Originally Posted by DonIsOnTheRoofAgain View Post
Canucks run a high 2 1 2 forecheck. 2 forecheckers at or below the blueline, with one forward sitting between the blue line and red line. We like to play our back 2 (defensemen) up at/above our blueline (with our middle man fading back to clog the center lane), forcing a chip in. So we see fewer goals on the rush. It is an effective defensive strategy for quite a few reasons.

***Edit*** Of course there are situational variations of this formation and strategy which our guys know very well. There are multiple situations and strategies, but they all primarily revolve around clogging up the neutral zone. But from there it varies. Sometimes we don't have 2 in their zone due to a shift, or turnover, or something of the like. IN which case we go for the clog, and pressure on the receiver of the first outlet pass/puck carrier, always cycling back to cover guys putting the pressure on the puck carrier. Whole point though is to force the chip. But ya man, there is a ton of variations and exceptions and situational plays. Would take forever to write out everything I've seen. Maybe someone else has the patience... I don't. ***End Edit***

It neutralizes the opposing teams speed. If they have to continually dump and chase, their young speed demons are taken out of their strong element (speed rush plays) and into what is likely their weaker element (forechecking along the boards). Given that board play is a big part of our game, and one of our greatest strengths, this aggressive forecheck combined with clogging up our blueline forcing a chip in creates the best possible scenario for us in that it plays to our strengths.

On offense we tend to be a puck possession team. Our offensive strategies vary from line to line, and are really situational. I don't wanna write a long paragraph about the cycle from the corner, or running up the D and cycling back to cover and the offensive strategies relative to the line/situation of the moment as I'm kind of lazy right now. But that is the jist of it.
Well, I loved this and know more about the system. Great Thread with posts like this. Also, I'd be keen to read a "long paragraph about the cycle from the corner or runing up the D"

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10-17-2011, 10:29 PM
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rebel diamond
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Originally Posted by deckercky View Post
A key part of the Canuck's puck possession game worth mentioning is that the defencemen avoid chipping the puck out, and instead look to make a breakout pass to a player with speed. Everyone (even Alberts and Rome) is at least average at that on the Canucks. The puck movers break up dump and chase game and turn it into offense.
Yes, one hallmark of a system like this is lots of reverses behind their own net by the defensemen back to the weak side. It was noted towards the end of last season that this may be a cause of the general wear and tear on our d-men, as plays like this result in more hits then ringing/chipping out the strong side.

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10-17-2011, 10:47 PM
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If you ask Bieksa it's "shots, shots, shots... shots."

Seriously speaking it's worth mentioning forwards having to fall back if a D is pitching in.

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10-17-2011, 11:05 PM
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10-17-2011, 11:07 PM
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used to be defensive zone trap! but now its defense pushes the puck up. passes to forward play keepaway *sedins* cycle back and forth make plays.

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10-17-2011, 11:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DonIsOnTheRoofAgain View Post
Canucks run a high 2 1 2 forecheck. 2 forecheckers at or below the blueline, with one forward sitting between the blue line and red line. We like to play our back 2 (defensemen) up at/above our blueline (with our middle man fading back to clog the center lane), forcing a chip in. So we see fewer goals on the rush. It is an effective defensive strategy for quite a few reasons.

***Edit*** Of course there are situational variations of this formation and strategy which our guys know very well. There are multiple situations and strategies, but they all primarily revolve around clogging up the neutral zone. But from there it varies. Sometimes we don't have 2 in their zone due to a shift, or turnover, or something of the like. IN which case we go for the clog, and pressure on the receiver of the first outlet pass/puck carrier, always cycling back to cover guys putting the pressure on the puck carrier. Whole point though is to force the chip. But ya man, there is a ton of variations and exceptions and situational plays. Would take forever to write out everything I've seen. Maybe someone else has the patience... I don't. ***End Edit***

It neutralizes the opposing teams speed. If they have to continually dump and chase, their young speed demons are taken out of their strong element (speed rush plays) and into what is likely their weaker element (forechecking along the boards). Given that board play is a big part of our game, and one of our greatest strengths, this aggressive forecheck combined with clogging up our blueline forcing a chip in creates the best possible scenario for us in that it plays to our strengths.

On offense we tend to be a puck possession team. Our offensive strategies vary from line to line, and are really situational. I don't wanna write a long paragraph about the cycle from the corner, or running up the D and cycling back to cover and the offensive strategies relative to the line/situation of the moment as I'm kind of lazy right now. But that is the jist of it.
Great analysis. If you're feeling less 'lazy' at any point I would love to read more.

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10-18-2011, 12:10 AM
  #15
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Originally Posted by deckercky View Post
A key part of the Canuck's puck possession game worth mentioning is that the defencemen avoid chipping the puck out, and instead look to make a breakout pass to a player with speed. Everyone (even Alberts and Rome) is at least average at that on the Canucks. The puck movers break up dump and chase game and turn it into offense.
On the PP and with the Sedins at ES, Henrik often circles back behind the D-man carrying the puck who drops it to him letting him attack the blue line with speed. If the opposing D back off too much Henrik will carry the puck to the halfboards. If they do not back off then he will do a button hook just inside the blue line and either make short pass to Daniel (often a give and go) or a long cross ice pass if the winger (Burrows or Kesler is open) and then he breaks for the halfboards to set up the cycle.

In the defensive zone the D do much less man to man defending and do more "zone defence" backed up by the forwards which requires the D to make sure they are properly handing off their man to the next checker (Alberts noted this was the hardest thing for him to learn as he had played a man on man system in the Eastern Conference). The D has to be active and rotate through coverages but not get chasing their checks. Patience is critical and Salo and Hamhuis are masters at this sort of coverage. Bieksa and Ballard often become impatient and lose their positioning which is a problem.

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10-18-2011, 12:12 AM
  #16
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Originally Posted by rebel diamond View Post
Yes, one hallmark of a system like this is lots of reverses behind their own net by the defensemen back to the weak side. It was noted towards the end of last season that this may be a cause of the general wear and tear on our d-men, as plays like this result in more hits then ringing/chipping out the strong side.
And it is the D able to take the hit to make that play that often results in odd man rushes

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10-18-2011, 02:17 AM
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^ I believe the formal name for the type of forecheck we have in place is the left wing lock (2-1-2).

Anyone have any thoughts on the puck support in all 3 zones? Is it generally good, or is it lacking? I've always felt it could be better especially when breaking out of our own end, as our forwards tend to blow the zone as soon as one guy gets possession this way.

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10-18-2011, 03:48 AM
  #18
Bobby Orrhoff
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I would say that the when the team is focused and playing the system tight the puck support is superb. Forwards hang back to support the D's and you rarely see any hoper passes. Everything is nice and contained with quick short passes (especially the Sedins) which makes the rush pretty fluid though the neutral zone on the rush. When the team isn't firing on all cylinders the forwards tend to blow the zone which either leads to D's chipping it out or passes being picked off in the neutral zone. I'd say out of all of the forwards on the team Kesler is the one who provides the best puck support from D to forward on the breakouts.

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10-18-2011, 03:08 PM
  #19
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Originally Posted by Wetcoaster View Post
On the PP and with the Sedins at ES, Henrik often circles back behind the D-man carrying the puck who drops it to him letting him attack the blue line with speed. If the opposing D back off too much Henrik will carry the puck to the halfboards. If they do not back off then he will do a button hook just inside the blue line and either make short pass to Daniel (often a give and go) or a long cross ice pass if the winger (Burrows or Kesler is open) and then he breaks for the halfboards to set up the cycle.
That bumpback play on the PP really is an interesting little piece of zone entry strategy. At times it looks so predictable you almost wonder how it continues to work. But it reminds me of a 'triple option' play in football, and we have guys who execute it so effectively. It does a great job of exploiting that extra man on the PP, forcing defenders to commit to the different options, and one of them always ends up open. Having that point-man able to legitimately threaten to walk straight down the middle combined with the Twins ability to pull off quick give-n-gos in a ridiculously tight space, and Kesler's ability to blow past defenders really puts the PKers in a tough spot...and often there's not a whole lot they can do other than getting lucky. We also have d-men who are very effective at creating problems after they've bumped the puck back to Henrik/Kesler...either running a little bit of a pick, or drawing coverage away from the zone entry point.

Must be incredibly frustrating to gameplan against. And even more frustrating to be on the ice trying to decide what to take away. You take away the point-man walking right up the middle...you get Henrik coming with speed and options. You pressure Henrik hard...you get a 4-on-3 down low with a PKer caught in the neutral zone. You limit Henrik's straight entry...you get a series of quick give and goes with Daniel and the point-man. You clog up that point area and take away those give and goes...and you get a cross-ice feed to the wide-open winger or opposite side point man. etc. And then they come back the next entry with Kesler as the bumpback man and give it a completely different look.

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