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Is it true that goalies were scared of Al MacInnis's slap shot?

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Old
11-16-2011, 11:50 PM
  #1
Puckgenius*
 
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Is it true that goalies were scared of Al MacInnis's slap shot?

Big Al had a 120mph slapper, it would rip right through anything. I keep hearing a lot of goalies were scared to stop it when he would tee it up with the wooden stick. I could be wrong but I think it was Andy Moog who said it way back.

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11-17-2011, 12:00 AM
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lol, I don't think it was that fast. But it did look like it was going 120 mph. More like in the 100-105 mph range.

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11-17-2011, 12:03 AM
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Sadekuuro
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120 mph is more than a little dubious. But he definitely had a bomb that most everyone was afraid of. I recall him breaking Osgood's hand on a shot that iirc he caught cleanly in his trapper (and I don't think he was the first such goalie either).

He also famously destroyed Mike Liut's mask from like center ice.

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11-17-2011, 12:22 AM
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Killion
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Ya, his shot was just a killer, savage, heavy. Just ask his former team mate in St. Louis, Rich Parent. Suffered a ruptured testicle from one of Big Al's Slapper's in practice.

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11-17-2011, 12:41 AM
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begbeee
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I remember reading an interview with Patrick Roy where he says the most scary moment of his career was when he lost his helmet, was laying on the ice and saw how Al MacInnis is releasing his shot...

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11-17-2011, 05:17 AM
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Warfunkel
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Macinnis' slapshots have broken Mike Liut's mask, the boards behind the net and Jocelyn Thibault's finger.

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11-17-2011, 11:28 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by begbeee View Post
I remember reading an interview with Patrick Roy where he says the most scary moment of his career was when he lost his helmet, was laying on the ice and saw how Al MacInnis is releasing his shot...
**** that. I quit.

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11-17-2011, 01:32 PM
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Ouch, so goalies were most definitely scared of his slapper!

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11-17-2011, 01:37 PM
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Doctor No
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Warfunkel View Post
Macinnis' slapshots have broken Mike Liut's mask, the boards behind the net and Jocelyn Thibault's finger.
And Rich Parent's scrotum.

But his slapshot wasn't 120mph, and I can't imagine that professional athletes were "scared" of his slapshot (in the same sense that you or I use the word "scared"). They were surely aware of his slapshot.

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11-17-2011, 01:49 PM
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Drake1588
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His slapshot wasn't 120 mph, and it didn't rip through anything... but as for the rest, yup.

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11-17-2011, 01:53 PM
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vadim sharifijanov
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read a piece on macinnis once (this was 20 years ago, probably in beckett) where grant fuhr said, "as a goalie you're not supposed to be scared of anything. the only thing i'm scared of is al macinnis' slap shot."

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11-17-2011, 02:27 PM
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markrander87
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Goalies relative to the time were more afraid of Charlie Conachers slapshot.

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11-17-2011, 03:18 PM
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tarheelhockey
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Drake1588 View Post
His slapshot wasn't 120 mph, and it didn't rip through anything...
Through Thibeau's hand.



Through the boards.


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11-17-2011, 04:33 PM
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The best shot ever. Hard, accurate and scary. I don't think players feared it in the sense of being hurt by it, but they certainly feared the chances of it ending in the back of the net.

No one since has had a shot like Al.

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11-17-2011, 04:34 PM
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Big Phil
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Doctor No View Post
And Rich Parent's scrotum.

But his slapshot wasn't 120mph, and I can't imagine that professional athletes were "scared" of his slapshot (in the same sense that you or I use the word "scared"). They were surely aware of his slapshot.
Wanna bet? Professional hockey players certainly were afraid of his wind up. You could be getting paid $10 million a year and you were afraid of Al MacInnis' shot. It wasn't that it was just hard, but it was insanely accurate. Al Iafrate shot all over the place. Not MacInnis. It was always hard, often low, on the net and impossible to control. If you blocked a shot it would hit you and the players knew this. So yeah the players were subconciously afraid of MacInnis' shot. Especially the goalies.

By the way, to the OP, I think you might be confusing MacInnis' shot with Bobby Hull's when you talk about 120mph. Apparently in 1965 Sports Illustrated recorded Hull's shot at 120mph. MacInnis usually hit around the 100mph mark, similar to Chara's today. The difference is that MacInnis had a quicker windup, more accurate shot and could utilize the shot within the game much better and often.

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11-17-2011, 04:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by habsjunkie2 View Post
The best shot ever. Hard, accurate and scary. I don't think players feared it in the sense of being hurt by it, but they certainly feared the chances of it ending in the back of the net.

No one since has had a shot like Al.
I think Bobby Hull's was better.

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11-17-2011, 04:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Big Phil View Post
Wanna bet?
If you can come up with a way to objectively prove it one way or the other, sure.

You can't really rely on player statements either way, since it could either be paying MacInnis a compliment, or showing false bravado. Especially since your argument appears to be that they were "subconsciously" afraid.

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11-17-2011, 04:56 PM
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BobbyAwe
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Killion View Post
Ya, his shot was just a killer, savage, heavy. Just ask his former team mate in St. Louis, Rich Parent. Suffered a ruptured testicle from one of Big Al's Slapper's in practice.
I just felt that

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11-17-2011, 05:05 PM
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kdb209
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Killion View Post
Ya, his shot was just a killer, savage, heavy. Just ask his former team mate in St. Louis, Rich Parent. Suffered a ruptured testicle from one of Big Al's Slapper's in practice.
Which reminds me of a Steve Shields quote - upon arriving in San Jose after backing up the Dominator in Buffalo - paraphrasing:

Drew: You must have learned a lot playing behind Hasek.
Shields: Yeah.
Drew: Did he learn anything from you?
Shields: Yeah. Wear two cups.

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11-18-2011, 10:45 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Killion View Post
Ya, his shot was just a killer, savage, heavy.
That's a big factor. You would think a 3-oz. rubber puck would always feel the same if travelling at the same speed... but it doesn't. I recall from my goaltending days that some shooters had a fast shot, and others had an equally fast shot that also came in HEAVY. It may have to do with the spin on the puck, but you would almost get knocked backwards.

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11-18-2011, 02:03 PM
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Both Gump Worsley and Gerry Cheevers, having no one in front of them and seeing Bobby Hull winding up for his slap shot, admitted to skating out of the net and leaving it wide open for his slap shot. Hull's slap shot was very heavy.

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11-18-2011, 03:28 PM
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Big Phil
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Doctor No View Post
If you can come up with a way to objectively prove it one way or the other, sure.

You can't really rely on player statements either way, since it could either be paying MacInnis a compliment, or showing false bravado. Especially since your argument appears to be that they were "subconsciously" afraid.
Why not? If a player says they were scared of MacInnis' wind up why shouldn't we believe them? It isn't as if blocking the shot wouldn't hurt you. Professional or not you are still human

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11-18-2011, 03:34 PM
  #23
Killion
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BobbyAwe View Post
I just felt that
No kidding. Its' pretty hard not to wind up with an uncontrollable case of the giggles over a "ruptured testicle", especially when you further consider that guys like McInnis could pretty much thread a needle with their slapshot.... I sure hope that one was the result of a deflection huh?

Quote:
Originally Posted by SealsFan View Post
That's a big factor. You would think a 3-oz. rubber puck would always feel the same if travelling at the same speed... but it doesn't. I recall from my goaltending days that some shooters had a fast shot, and others had an equally fast shot that also came in HEAVY. It may have to do with the spin on the puck, but you would almost get knocked backwards.
Ya, I too experienced a lot of that having grown up playing goal during Hulls' haydays with everyone from Atom on up trying to emulate the Golden Jet, often with hilarious & or horrible results. From Bantam on you often just caught a glimpse of the puck as it left the shooters blade, the puck in flight invisible. Spin would cause it to defy the laws of physics, dipping or rising, arc'ing left or right. The lower the lie of the shooters stick combined with a more moderate curvature, along with the guys size, the "heavier" the shot. You could stop it, you had to, but you knew it was gonna hurt.

I remember the first time I really faced that in Bantam playing in Toronto with Mark Napier screaming down on a breakaway. SOB winds up from just inside the blue line & fell for the old open trapper "I dare ya to beat me glove side" trick, leaving him nothing else to shoot at because I was about 10' outside of the crease realizing he had no intention of a deke or even a wrister. Anyway, he fell for it & put the puck right into my catcher, pure luck & his accuracy, which wound up flying about 60' up & over the glass behind the net & into the steel girders on the ceiling, the puck falling out & landing back on the ice in-play. I never even saw the shot after it'd left his stick, my hand numb for about a week thereafter.

I dont think "fear" ever played a role in facing heavy shooters, big guns, provided you had a clear view and they had an open lane. It was the idiots that would wind-up within 3-10' of the crease that you worried about a bit more. I mean, WTF?!. A wrist shot would suffice in-closer or try a deke. A slapshot at that range is just Homicidal, because either your going to kill someone or your going to get killed for trying it on.


Last edited by Killion: 11-18-2011 at 03:51 PM.
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Old
11-18-2011, 07:16 PM
  #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Big Phil View Post
The difference is that MacInnis had a quicker windup, more accurate shot and could utilize the shot within the game much better and often.
That's the key. The whole mp/h discussion is an irrelevant here. Many players can shoot with impressive speeds in all star contest or in similar condition, but MacInnis could constantly blast a scary slapper in the game situation.

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11-18-2011, 07:54 PM
  #25
Hanji
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Big Phil View Post
Wanna bet? Professional hockey players certainly were afraid of his wind up. You could be getting paid $10 million a year and you were afraid of Al MacInnis' shot. It wasn't that it was just hard, but it was insanely accurate. Al Iafrate shot all over the place. Not MacInnis. It was always hard, often low, on the net and impossible to control. If you blocked a shot it would hit you and the players knew this. So yeah the players were subconciously afraid of MacInnis' shot. Especially the goalies.

By the way, to the OP, I think you might be confusing MacInnis' shot with Bobby Hull's when you talk about 120mph. Apparently in 1965 Sports Illustrated recorded Hull's shot at 120mph. MacInnis usually hit around the 100mph mark, similar to Chara's today. The difference is that MacInnis had a quicker windup, more accurate shot and could utilize the shot within the game much better and often.

See, this is a prime example of a player's 'legend' eclipsing the truth.
Realistically nobody in history has shot a puck 120mph; at least not by the methods shots are measured today.


From 1965 Sports Illustrated
At 95 mph Hull's slap shot is the fastest in the league.

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/vau...6832/index.htm

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