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Ringer question

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Old
11-20-2011, 10:56 PM
  #1
Ducksgo*
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Ringer question

Played a rookie game when I can play the next level, wondering how you guys manage the competitiveness in a level below you but still keep your posture so you don't get kicked out?

I usually set people up but theres a few Players in the league who can skate and play with me so how do you balance the two?

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11-21-2011, 05:50 AM
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Noir
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If you're one of the better players, reading people shouldn't be a problem. You should be able to spot which players are the weak, mediocre, or better ones and play according to their skill level.

That's all.


If you want to be sportsmanlike, just give weaker players more room and cheat defensively against the better players.

If we're talking offense, you can either: play set-up man, or just watch your goals and make sure you're not "over-padding" your team's lead.

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Old
11-21-2011, 10:42 AM
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CornKicker
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i have had this in the past and my goal is to try to get the guys who never score a goal, i will tell the guy who struggles positionally to get open on teh far post and be ready for a pass, then i will use my skating to draw the defenders to me, as so as they do i slide it over to them for an easy goal.

In my experience people love when teh ringer comes out, but it depends on the guy. if you are "pick up the puck and try to go end to end" guy every time then no one likes you. But if you are creating plays and working with the other teammates they love that. The other team hates it but that works to your advantage as they will try to stop you creating more ice for your linemates.

The general rule is if you arent a dooshbag then pass to your teammates, make plays with them, work hard defensivley and if the game is close in teh 3rd or you are losing pot a couple to get the win. the guys respect another guy who plays a team game, and love that he isnt all about himself.

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11-21-2011, 10:55 AM
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Stickmata
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Backcheck hard, play defensively, keep the other team off the board and let the other guys on your team try to win the game. When I happen to be one of the better players on the ice, the first thing I focus on is making sure their better players don't score.

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11-21-2011, 11:58 AM
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Wilch
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Play as a D. Defensively, just play sound positional defense. Offensively, try not to go end to end. Set up guys from the point, try to feed your forwards with some breakout passes.

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11-21-2011, 02:57 PM
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opivy
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Or let the people who need the ice to get the ice.

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11-22-2011, 07:16 AM
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Skraut
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Assuming you're a forward, switch and play D. Not only will you learn something new, you can see quite a bit from the points, and help the team out, setting guys up from there.

It's a lot more fun for a team when everybody is scoring, not just one guy on the team. And if you can use your skills on the back end, you can keep the play in the offensive zone, reduce the pressure on your own goalie, and help everybody enjoy the game more.


Last edited by Skraut: 11-22-2011 at 07:27 AM.
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Old
11-22-2011, 12:55 PM
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newfr4u
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as someone whose team faces ringers all the time, i have to say, it's the lowest of the low when some hotshot is playing defense all day. then realizes they are down 2 in the third period, puts his wheels on, dekes around the entire team and scores three unassisted goals.

if you are a ringer, help your teammates develop as players, don't just do the work for them.

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11-23-2011, 11:47 PM
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SoundwaveIsCharisma
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I've played the ringer role a few times, usually what I do is take over the defensive responsibilities so that the rest of my team can go try things offensively. I'll very rarely use my offensive abilities, but when I do I'll only do it if my teammates are in a position where they can help themselves. Basically I'll only pass, and when I do pass it's because a teammate is getting open. If the team is behind I won't go all out to score for them, since I think it's a better learning oppurtunity for the guys on the team to lose because they couldn't get things going rather than win because I went all out. Some of the guys on the team hate this, but they're the type that only likes winning, other guys love it because it lets them test out their own abilities and puts them in pressure situations.

Of course if the other team is full of jerks I don't mind completely shutting them down and embarassing them every now and again.

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11-24-2011, 09:58 AM
  #10
goalie29
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Due to a shortage of goalies, I'm playing goalie in a women's beginner league. Last year the league was almost ruined by too many higher level players being idiots. Luckily this year we've mostly either gotten rid of them, or taught the couple left how to not be twits.

Here's what I see:

Good players who are fun:
* They go with the intention to help everyone else.
* Sit back and quarterback
* If they shoot, it's a wrist shot to generate rebounds instead of charging the net and blasting.
* Play mentor and teach their team a thing or two on the bench, if it seems welcome.
* Cheer the beginner making a decent play.
* Score if the puck happens to go in.


Good players who wreck the game for everyone:
*See the ice time as a chance for them to dominate
*Swoop all over the ice and grab every loose puck they can, including pucks that two newbies are battling over
*Carry the puck end to end constantly and only then let their teammates have the puck.
*On the bench they say stuff like "This is fun! I've never
got to have the puck so much!" and brag about their sweet moves.
*They score at will on the beginner goalies who can hardly move.

*And my personal favourite (being a goalie) - once they've treated everyone else on the ice like practice pylons and beat the non-existent defence and had 10 minutes to deke around me, they celebrate a goal like they just won game 7.

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Old
11-24-2011, 01:19 PM
  #11
frito
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goalie29 View Post
Due to a shortage of goalies, I'm playing goalie in a women's beginner league. Last year the league was almost ruined by too many higher level players being idiots. Luckily this year we've mostly either gotten rid of them, or taught the couple left how to not be twits.

Here's what I see:

Good players who are fun:
* They go with the intention to help everyone else.
* Sit back and quarterback
* If they shoot, it's a wrist shot to generate rebounds instead of charging the net and blasting.
* Play mentor and teach their team a thing or two on the bench, if it seems welcome.
* Cheer the beginner making a decent play.
* Score if the puck happens to go in.


Good players who wreck the game for everyone:
*See the ice time as a chance for them to dominate
*Swoop all over the ice and grab every loose puck they can, including pucks that two newbies are battling over
*Carry the puck end to end constantly and only then let their teammates have the puck.
*On the bench they say stuff like "This is fun! I've never
got to have the puck so much!" and brag about their sweet moves.
*They score at will on the beginner goalies who can hardly move.

*And my personal favourite (being a goalie) - once they've treated everyone else on the ice like practice pylons and beat the non-existent defence and had 10 minutes to deke around me, they celebrate a goal like they just won game 7.
This is a great summary. I play in a D5 league (our divisions go from D2 down to lower D5). Every team has a ringer or two. One particular D5 team has a guy who could play D2 and he is great to play against. He tries to set up his teammates but will score to keep the game close. This particular team is very weak to the extent I told him to tell his teammates to attack - that I would give them a lane. He appreciated that. He will step it up a bit against our more skilled guys and back off against our lesser skilled guys. He is always smiling even if his team isn't winning.

On the other hand there is a team of pukes in our league. This team had probably 1/2 dozen early 20 year old guys who could play D3 or D2. They completely ran up the score against us, hooting and hollering after each goal even when it got to 9-2. I was on D when they scored their 9th goal with said puke doing yet another fly by against us. I, immaturely I admit, went to the bench and said "I don't care about the puck anymore". Next shift out said puke was doing another fly by and I determined he wasn't going to get to my goalie. Well, we met head on at full speed in front of the net and I ended up with whiplash and an elbow or something to my throat. That was October and I haven't played since. To top it off, they got a power play a couple minutes later and went to far as to pull their goalie. Needless to say, a fight almost broke out after the game.

So, there is nothing wrong with ringers depending on how they are used. If a ringer plays like the first example all is good and everybody has a great time. If they play like the second example all they are proving is that they are cowards who are too afraid to play at the proper skill level.

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