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skating ability time?

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12-02-2011, 05:48 PM
  #1
ausername1
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skating ability time?

Hi all,
I just started hockey a few months ago (hockey is something that I've loved since I was little but I never had the chance to play until now, I'm 18) and really want to get better at skating. I go to practice a lot during public sessions and sort of get discouraged by how I do compared to others. I know skating is hard and takes tons of practice but I sort of feel like maybe I'll never be able to do what I see others doing with ease/seemingly no effort since I didn't start at a young age like everyone else, lol.
I'm wondering how long it took you to get at a proficient level of skating, i.e., forwards/backwards crossovers, hockey stopping, pivoting, etc. without falling 90% of the time. Is it something you think I will ever be able to do it as naturally as others or if it will take me longer to do?

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12-02-2011, 06:04 PM
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hyster110
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ausername1 View Post
Hi all,
I just started hockey a few months ago (hockey is something that I've loved since I was little but I never had the chance to play until now, I'm 18) and really want to get better at skating. I go to practice a lot during public sessions and sort of get discouraged by how I do compared to others. I know skating is hard and takes tons of practice but I sort of feel like maybe I'll never be able to do what I see others doing with ease/seemingly no effort since I didn't start at a young age like everyone else, lol.
I'm wondering how long it took you to get at a proficient level of skating, i.e., forwards/backwards crossovers, hockey stopping, pivoting, etc. without falling 90% of the time. Is it something you think I will ever be able to do it as naturally as others or if it will take me longer to do?
man getting down on yourself if not going to help you. you have only been at it a few months even people who grew up playing hockey it takes them tons of time to get skating down

i have been skating for almost 5 years and i still have trouble with some aspects of skating, best thing is not to compare yourself to others. watch them, see what they are doing, hell ask them for tips. its going to be a long road man, just keep working at it and you will see results

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12-02-2011, 06:42 PM
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beth
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The more you practice, the faster you'll get better. Just pay attention to all your small successes. It's like learning how to walk all over again, but it will come. It's taken me over a year of skating at least twice a week, but I've gotten pretty good now. Lessons will help a TON if you can splurge on them, they can get you doing the right things with your edges from the get-go. Have fun and keep at it!

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12-02-2011, 07:20 PM
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JustGivingEr
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I may not be the best to give advice since I've been skating all my life but really I say to just get out and try to skate as much as you can. Take lessons/public skate etc. but the more you get on the ice the better you'll get. Don't get discouraged if you see others skating well, chances are they've been skating all their lives. Just keep practicing and you'll be better in no time.

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12-02-2011, 08:57 PM
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CptKirk
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Get somebody to teach you. Simply practicing isn't enough if you have no idea what you're supposed to be doing and exactly what you're doing wrong.

After that, how good you get depends on how much you practice and how easily you learn. With enough time, you should be able to become pretty good at it. But don't expect it to just naturally follow from just showing up at public skates, because it won't. In order to become that natural, you're gonna need instruction at some point of the way. And it's best to do that early before you have bad habits.

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12-02-2011, 10:00 PM
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emgsa85
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There's no replacement for practice and ice time. I played and skated a bit when I was around 8-10 years old then got out of playing due to family financial situations. I just started playing again last year (at the time I was 24) and I had problems getting my skates back underneath me as well. I was skating around 3 times a week for a few months before I started doing stick and puck sessions and an adult learn to play. Let me tell ya from first hand experience.... I was a lot more willing to "skate harder" with pads on because I wasn't afraid to fall on the ice as much. So once you get comfortable strap some pads on and go all out man!! Good luck and stay cool

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12-03-2011, 12:30 AM
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SouthpawTRK
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It's a long road to becoming proficient at a lot of things in life; and hockey is definitely one of them. Going to public skate sessions, stick and puck and taking lessons are great ways to get better. If you have the money, invest in some skating lessons (either a beginner hockey class or a figure skating class). Just try to get into a consistent frequency of going skating and stay positive; it will all come in time. You might also want to go to public sessions wearing your full gear; it may give you more confidence and not hurt as much when you take a fall.

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12-03-2011, 01:01 AM
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Stickmata
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Before you spend hours practicing, get some instruction to make sure you are skating properly. Proper body position, proper strides and proper use of your edges. If you don't know how to do it right, you're just reinforcing bad habits and wasting your time. Get some lessons, including some of the basic edge and slide drills and do them. Then you will get better.

Most new skaters stand up too straight and don't bend into a proper power skating position, which makes it harder to balance, which in turn makes it harder to do everything on the ice. I harp on this with the kids I coach.

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12-03-2011, 06:35 AM
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Gino 14
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Practice any time you can, and try to make up some sort of routine before you go out so you aren't just doing the same thing over and over. Make sure you work both sides at least equally if not more so on your weak side. Get some books that have conditioning drills and use them, both for skating and stopping/starting. I started skating a lot later in life than you and have been at it for over 10 years and I still try to skate at open skate at least 2-3 times a week at our local outdoor rink using those methods.

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12-03-2011, 08:39 AM
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Wilch
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Don't get down on yourself. I was in the same position a little under 3 months ago and I'm a completely different skater now. Get out there, be patient, don't worry about how others see you and skate. If they laugh at you let them, they're probably not great skaters, and they'll be eating the snow you scrap up on your stops in no time if you keep practicing.

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12-04-2011, 10:39 AM
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ausername1
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Thanks for all the insight! I will definitely look into getting some lessons when I get the money. I guess I just needed some reassurance that I wasn't doomed from the start for starting so late, lol. Thanks again!

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12-04-2011, 03:47 PM
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being able to watch yourself is hugely important, as well as having someone who can skate profficiently help identify flaws...

For me, staying low, keeping legs wide, recovery to glide, and heel extentions were things I worked on

Watching backwards crossovers on tape or in a mirror (lucky I can get public skate time @ a figure skating rink) really helps

do balance drills, work on outside/inside edge drills and work on transition drills

but keeping low, wide, remebering that you push outwards and not backwards... staying more on the forefront of your foot, is probably the best advice I Can think of

by low... I mean knee's bent whenever you're in the play
oh & keep skating when you get the puck... too many newb's manage to recieve the puck, but don't keep their feet moving, just coast... you need to keep accelerating and even with a puck you can skate about just as fast as you can without.
Its not soccer, and its easier to beat someone with pace than trying to make some dangle move slowly


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12-04-2011, 05:15 PM
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Also, depending on your physical conditions, you can improve your balance and agility faster than your skating technique, which will take more time. There are skaters in my league who are rather poor technique wise, but they make up for it with core strength, being lighter on skates (than some bigger guys if you know what I mean) and good power in the legs.

Otherwise, many have found it hard to use the proper knee bend and power skating technique without having a good core and so on, you may end up hurting your back among other things. Just something to keep in mind.

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12-04-2011, 05:19 PM
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shawn1331
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I've been skating since I was about 5 or 6. I started hockey when I was 9 (I'm 16 now) and I couldn't skate backwards/crossover or hockey stop for the 1st full year. The next season rolled around and I was easily one of the best backwards skaters on my team when I couldn't at all the frist season. Then crossovers came to me, going left was hella easier til I was about 14. I will always be weaker going right I assume because I don't have my stick to lean on or something. Then just last season I really perfected backwards crossovers both ways, I was good at them one way and relatively weak the other way I just don't remember which way. This year I've really taken on speed and can kick the afterburners on to break away from some of the fastest players in our league with ease.

Moral of the story is don't be scared to try, no one will laugh at your if you trip doing a backwards crossover. Hell, theres quite a few players in my league who have trouble with things like backwards crossovers and pivots but still play at a high level of hockey. You will always need to improve and be a better skater and practice is the only thing that will change that. Get out as often as you can and go public skating alot. Get out on the ponds and go to sunday morning shinny whenever possible. If your really having trouble go to a powerskating clinic and that should help, they'll show you the best posture for the most power in your strides and so on.

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12-05-2011, 03:59 PM
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SydNap
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Laura Stamm's Powerskating. It can make below average players good in about 1 season of hard work...

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12-06-2011, 01:52 PM
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kr580
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ausername1 View Post
I sort of feel like maybe I'll never be able to do what I see others doing with ease/seemingly no effort since I didn't start at a young age like everyone else, lol.
It looks like you've gotten the reassurance already but I'll say this: You said it yourself, they started when they were young. They've had their whole lives to practice their skating. Don't compare yourself to anyone else. Give yourself some more time. It comes slowly at first but once you start picking stuff up your skill will improve a lot faster. Nobody is going to be good in the first few months of picking up a completely new skill, especially one as difficult as skating. Keep at it.

I started skating last year at age 21 and now I'm one of the best skaters in the Bronze league at my rink. I had been to maybe 2 birthday skates in my life prior to jumping into hockey skating so I didn't have any head start. I went to public skate 4-5 times a week for months (yay no job) and I improved faster than anyone had ever seen. Put your mind to it and it's not that hard to get there.


Last edited by kr580: 12-06-2011 at 01:57 PM.
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Old
12-06-2011, 04:42 PM
  #17
Badger36
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It takes as long as it takes. There is no set timeframe for getting better at skating because everyone has different talent and ability levels.
The best thing you can do is to take skating lessons and then work on what they teach you as much as you can during your free time.

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