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Old
09-13-2014, 10:57 PM
  #1
Hectic
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Need some advice

Well I am kinda a beginner in hockey. I have only went to the rink a couple times and i want to start practicing lots this winter at odrs cause im looking to join house league next year. Im 16 years old, i weigh 150lbs and im about 5"8. I would like to know how long you would think it would get me to start playing smoothly to the same level as others in that league. Also i broke my stick and im looking to get a new one. I cant even lift the puck right now so i feel as though i have very weak forearms, what stick would you guys reccomend? Thanks for the help!

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09-14-2014, 12:22 AM
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mattkaminski15
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Originally Posted by Hectic View Post
Well I am kinda a beginner in hockey. I have only went to the rink a couple and i w ant to start practicing lots this winter at odrs cause im looking to join house league next year. Im 16 years old, i weigh 150lbs and im about 5"8. I would like to know how long you would think it would get me to start playing smoothly to the same level as others in that league. Also i broke my stick and im looking to get a new one. I cant even lift the puck right now so i feel as though i have very weak forearms, what stick would you guys reccomend? Thanks for the help!
Work on skating before anything else. Master your skating stride. Then add pucks. Use the flattest curve you can find to learn to shoot. The flatter the better.

Some people would say usea bigger curve but then you don't learn to shoot the proper way. Roll the puck from heel to toe.

Squats and wall sits for leg strength to get a good knee bend.

Good luck.

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09-14-2014, 12:23 AM
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Onetimersniper28
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We're more or less in the same boat, but I'm more advanced. I'm 18 years old, 6 ft tall, 150 lbs, and I play junior hockey. I have strong arms because I would take hundreds of shots per day from age 14 to today. Doing this, and working out regularly will ensure you have a hard shot and a strong core in the upper body.

I can't tell how long it will take for you to reach the other player's level, but your first priority is to become a good skater to be able to follow the play. Then, move on to the puck skills.

As for the stick, find something in the brand of your choice, preferably with a whippy flex (uncut intermediate stick), with a rather open blade like the P92.

Hope it helps. Good luck, and enjoy the game.

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09-14-2014, 12:34 AM
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Originally Posted by mattkaminski15 View Post
Work on skating before anything else. Master your skating stride. Then add pucks. Use the flattest curve you can find to learn to shoot. The flatter the better.

Some people would say usea bigger curve but then you don't learn to shoot the proper way. Roll the puck from heel to toe.

Squats and wall sits for leg strength to get a good knee bend.

Good luck.
I respectfully disagree with the bolded. Using a flat curve to begin with hurts your game more than anything. It makes it difficult to shoot, or to clear the puck by the boards. Also, you end up skying shots once you start using regular curves.

Shooting from heel to toe isn't a set rule, too. Shooting off the toe is a bit too advanced though.

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09-14-2014, 12:40 AM
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Hectic
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Originally Posted by Onetimersniper28 View Post
I respectfully disagree with the bolded. Using a flat curve to begin with hurts your game more than anything. It makes it difficult to shoot, or to clear the puck by the boards. Also, you end up skying shots once you start using regular curves.

Shooting from heel to toe isn't a set rule, too. Shooting off the toe is a bit too advanced though.
I am always looking to improve my game.. I do agree skating is the number one priority, bad part is i must wait till winter to start skating again :/ now the stick issue, im confused about because i would think a bigger curve would help me lift the puck easier.. Now slap shot wise i cant see myself shoot many of those..

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09-14-2014, 08:19 AM
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Well in my experience, which is very limited, I would say use a curve that's more of a middle ground. Something that's not too straight but not too curved. Maybe a mid curve with an open face. The reason I say this is because when I got back into hockey, I bought a second hand stick that was in a Parise curve (heel curve with a very open face) now while it was very easy to lift the puck with, it also Hurt me a lot skill wise because I became too reliant on the curve to do all the work for me. So a couple of weeks ago when that stick broke during a game my shot effectively became useless. I never learned how to properly roll my wrists/position the puck on the blade correctly etc.

Now I'm finding that I'm having to relearn how to shoot after two seasons back. I wish I would've learned to shoot properly from the beginning and not formed all these bad habits. If I had my shot would be coming along nicely right now instead of sucking. All I'm saying is that I would steer away from one extreme to the other in terms of curves, find something in the middle and learn to shoot properly with that. Then once you've become more skilled you can try a toe curve or heel type curve and it wont be such a huge adjustment.

Just my two cents.

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09-14-2014, 08:29 AM
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Originally Posted by Hectic View Post
i would think a bigger curve would help me lift the puck easier..
As far as being able to easily lift the puck, that has to do with the face of the blade being open or closed, not the curve. The curve would effect accuracy more then anything. Depending on where the curve starts (heel/middle/toe) it kind of traps the puck in that area. A heel curve is usually a much flatter curve, meaning its easier to roll the puck from the heel of the blade to the toe. A mid curve means the blade begins to curve in the middle of the blade. The toe curve does just that, curves at the toe. There are many variations to all of these but that's basically how it works.

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09-14-2014, 08:58 AM
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Originally Posted by WickedWinger View Post
As far as being able to easily lift the puck, that has to do with the face of the blade being open or closed, not the curve. The curve would effect accuracy more then anything. Depending on where the curve starts (heel/middle/toe) it kind of traps the puck in that area. A heel curve is usually a much flatter curve, meaning its easier to roll the puck from the heel of the blade to the toe. A mid curve means the blade begins to curve in the middle of the blade. The toe curve does just that, curves at the toe. There are many variations to all of these but that's basically how it works.
What stick would you reccomend for someone whos wrist shot is so low that its recognized as a pass?

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09-14-2014, 09:29 AM
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Originally Posted by Hectic View Post
What stick would you reccomend for someone whos wrist shot is so low that its recognized as a pass?
I personally use a p92 backstrom (bauer) its open enough to lift the puck with a little technique, but not so open that you will have trouble keeping the puck low if necessary. The curve is a nice middle ground imo. So once you get used to it you'll eventually be able to take some decent backhanders also. Now I do want to stress that practice is everything. A well rounded shooter can snipe with almost any curve. There are other curves out there but thats just the one that seems to work best for me at the moment and since you're still new and trying to find your way I would recommend giving it a try.

Oh and try not to beat yourself up too much about having a weak shot right now. We all started some where, so just keep practicing and it will pay off.

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09-14-2014, 09:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hectic View Post
What stick would you reccomend for someone whos wrist shot is so low that its recognized as a pass?
It is not the stick. (unless it is too short, too long, or too much curve)

Shooting is a rocking motion weight transfer. Pull puck back with most of your weight on back leg, then follow through with weight transfered to the front leg.

If you follow through high the puck should go high.

Now practice this a few hundred times a day.

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09-14-2014, 11:26 AM
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mattkaminski15
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Originally Posted by Onetimersniper28 View Post
I respectfully disagree with the bolded. Using a flat curve to begin with hurts your game more than anything. It makes it difficult to shoot, or to clear the puck be boards. Also, you end up skying shots once you start using regular curves.

Shooting from heel to toe isn't a set rule, too. Shooting off the toe is a bit too advanced though.
You dont want to have something very open. Then you rely on the curve to shoot for you and your technique is fflawed. You may not want something as flat as you can get, but players like eddie olcyzk, Sidney crosby, and i believe wayne gretzky as well, all used, and still use, curves that were almost straight and were flatter than all hell. It doesnt hurt you. It will just be harder because youre not used to not having the big face to raise your shot.

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09-14-2014, 11:50 AM
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You'll never be able to shoot unless you learn to skate first. Doesn't matter how expensive your stick is. If you don't have a strong balance on your skates it will affect your shot tremendously. It's not in your arms either, the shot is a total body motion, you create torque with your core and legs, arms are for that snap and control. Get stronger skating and work on total body strength, specifically core and balance. Look at the work outs a lot pros do, it involves core exercises and balance balls.

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09-14-2014, 02:58 PM
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Hectic
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Would a whippier flex give me more power?

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09-14-2014, 08:48 PM
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Originally Posted by mattkaminski15 View Post
You dont want to have something very open. Then you rely on the curve to shoot for you and your technique is fflawed. You may not want something as flat as you can get, but players like eddie olcyzk, Sidney crosby, and i believe wayne gretzky as well, all used, and still use, curves that were almost straight and were flatter than all hell. It doesnt hurt you. It will just be harder because youre not used to not having the big face to raise your shot.
I never said a beginner should start with a very open curve. I just said that a flat blade will make the process of learning the game more difficult.

I started with an open curve (P92), and I have a pretty good shot.

Sidney Crosby, Wayne Gretzky and Eddie Olczyk are exceptions. They could play with Chara's stick and still be dominant. These players are the best among the elite, not beginners.

By the way, Crosby's curve has evolved ever since he made it to the NHL. It's a bit deeper now. It looks like a PM9.

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09-14-2014, 10:32 PM
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mattkaminski15
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Originally Posted by Onetimersniper28 View Post
I never said a beginner should start with a very open curve. I just said that a flat blade will make the process of learning the game more difficult.

I started with an open curve (P92), and I have a pretty good shot.

Sidney Crosby, Wayne Gretzky and Eddie Olczyk are exceptions. They could play with Chara's stick and still be dominant. These players are the best among the elite, not beginners.

By the way, Crosby's curve has evolved ever since he made it to the NHL. It's a bit deeper now. It looks like a PM9.
A flat blade won't be detrimental. Most adm classes teach kids to shoot with flat blades to get their technique down. I should know, i help coach an adm class.

If a young kids can do it and its how they're taught why is it bad.

Hell it's how i was taught to shoot.

The greats all started as kids using flat blades, they learned that way and so did a lot of kids.

Let's agree to disagree.

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09-14-2014, 11:45 PM
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OK look, you both have good points regarding curves. There are really two schools of thought on this matter. Meeting in the middle (like with a P88 mid curve) is what I tend to recommend.

Your points have been made, let readers decide on which to follow.

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09-15-2014, 06:34 AM
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Hectic
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I'd like to know wether a smaller flex would help me... Was never explained what flex did to a stick and how it was used.

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09-15-2014, 10:51 AM
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Flex is how much force is needed to bend the stick. A higher flex takes more weight to flex. At 150 lbs starting out I would look for a flex around 75. The flex helps with shooting because the stick gets loaded with energy and then whips back into place sending the puck out faster. As for a curve I agree with finding a mid curve that's not too open and 3\8 to 1\2 in deep.

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09-15-2014, 11:33 AM
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AIREAYE
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Originally Posted by Valorn83 View Post
Flex is how much force is needed to bend the stick. A higher flex takes more weight to flex. At 150 lbs starting out I would look for a flex around 75. The flex helps with shooting because the stick gets loaded with energy and then whips back into place sending the puck out faster. As for a curve I agree with finding a mid curve that's not too open and 3\8 to 1\2 in deep.
He should also strongly consider intermediate sticks too in the 65-70 flex range as being 5'8", he will likely have to cut the stick, making it stiffer.

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09-15-2014, 02:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mattkaminski15 View Post
Work on skating before anything else. Master your skating stride. Then add pucks. Use the flattest curve you can find to learn to shoot. The flatter the better.

Some people would say usea bigger curve but then you don't learn to shoot the proper way. Roll the puck from heel to toe.

Squats and wall sits for leg strength to get a good knee bend.

Good luck.
Lies. Dont shoot from the heel shoot from the toe.

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09-15-2014, 03:22 PM
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AIREAYE
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Originally Posted by GinoLucia2217 View Post
Lies. Dont shoot from the heel shoot from the toe.
OK that's a more advanced shooting technique that's recently come into the mainstream. Not saying it's not worth trying to learn, but beginners shouldn't be trying to load shots from the toe when they're still learning the basics of wrist shots and passing...

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09-15-2014, 06:23 PM
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Onetimersniper28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mattkaminski15 View Post
A flat blade won't be detrimental. Most adm classes teach kids to shoot with flat blades to get their technique down. I should know, i help coach an adm class.

If a young kids can do it and its how they're taught why is it bad.

Hell it's how i was taught to shoot.

The greats all started as kids using flat blades, they learned that way and so did a lot of kids.

Let's agree to disagree.
I will give you a point. If you're able to master shooting with a flat blade, then you can use anything.
Like AIREAYE said, we represent 2 different school of thoughts. I'm sure we can both shoot very well, despite learning in a different way.

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09-15-2014, 06:26 PM
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OK that's a more advanced shooting technique that's recently come into the mainstream. Not saying it's not worth trying to learn, but beginners shouldn't be trying to load shots from the toe when they're still learning the basics of wrist shots and passing...
Besides, it takes a lot of balance to be able to shoot in stride, off the toe of the blade, while standing on the wrong foot. I realized how difficult it was when I fell to my face the first time I tried this technique.

Once you master it, it's deadly though. The modern composite sticks are built with very stiff blades, which allow you to shoot like that. As long as sticks are built this way, I won't go back to shooting snap shots off the heel.

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