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SKATES - Buying Guide and Advice III

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02-06-2012, 02:10 PM
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AIREAYE
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SKATES - Buying Guide and Advice III

Jarick asked me to write a Skate buying guide for addition to the database above and I gladly obliged. For more specific questions or suggestions, feel free to PM me

Skate Buying Guide


FIT IS THE MOST IMPORTANT
THIS IS NOT A FITTING GUIDE, BUT A PRIMER

Introduction:

It is important to understand that no skate will make you a better skater, just like any other gear, but on the flip side, having an improper skate for your foot/playing level could definitely hamper your ability. Next to helmets, skates are probably your most important piece of gear and thus, it is imperative to take the time and the budget to outfit yourself properly and if you’re fortunate to have a competent shop nearby, by all means go and seek their advice and support them with a purchase.

I also must stress that this guide is NOT INTENDED TO FIT THE READER, but intended to provide a good starting point for anyone looking to undertake a skate search, by no means is it a definitive rulebook. I write this guide to cater to anyone from the absolute beginner to the advanced level player and from toddlers to adults. Enjoy!

Sizing:

Technically a part of fit, finding the right numerical size is not an exact science, even though there are devices to measure it. Go to any skate/shoe shop looking for size and you’ll likely be sized with a Brannock device, with notches every half size along. Skate brannocks are different than shoe ones obviously and should always be used. A SENIOR size would be size 6 and above, a JUNIOR would be size 1 – 5.5 and a YOUTH would be 13.5 and below.

A very common belief regarding the relationship between shoe and skate size is that skate size is 'x' sizes down from shoe. There is no hard and fast rule about this. There is no concrete relation because of things like the fact that many people wear shoes either smaller or larger than what they should be in, or the fact that there are sizing inconsistencies from even within both shoe and skate manufacturers. The most accurate way to find your size is to determine the Brannock size and go from there. Some fitters prefer to figure out the smallest possible size that one would fit into and go around that mark, but the results should be the same. For those with differently sized feet, it is advisable to size yourself to the smaller foot, as the shop can stretch/adjust for the longer foot if they have the hardware.

For adults whose feet have stopped growing, the perfect fit is when, standing up, your longest toe skims or barely grazes the front of the toecap. One has to keep in mind that when in a skating motion and post-break-in, your foot slides back slightly, giving you a little room between toe and toecap and that your toes are not always perfectly flat when skating.

The dangers of getting a skate too big would be the risk of blisters due to a sliding foot or even bone spurs and other discomforts. Energy transfer in every stride is lost due to a sliding foot and heel lock is also compromised. For more insight into fitting children for skates, message me or post a comment in this thread.


Fit:

Now that you have found a size, it’s time to consider what type of boot from a manufacturer will fit your foot. The only way to achieve this is to understand where to start looking and trying on as many pairs in that ‘fit range’ as you can. It's important to understand that the terms I use to describe fit are not exact measurements, but are more by feel. This means that if you believe that you have a wider foot, you may still yet fit into something a little narrower. Hence, it's important to try on different fits.

Each manufacturer offers a different type of fit within each of their lines. It’s also important to know that some manufacturers have changed the type of fit/style of boot over the years so that ‘x’ brand skate from 5 years ago might not fit the same as today. For this section, I’ve decided to list out each manufacturer’s lines from recent/current times and explain some characteristics. Again, this is a rough starting point and my descriptions are (if you really want to get technical) arbitrary, but based on extensive experience.

Bauer
Features a 3 fit family with different characteristics and skates for all levels, for Bauer's descriptions, click here: http://www.bauer.com/gear/player/skates
*Note: Bauer EE width skates are 1/4 inch longer than their D width counterparts (see Width section below)

Vapor :

• Tapered fit, narrow fit
• Narrow V-shaped heel that gradually widens out to a boxy toebox
• Slightly forward leaning stance due to aggressive angle of boot, tendon guard/back spine and lacing pattern
• Shallow boot (shallow instep)
• New for 2013 onwards : Lightspeed Edge holder with quick replaceable runner system, +3mm taller holder compared to previous holders

Supreme :

• Wider forefoot/midfoot and heel compared to Vapor (Supreme C ~ Vapor D, Supreme D ~ E etc.)
• Rounder heel pocket, prominent ankle padding, more anatomically shaped than Vapor, overall a focus on an anatomical fit
• Deeper boot
• Boxy toecap
• NEW for 2014 onwards (MX3 - 160): Lightspeed Edge holder with quick replaceable runner system, +3mm taller holder compared to previous holders

Nexus :

• Wider and deeper than Supreme; widest and deepest Bauer fit
• Round, traditionally shaped deep heel pocket
• Boxy toecap, wider than Supreme
• Traditionally-built line with newer materials/technology = more forgiving/flexible than current models
• NEW for 2014 onwards (8000 - 5000): Lightspeed Edge holder with quick replaceable runner system, +3mm taller holder compared to previous holders

CCM
Like Bauer, CCM features a 3 fit family with different characteristics and skates for all levels.

CCM Ribcor
http://ccmhockey.com/microsites/skate-fit-guide/en/

• Narrower fit in general (but rather versatile, all aspects of fit are narrower than Tacks or Jetspeed/RBZ (heel, width, toebox width & depth, instep depth)
• Speedblade 4.0 holders (+ 4mm taller than previous holders) featured on all skates
• Thicker and 'plumper' ankle padding with no specific contoured shape
• Improved 'Pump' feature (50K-42K) inflates ankle area for better heel-lock
• Continuity: those who have enjoyed Reeboks in the past should likely enjoy this generation as well

CCM Jetspeed
http://ccmhockey.com/microsites/skate-fit-guide/en/
Replaces RBZ as a family with different fit

• Slightly wider than Ribcor, but slightly narrower than Tacks (in terms of forefoot width, ankle/heel, depth etc.)
• Contoured and anatomically shaped ankle and heel (similar to Bauer Supreme)
• Speedblade 4.0 holders (+ 4mm taller than previous holders) featured on all skates (except the entry Jetspeed 250)
• Reverts back to 'regular' skate sizing in line with the rest of the CCM families, Bauer, Reebok etc.

CCM Tacks (2016-)

• FIT CHANGES FROM PREVIOUS TACKS:
- Sizes larger than all other skates by 0.5 size (i.e. if you are a size 8.0 in Bauer Supreme or CCM Tacks (2014) or CCM Ribcor, you should be 8.5 in CCM Tacks (2016))
- Narrower and shallower in all areas than previous Tacks (more anatomical fit) but still wider than Jetspeed/Ribcor
- Regular pitch
• Speedblade 4.0 holders (+ 4mm taller than previous holders) featured on all Tacks skates
• Extremely heat mouldable on higher end models and a very versatile fit

CCM Tacks (2013-2015)
http://ccmhockey.com/microsites/skate-fit-guide/en/

• Widest fit in general, all aspects of fit are wider than Ribcor and Jetspeed (heel, width, toebox width & depth, instep depth)
• Speedblade 4.0 holders (+ 4mm taller than previous holders) featured on all Tacks skates
• Extremely heat mouldable on higher end models and a very versatile fit

CCM RBZ (discontinued as of July, 2015)

• Widest fit (widest heel, width, toecap etc.)
• Round, deep anatomical heel pocket
***Unique sizing scheme throughout the line: necessary to drop at least a 0.5 size from your 'regular' size (in Bauer, Reebok, CCM etc.)
• Tremendous level of heat mouldability on higher end models
• Speedblade 4.0 holders (+ 4mm taller than previous holders) featured from RBZ - RBZ 70

CCM RBZ (top end) review thread : http://hfboards.hockeysfuture.com/sh....php?t=1464383

Reebok (discontinued as of 2015)

2014 Ribcor

• Narrower fit (narrower than previous Reeboks, narrowest of CCM/Reebok's 3 families)
• Thicker ankle padding (air bladder in there)
• Pump feature beefs up ankle area for better heel-lock
• Shallower boot than CCM and Bauer Supreme/Nexus
• Round, tapered toe cap
• NEW for 2014 onwards (Ribcor - 24K): Speedblade 4.0 holder is 4mm taller than previous holders

REEBOK : 2009-2013 models (11K line, 20K line)

• Wider fit in general
• Thicker ankle padding (air bladder in there)
• Pump feature beefs up ankle area for better heel-lock
• Shallower boot than CCM and Bauer Supreme/Nexus
• Round, tapered toe cap
• From 11K line to 20K line : narrower heel, Pump works better on back ankle to lock in heel

Easton

Mako & Mako 2 :
• Unique skate design based off of speed skates - aim to to offer a completely (except for toecap) heat moldable boot that would fit most people
• One MUST heat these to try them on, as they almost completely take the shape of the foot
• Shallower boot depth
• Ability to offer a tight 360 degree wrap in ankles
• Flexible tendon guard
• Aggressive forward pitch

Graf - This is one brand of skate I have little knowledge on, for more info, visit their website (http://www.grafcanada.com/hockey_skates/) and consult a fitter carrying Graf skates. As of Spring 2016, GRAF Canada is no longer an operating company.


Last edited by AIREAYE: 05-18-2016 at 05:36 PM.
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02-06-2012, 02:14 PM
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Widths :

A quick note regarding widths; you’ll likely see letters denoting width such as ‘D’, ‘E’, ‘EE’, ‘R’, ‘W’ or ‘C’ as the most common examples. I just want to clarify that a ‘D’ or ‘standard’ width is not consistent across skate lines and same with every other letter. For example, a Supreme ‘D’ width is actually a true ‘E’ width (due to the wider last) whereas a Vapor ‘D’ could be considered the true ‘standard’. Similarly we could also say that a CCM ‘D’ is not exactly equal to either a Reebok ‘D’ or Supreme ‘D’ either. They may be similar and some of you may find little difference, but it essentially depends on your own foot shape.

As a rule of thumb, the width denominations within each skate line simply denotes whether a particular skate is wider or of regular width within its own line. It’s hard to give examples in this context since everyone’s foot is different. However, it’s safe to say that if you’re not 100% confident on a width, you shouldn’t be set on a purchase without trying either narrower or wider. Ultimately though, one must remember that a skate should wrap snugly around the forefoot without feeling pressure or pain along the sides.

In comparing a particular skate/family/brand's widths, they generally are the same length. Bauer's the exception here, as their EE width skates are 1/4 inch longer than their D width counterparts, and also feature a longer holder/blade as a result. For most people contemplating between widths, the above advice still applies as the length difference isn't significant enough to make or break, though its definitely advisable to try the half size down when going to EE.

Ultimately, in deciding between widths, it's almost always better to go with the skate that is just slightly narrower, as opposed to a skate that is just slightly too wide, because skates can be expanded (through baking, break-in, stretching, punching etc.) over time, but cannot contract.

Price-Points :

Provided that you have narrowed down your right fit to a line or two, it’s time to consider how much you want to spend and the relation to your skating/playing level. Fortunately, since this is up to the buyer, this section should be pretty straightforward. Bolded denotes the current family. Note that skate families for Bauer and CCM are usually in 2 year cycles, meaning that after 2 years, a new line comes in for each family.

Top-End Skates (Reg. $700-$900) :

YearBAUER VAPORBAUER SUPREMEBAUER NEXUSCCM RIBCORCCM JETSPEEDCCM TACKSEASTONOTHER
20161X, X9001S, S1901N, N900050K Super Tacks, Ultra Tacks VH Footwear (full custom)
20151X, X900TotalOne MX3, 190Nexus 8000, Nexus 700050KJetspeedTacksMako IIVH Footwear (full custom)
2014APX2, X100, X90TotalOne MX3, 190Nexus 8000, Nexus 7000(formerly Reebok) Ribcor(unique line, different fit) RBZTacksMako II 
2013APX2, X100, X90TotalOne NXG, One.9Nexus 1000Reebok 20K(unique line, different fit) RBZn/aMako 

This range geared towards the pro/high/competitive level skater playing very frequently over the course of the season. Built with the highest quality materials, you can expect this range to have the greatest level of support and performance for those powerful strides and movements needing maximum energy transfer; this is the biggest selling point for this level. The amount of support in both the boot and tongue is top-notch, heat mouldability should be at its best while the quality of the holder and steel should be at its highest as well (more on these below). Weight should also be at its lowest.

High End Skates (Reg. $400-$700) :

YearBAUER VAPORBAUER SUPREMEBAUER NEXUSCCM RIBCORCCM JETSPEEDCCM TACKSEASTONOTHER
2016X800, X700S180N800048K 6092  
2015X800, X700180Nexus 700048K300, 2906052Mako M8 
2014X80180Nexus 7000Reebok 30K(unique line, different fit) RBZ 100, RBZ 906052Mako M8 
2013X80One.8Nexus 800Reebok 18K(unique line, different fit) RBZ 100, RBZ 90n/aStealth RS 

This range is geared to those playing at a high or intermediate level desiring top end performance without the top end price. In my opinion, the lower end of this price range has the greatest value as you get most of the high end features at a lower price. Also, skates in this range are often (so, not always) an older model top end skate with a few differences. Materials and every other aspect should take a very slight downgrade (not always the case).

Mid-End Skates (Reg. $200-$400) :

YearBAUER VAPORBAUER SUPREMEBAUER NEXUSCCM RIBCORCCM JETSPEEDCCM TACKSEASTONOTHER
2016X600, X500S170, S160N700046K, 44K 5092, 4092  
2015X600, X500170, 160Nexus 6000, Nexus 500046K, 44K280, 2705052, 4052Mako M7 
2014X70, X60170, 160Nexus 6000, Nexus 5000Reebok Ribcor 28K, 26K(unique line, different fit) RBZ 80, RBZ 70Tacks 5052, 4052  
2013X70, X60One.7, One.6Nexus 600Reebok 17K, 16K, 14K(unique line, different fit) RBZ 80, RBZ 70n/aStealth 85S, 75S 

This range caters to the average or intermediate level skater needing a skate that will perform for them without the unnecessary stiffness and price. Specs-wise it’s simply a continuously proportional level of downgrade (obviously, right?). In my opinion, this is a great range for your average beer-leaguer or house-league/lower competitive level youth player.

Lower-Middle End Skates (Reg. $150-$250) :

YearBAUER VAPORBAUER SUPREMEBAUER NEXUSCCM RIBCORCCM JETSPEEDCCM TACKSEASTONOTHER
2016X400S150N600042K 3092  
2015X400150Nexus 400042K2603052  
2014X50150Nexus 4000Reebok 24K(unique line, different fit) RBZ 60, RBZ 503052  
2013X50One.5Nexus 400Reebok White K, 12K(unique line, different fit) RBZ 60, RBZ 50n/aStealth 65S 

This range caters to your beginner beer leaguer, house league/select player and the frequent rec skater desiring a good level of durability and performance. Great pricepoint to be at for that level of play.

Entry Level (Reg. <$150) :

YearBAUER VAPORBAUER SUPREMEBAUER NEXUSCCM RIBCORCCM JETSPEEDCCM TACKSEASTONOTHER
2016X300, X200S140N500040K 2092  
2015X300, X200140Nexus 300040K2502052  
2014X40, X30140Nexus 3000Reebok 22K(unique line, different fit) RBZ 402052  
2013X40, X30One.4Nexus 200Reebok 9K, 4K(unique line, different fit) RBZ 40n/aStealth 55S 

This range caters to your beginner skater and casual rec-skater. In my opinion, one should opt for the level of skate one (or 2) above the very bottom in this range since I find that the level of performance/durability seems to be better disproportionally, though ultimately it’s up to you on how much $$ you want to spend. At this level, the level of heat mouldability is non-existent, so you’ll have to break them in the old-fashioned way.

As the years go by and technology improves, the level of skate has progressed with it. Today’s mid/low-mid level skates are almost always at or above the level of support and weight of traditional leather-made skates. For those old-timers moving from older skates such as original Tacks generations or the original Supremes, this isn’t always a positive. That’s why again, I stress the importance of trying skates on in person.

For children fitting into youth sizes, the type of fit should carry over and the ‘finger-in-the-back’ aid would still help. However, most manufacturers offer youth skates only in either 2 or 3 price-points and the same principal of better materials/stiffness still applies, though the youth skates almost never use the same materials as the Junior or Senior models and likely won't fit the same way either. Again, see which fits your child the best and is most comfortable.

Holder/Runner :

The skate holder (plastic chassis) also varies amongst manufacturers and among price-points. It’s important to note that when considering a holder replacement, sometimes the location of the rivet holes might not always match with the boot if you want to use a brand ‘x’ holder on a brand ‘y’ skate. A competent pro shop technician should be able to tell you whether or not it would be safe for them to re-drill holes.

The skate runner (steel), like the level of skate itself, varies according to brand and price-point. At the very low-end, there are runners featuring low-quality carbon-steel which will rust more easily, is heavier and won’t hold an edge as well and for as long. The stainless steel is the most common steel and as you move up, there will be lighter steel and so forth. It is important to note that low-end skates (ex. Vapor X50) will not allow you to remove the runner for replacement (it’s integrated into the holder). It is also important to note that you cannot always use brand ‘x’ runner on brand ‘y’ holder due to different configurations. Consult your pro shop technician for suggestions or alternatives or post a question here.

There are also aftermarket steel options (like Step Steel) that offer a higher quality product. I won't get into it here because it's a more advanced option, but feel free to ask about them!

Heat Molding/Baking :

As a rule of thumb, one should almost always opt to have new skates baked so that the break-in is shortened. All current skates save for the lowest-end models have internal foams that are heat sensitive enough to be able to form better around your foot. It is important to understand that baking WILL NOT make a poorly fitting skate fit any better. It simply increases comfort and minimizes the break-in period. After each subsequent bake however, it is also important to understand that the breakdown of the foams/liners is slightly accelerated. One shouldn’t have to bake skates more than 2-3 times.

Baking should be included as part of the cost of the skate as well. DO NOT bake skates yourself at home, as a proper skate oven at the proper temperature (a small compact convection oven) is always required. Baking at home has a very high risk of damaging the skate and voiding any warranties. If there is no other option, there are videos online telling you how, but do so at your own risk.

Note : Reebok skates with Pump are able to be baked provided that the air bladder is deflated before putting them in the skate oven and remain so on the foot.

Radius of Hollow, Sharpening Tips:

Now that your skates have been properly fitted (hopefully) and baked to your foot, the next step to every new skate purchase would be to sharpen them, which, like baking, should be included as part of the cost. This is necessary since skates come out of the factory unsharpened and you simply cannot skate on them.

Radius of Hollow (ROH, also referred to as ‘cut’) is simply how deep or shallow you would like your sharpening to be. ROH measures the depth of the groove between your 2 edges and comes in denominations from 1” (shallowest) to 3/8” (deepest) and can be asked for in increments of 1/16” (ex. 9/16”). The deeper the cut, the more bite or grip into the ice you will receive, at the expense of glide and vice-versa. For the most part, the ‘standard’ cut is 1/2” and if you’ve simply been dropping off skates to your local sharpener, that is your likely hollow. Most people stay in the range of 5/8” to 3/8” (think bell curve) and I wouldn’t suggest you stray away from that unless you know for sure what you’ll be getting and what you need. The cut, thus, is personal preference. I do, however, recommend that heavier-set players try a shallower cut as they can dig into the ice with the same force while lighter-set players could try the deeper cuts. There are also other types of cuts such as Flat Bottom V (FBV), Z-Channel etc. so consult your local shop or post a question here about those.

Even edges should be verified by EVERY sharpener with some sort of gauge, like a BAT gauge to ensure that they're level and that one edge is not higher than the other. Edges should be even down the length of the blade obviously. Some people like to try and balance a coin on the edge, but be careful to keep the blade/skate perfectly upright if you want to try this. Any blade or holder misalignment should be able to be identified by the sharpener as they can feel it and see it. You should be able to 'feel' the edges throughout. Some people use their fingernails but this is BS as steel will always be harder than your softer fingernails and will always scrape. I always use the middle parts of my fingers (not the tips, as they're too soft and squishy) to scrape perpendicularly along the edges to feel for them. Unsharpened or 'rounded' edges can be felt this way.

One should get skates sharpened after every 4-5 sessions or so. Again, this is up to personal preference and level of play. One should also note that outdoor ice is tougher on your edges as well. Also, make sure to never walk on areas other than the rubber layered floor as any other surface can ruin your edges; thus it’s a good idea to also invest in some skate guards. Take care of your skates as well. Make sure to wipe down the steel and holder after every session as the water can seep in and cause rusting and damage the steel.

Accessories :

Socks :

Personal preference, but generally it is advisable to go with thinner socks for better comfort and feel of the ice in my opinion. Avoid ankle socks obviously. For those not looking to buy a pair of hockey-specific socks, there’s always the option of dress socks.

Laces :

Again, personal preference, but it is generally advisable to replace stock laces with another hockey-specific brand one (ex. Elite Hockey, Sidelines Sports etc.). Bauer stock laces are notoriously horrible while one could conceivably get away with sticking to CCM/Reebok or Easton ones. Wax laces simply offer more grip so that the boot doesn’t loosen as much over the course of the game.

Footbeds :

The necessity of after market footbeds (ex. ShockDoctor, Superfeet etc.) is of some debate and there is no set guideline for requiring them. Some people require orthotics, there are footbeds for heel support and there are arch support products. For more details, post in this thread!

Miscellaneous :

Buying Used - Not a bad option for those on a budget or for kids, but only if they fit well and are in good condition. As with all used product, try before you decide and inspect. Pay particular attention to the amount of steel that is left, as a skate that comes with very little blade (ie. very short and ground down, like a banana shape) would soon require replacement at around $70 for the pair. Also pay attention to the stiffness/condition of the tendon guard, eyelets, and the outsole for any cracking or looseness.

Pro Stock - Most pro stock skates are so heavily customized (see below) that they fit that particular player’s foot the best and not necessarily yours. The skate itself might not even resemble it’s retail counterpart anymore! Only consider if you’ve tried them on/know exactly what you’re looking for in a skate.

Custom - An option for the high end player or the player willing to drop the cash (typically an upcharge above the retail price, up to dealer, and only on certain models of top end skates). There are also some skaters with ‘abnormally’ sized feet (ie. Very very wide or narrow, differently sized feet) requiring this route as well. For custom skates, contact your local shop and they will guide you through the process.

Buying Online vs. Buying In-Store :

I'm sure many of you guys live in areas without a good selection of brick-and-mortar shops to head to for trying on skates, hence the popularity of larger online hockey retailers like MonkeySports, Pure Hockey, Hockey Giant and Total Hockey among others. The best thing is to always head to your nearest store offering a decent selection and service in order to find the best fitting skate for you and to have the services available for it. For the most part, I typically recommend that people make a day trip if it's within some distance to try on skates because it's impossible to know which one will fit your foot simply by looking online.

For those of you without that option, I recommend seeking out online retailers with a good return policy that will allow you to return any skate that does not fit. You would order a few pairs of skates that fit within your budget/needs, try them on at home, and then return the ones that don't fit as well. Keep in mind that you still have to take them somewhere to get them heat molded and sharpened for the first time, so factor in this time and cost of these services. There are formal videos out there that show you how to bake skates at home. I do not recommend you do this unless there is no other alternative possible. Bear in mind that this voids warranties if you mess up the bake.

Conclusion :

I must stress that this guide is no replacement for a competent fitter. Nor should it be your only reference if you must resort to online shopping. The privilege of having the help of a good fitter and the availability of actually trying on skates yourself cannot be surpassed. This guide is simply meant to be an introductory read into skate shopping.

Speaking of a competent fitter, for those you in reasonable proximity of a shop, head there now. If you want to see whether or not you should trust the person assisting you, simply ask them what the ‘best’ skate for you would be. If their response centres around ‘best skate = best fit’ and they have a good attitude/seem to know what they’re doing, then by all means give them your support. If not, then go elsewhere or seek out a more knowledgeable associate. Also, remember not to judge a book by its cover

Happy shopping!


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12-02-2013, 10:12 PM
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Canadiens1958
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SKATES - Buying Guide and Advice III

Link to previous here:

Part I http://hfboards.hockeysfuture.com/sh....php?t=1099867
Part II http://hfboards.hockeysfuture.com/sh....php?t=1551087


Last edited by Caeldan: 05-07-2015 at 06:02 PM.
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05-06-2015, 02:57 PM
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Dennis Reynolds
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I have a pair of Easton Z-Air inline skates from... 2002? Not really sure. Anyway, I feel like I'm losing power in my stride more and more lately. Since Easton no longer manufactures skates, and since inline season is coming up, I was wondering if there are any skates in production today with a similar fit/feel to the Z-Airs. Specifically, I'd like to know if there are any skates that have similar padding around the heel/ankle. Thanks in advance!

Edit: There's only one place in my town that sells skates, and the top model they have is a low-end pair of Missions. I am just looking for a little direction so that I could narrow down my search and not have to spend a bunch of money on return shipping.


Last edited by Fugu: 05-07-2015 at 06:21 PM. Reason: adding from next post to combine
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05-06-2015, 03:06 PM
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AIREAYE
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Try different pairs on. Skates have evolved since then, that's not the approach you should be taking.

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05-06-2015, 08:35 PM
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mattkaminski15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Malarowski View Post
Look into custom VH footwear skates too. They are made to measure and will accommodate your weird foot, if you're on Makos already, the price will be worth it. Have mine for over a year and love them.
I actually haven't gotten to try them yet, but so far the way the guy described how moldable they are I think they're the best option so far. won't know till I try them though

I will not be able to afford 900 for vh skates. I was looking at buying the clearance x100s for 419 and that was too much of a stretch. thanks though


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05-07-2015, 08:00 AM
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So, I decided (with the help of my hockey prep coach) to go with the top of the line RBZ skates. They fit amazing out of the box except they are a touch too wide, like maybe a few mm. Will that space close up when baking?

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05-07-2015, 09:18 AM
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AIREAYE
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No.

Why did you get them if they didn't fit?

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05-07-2015, 10:21 AM
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steevdeadman
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No.

Why did you get them if they didn't fit?
No, I guess I'm not communicating this well enough... They fit, when I lace them up they fit snug, but not as snug as my Reeboks. Like it's SO slight, I think it's because they aren't wrapping around the tops of my feet. Maybe my Reeboks were a slight bit too narrow and puffed out with my foot.

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05-07-2015, 12:58 PM
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Oh I see, have you baked them yet? They wrap very nicely once you do. I have a review thread with pictures on here. Do a search.

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05-07-2015, 01:03 PM
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Oh I see, have you baked them yet? They wrap very nicely once you do. I have a review thread with pictures on here. Do a search.
I won't be able to do it until Saturday AM, would it be cool to skate them on Sunday Noonish? That's over 24 hours.

Your thread is why I decided to go for the RBZs (along with my coaches recommendation).

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05-07-2015, 06:46 PM
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AIREAYE
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Yes, go ahead for Sunday. Best to have someone there (likely the sales guy) to mold the skates, meaning, have them use their hands to squeeze in parts of the boot when they're still hot and laced on your feet.

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05-07-2015, 06:50 PM
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AIREAYE
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As an aside, wow! Part 3 now! Combined 2016 posts and about 248,000 views!

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05-07-2015, 10:44 PM
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Anyone had trouble with the new LS4 steel? We've replaced 3-4 broken sets already, not good.

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05-08-2015, 08:54 AM
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Uh oh. We've had one kid break his in his first ice time. I'm hearing a couple reports on other forums too.

If this keeps up, there might be a real problem lol.

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05-08-2015, 03:10 PM
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Uh oh. We've had one kid break his in his first ice time. I'm hearing a couple reports on other forums too.

If this keeps up, there might be a real problem lol.
the edges seem to last longer than the blades themselves!

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05-12-2015, 07:27 AM
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I've read all the disclaimers and I will need pro baking molding but shops with any type of selection are in another country (Not a big deal since I live in Austria) but I need to know which brand and check if they have what my projected size is.

I have CMM U+CL in 8E. Does the CCM RBZ translate at 7.5E?

My feet are "hobbitty", bulge in the mid portion and I even had the skate punched out a bit on the right outside. I squeeze superfeet yellow insoles into my current skates in but now I can't wear socks there is literally NO MORE ROOM (instep and width) in my U+CL.

From all the reviews I would like to invest in a pair of Total One NXG but from the fit profile that looks laughable.

I would also prefer to buy 1-2 below top of the line for cost reasons and since I am not an elite level athlete. However, I find the heat moldability really does give a better fit.

Thanks!

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05-12-2015, 08:52 AM
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7.5EE should be the translation.

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05-15-2015, 09:01 AM
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Finally tried on the mako 2s and m8s. I think I'm set on these but I can't decide which to get. I'm thinking the m8s are a better value, and the few grams heavier isn't really that big of a deal, I'm just concerned they're going to be much softer when I'm skating than the mako 2s. I've done some research and people have said the same thing. I've been skating in high end skates the past couple years so I'm used to a pretty stiff boot. is the mako2 worth he small amount of added stiffness over the m8? what other advantages would I gain?

thanks

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05-15-2015, 10:05 AM
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Originally Posted by mattkaminski15 View Post
Finally tried on the mako 2s and m8s. I think I'm set on these but I can't decide which to get. I'm thinking the m8s are a better value, and the few grams heavier isn't really that big of a deal, I'm just concerned they're going to be much softer when I'm skating than the mako 2s. I've done some research and people have said the same thing. I've been skating in high end skates the past couple years so I'm used to a pretty stiff boot. is the mako2 worth he small amount of added stiffness over the m8? what other advantages would I gain?

thanks
Personally, I'd look for a pair of original Makos on clearance in your size. The sizing hasn't changed so it'll be the same size as the M8s and Mako 2s, but should be even cheaper than the M8s.

The original Makos will be lighter and stiffer than the M8s, but not as stiff as the Mako 2s. Some people had problems with rubbing with the original Makos (I haven't), but that can be solved by using a product like ezfit ankle booties.

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05-15-2015, 10:12 AM
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Personally, I'd look for a pair of original Makos on clearance in your size. The sizing hasn't changed so it'll be the same size as the M8s and Mako 2s, but should be even cheaper than the M8s.

The original Makos will be lighter and stiffer than the M8s, but not as stiff as the Mako 2s. Some people had problems with rubbing with the original Makos (I haven't), but that can be solved by using a product like ezfit ankle booties.
what about durability, I want these skates to last a while and I've heard that the original makos have poor durability, is this true?

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05-15-2015, 10:57 AM
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what about durability, I want these skates to last a while and I've heard that the original makos have poor durability, is this true?
I've only had mine for a couple months, but have had no issues. With that said, some have had durability issues, but in a lot of those cases Easton has been great about taking care of the customers.

As long as you're buying from an authorized retailer and keep the receipt the boots have a 90 day warranty and the holder and blade have a 1 year warranty.

You can find the original Makos for $400 or less now (I bought mine for around $240 at a local store, and they're readily available for $299 at Hockey Supremacy in Canada). The retail price on the M8 is around $600 and the Mako 2 $800.

The Mako 2 should go on clearance at some point next year as Easton should be releasing new skates in the Spring of 2016. One would hope that your skates would last longer than that, but even if they only last one year that would tide you over until you can get the Mako 2 for clearance prices of $400 or less.

If you buy the original Mako now for $300 and the Mako 2 on clearance next year for $400 you'll have spent $700, but you have 2 pairs of skates. If you buy the Mako 2 now you'll likely be spending at least $700 unless you go through ebay or a private seller...but sales through ebay or private sellers usually void the warranty.

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05-16-2015, 01:29 AM
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I've only had mine for a couple months, but have had no issues. With that said, some have had durability issues, but in a lot of those cases Easton has been great about taking care of the customers.

As long as you're buying from an authorized retailer and keep the receipt the boots have a 90 day warranty and the holder and blade have a 1 year warranty.

You can find the original Makos for $400 or less now (I bought mine for around $240 at a local store, and they're readily available for $299 at Hockey Supremacy in Canada). The retail price on the M8 is around $600 and the Mako 2 $800.

The Mako 2 should go on clearance at some point next year as Easton should be releasing new skates in the Spring of 2016. One would hope that your skates would last longer than that, but even if they only last one year that would tide you over until you can get the Mako 2 for clearance prices of $400 or less.

If you buy the original Mako now for $300 and the Mako 2 on clearance next year for $400 you'll have spent $700, but you have 2 pairs of skates. If you buy the Mako 2 now you'll likely be spending at least $700 unless you go through ebay or a private seller...but sales through ebay or private sellers usually void the warranty.
thanks for the advice, we looked everywhere but couldn't find a pair of mako originals.

decided on the m8. I bought them and used them tonight. No real comfort issues, my left heel was slipping up however so when I molded them when I got home I used the pinch method to create more heel lock. can't tell if it's going to work but I have a game in 16 hours so I hope the skates are fine by then.

if the heel doesn't like like I feel like it won't, so I have to attempt it multiple times? I only heated the outside, so do I have to heat the inside too?

anyway, I will test them tomorrow to see how the heel feels.

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05-18-2015, 06:05 PM
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thanks for the advice, we looked everywhere but couldn't find a pair of mako originals.

decided on the m8. I bought them and used them tonight. No real comfort issues, my left heel was slipping up however so when I molded them when I got home I used the pinch method to create more heel lock. can't tell if it's going to work but I have a game in 16 hours so I hope the skates are fine by then.

if the heel doesn't like like I feel like it won't, so I have to attempt it multiple times? I only heated the outside, so do I have to heat the inside too?

anyway, I will test them tomorrow to see how the heel feels.
forgive my poor spelling and grammar.

the heel lock molding didn't help so I tried again today. I heated the skates at 200F for 6 minutes like Easton says to. I pitched below the ankle bone but the whole skat seemed to told in as opposed to just squeezing the heel in.

am I missing something here?! these are the only skates on the market that fit me so I'd like to have as close to a 100% fit as possible

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05-18-2015, 07:02 PM
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forgive my poor spelling and grammar.

the heel lock molding didn't help so I tried again today. I heated the skates at 200F for 6 minutes like Easton says to. I pitched below the ankle bone but the whole skat seemed to told in as opposed to just squeezing the heel in.

am I missing something here?! these are the only skates on the market that fit me so I'd like to have as close to a 100% fit as possible
The Easton box on my Mako skates says the bake time is 10 minutes, but perhaps the M8 is different.

If the skates fit well everywhere else you can spot heat them very carefully with a heat gun. You'd have to keep the heat gun a few inches away (don't touch the skate) and keep moving it slowly around the area you want to heat for a few minutes.

Having someone help you is ideal. It's much easier for someone else to squeeze the heel area effectively while you have them on your feet. So ask either a friend or store employee to help you out.

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