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Pivot methods for a winger on breakouts?

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Old
12-14-2011, 08:15 AM
  #1
night-timer
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Pivot methods for a winger on breakouts?

My backwards crossovers and my pivots are not stellar.

Often, as a winger, I receive a pass from a defenceman when I am facing him. In other words, I receive the puck and then need to do a 180 degree pivot to leave our defensive zone.

What is a good pivot technique in such situations?

Yes, I know about the "have your butt against the boards" concept. (That means your body is facing across the rink, not facing directly towards either the defensive or the offensive zone.)

Often in these breakout situations, I receive the puck from the defenseman and sort of flick it behind me. I wrap the puck around me (bouncing it off the boards) and do a "dump and chase" into the neutral zone.

That allows me to pivot without puck-handling at the same time. It's a crap technique, but it takes a bit of pressure off me. What would be a better method?

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12-14-2011, 09:28 AM
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r3cc0s
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Quote:
Originally Posted by night-timer View Post
My backwards crossovers and my pivots are not stellar.

Often, as a winger, I receive a pass from a defenceman when I am facing him. In other words, I receive the puck and then need to do a 180 degree pivot to leave our defensive zone.

What is a good pivot technique in such situations?

Yes, I know about the "have your butt against the boards" concept. (That means your body is facing across the rink, not facing directly towards either the defensive or the offensive zone.)

Often in these breakout situations, I receive the puck from the defenseman and sort of flick it behind me. I wrap the puck around me (bouncing it off the boards) and do a "dump and chase" into the neutral zone.

That allows me to pivot without puck-handling at the same time. It's a crap technique, but it takes a bit of pressure off me. What would be a better method?
spend time to learn to transition...

you can turn a couple of ways.... you can always do a "tight turn" either forehand or backhand, heel to heel to the forehand (but would be slow with no momentum)

the proper transition if your feet isn't necessarially moving or even if it is, would be to hockey stop with feet slightly staggared, then to push off on the outside foot while still facing the passer to keep your blade towards the puck when recieving it, then backwards crossover maybe once or twice to get moving to pivot on your inside skate.

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12-14-2011, 09:43 AM
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wahsnairb
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my suggestion would be to not be standing stationary against the boards when you are waiting for the breakout pass.. keep your feet moving so you have some kind of momentum for a quicker turn. If you are going to be coming to a complete stop to gather the puck, make sure you are in a position to have a strong push off in the direction you are going to go; that is why butt to boards is a decent idea.. you are open to the ice to either make another pass or to start skating to open ice..

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12-14-2011, 10:03 AM
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Spend some time (at practice or pick up) pivoting with and without the puck. The thing you need to concentrate on are your shoulders. Your body works like a corkscrew, your shoulders turn your hips and your hips turn your feet. Pay attention to the differences in your shoulders when you pivot with and without the puck. (Are you right or left handed and which wing are you playing?) The technique will be different depending on what hand and which wing but either way turning your shoulders quicker will get your hips turned and get you going in the other direction quicker.

If you are turning toward your forehand roll your bottom hand over and your top hand under so that your forearms are crossed. That will turn your shoulders and your hips have to folllow.

Going to your backhand pretend that you are trying a wrap around and your heel is the post. Just do it standing still and see what happens to your body. The faster you do it the faster your body will turn all by itself. Get the technique down and then increase the effort that you put in it by bending your knees and using your quads and calfs to help the process along and get you in a position to explode forward when the pivot is complete.

One other thing is to do a crossover to begin your forward skating to take advantage of the momentum that you have created with the body turn. I see a lot of guys who turn to their forehand side and they turn with both feet on their inside edges (toes pointing out and heels pointing towards each other). This takes way too long and you end up stopping before going forward.

Hope that all makes sense visually.PM me if you have anymore questions. Good luck.

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12-14-2011, 12:45 PM
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And learn to make tight turns while controlling the puck. Often times if you are taking the pass while facing your defensman/own goal line, the first move can simply be a tight turn/crossover. Practice those and remember to lead with your stick through the turn, even when you're practicing without a puck.

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12-14-2011, 04:54 PM
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imo you shouldn't need to pivot.

Opening your body to the play and keep moving. This will allow you to get a step on the defense for a break away. The only time I turn around for a pass is if I want to slow the play down.

Work with your defense to either pass the puck where you are going to be or have them bank it off the wall so you can retrieve it in stride.

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Old
12-14-2011, 05:05 PM
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ponder
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wahsnairb View Post
my suggestion would be to not be standing stationary against the boards when you are waiting for the breakout pass.. keep your feet moving so you have some kind of momentum for a quicker turn. If you are going to be coming to a complete stop to gather the puck, make sure you are in a position to have a strong push off in the direction you are going to go; that is why butt to boards is a decent idea.. you are open to the ice to either make another pass or to start skating to open ice..
Agreed, if you're standing still at the halfboards you'll just be useless when you get the puck, you should always be skating either up or down the boards. If already skating up the ice you just keep going, if you're skating towards the dman when you receive the pass, then it's time to make a tight turn with the puck and start moving up ice, with the key being that you already have speed from being in motion. I only ever stand still with my butt to the boards when the dman is under heavy pressure and will likely be ringing the puck up the boards, but ideally a breakout should consist of a tape-to-tape pass from the dman to a winger who is in motion when he receives the puck.

As for the OP, my guess is you can't make tight turns even without the puck, and probably need to work on your edges. These drills are awesome for improving your edge work:

One thing, though, is that I'd suggest leaving the 1-footed skating drill to the end of your progression, as it's the toughest. Start with the figure 8s, progress to scissor skating, then learn tight turns/the slalom drill, and finally learn to skate 1-footed to really master your edges.

Once you can make tight turns without the puck, work on tight turns with the puck, at high speeds. At first it can be hard to control the puck when turning to your backhand side, but it comes with time. And when turning to your forehand side, make sure not to cross your arms, this puts you in a useless position coming out of the turn, instead keep your stick in its normal position and just close your blade, like this:



In general on breakouts (I mostly play wing), I like to go extra deep, like pretty close to the goal line, turn hard up ice, then receive the puck while skating up ice near the boards. Obviously you need to be able to read the play and time this properly, you need to know when your dman will be ready to make the pass. Then when I get the puck I like to step into the middle of the ice a bit, if you stay on the boards the dman can easily cut you off, but by taking a step off the boards you have way more options (can beat him to either side, chip it off the boards, move it to your center, etc.).


Last edited by ponder: 12-14-2011 at 05:18 PM.
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Old
12-14-2011, 11:49 PM
  #8
flyers10
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Here's a couple videos that may be helpful.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kuZABXbVMgc

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T1FBo...eature=related

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