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Attitude towards less-skilled players

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Old
12-15-2011, 05:07 PM
  #26
hlrsr
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LOL, a guy wanted to fight you because you screwed up a few plays? That's a hilarious level of douchebaggery.

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Old
12-15-2011, 05:27 PM
  #27
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Originally Posted by night-timer View Post
Guys, thanks for all the advice. You're right that the best players never act like jackasses. Funny, one of the guys in my social league is one of the best players in the country (Australia) - he is patient and always offers me calm advice. He's also the only one on the team who has remembered what my name is.
I love Sydney (I was there for a week in June of 2010, and I can't wait to go back). There's an amazing Chinese meditation garden near the ferris wheel by Circular Quay (I could have spent the whole week just exploring that garden). Perhaps your hot-head teammate needs to spend some time there to lower his blood pressure, haha.

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Old
12-16-2011, 11:15 AM
  #28
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its exactly the other way round on my team.

i'm one of the better players in this team. when i try to criticize someone without insults etc. or try to give an advice it will cause an endless discussion where i have to debate about right plays with people who didnt see more than 5 pro hockey games in their life and cant even stop a pass nor give one.

and after this discussion u are the arrogant *******

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Old
12-16-2011, 12:47 PM
  #29
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Originally Posted by Narut View Post
its exactly the other way round on my team.

i'm one of the better players in this team. when i try to criticize someone without insults etc. or try to give an advice it will cause an endless discussion where i have to debate about right plays with people who didnt see more than 5 pro hockey games in their life and cant even stop a pass nor give one.

and after this discussion u are the arrogant *******


I suppose the antithesis of the d-bag semi-ringer is the absolute newbie who thinks he's a legendary hockey player. He never gets better because he never accepts feedback/criticism.


Last edited by noobman: 12-16-2011 at 12:56 PM.
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Old
12-16-2011, 01:33 PM
  #30
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Same problem here. My pickups are getting more and more skilled, so I am usually the worst out there (esp on my Saturday pickup). I may get a pass or two and usually flub it. Most people are fine with me, but you can tell some would rather I'd not show up.

Whenever I get discouraged playing with this situation, I just say to myself "I'm here for the exercise". And it is true. I started when I was 46 and didn't know how to skate. I just try and skate hard, do the best I can...there is nothing else I can do (other than quit, and I am not going to do that). I'm in really good shape now after a year...of course that is replaced by a perpetual state of soreness.

Mark

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12-16-2011, 03:46 PM
  #31
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Originally Posted by MarkIvan View Post
Same problem here. My pickups are getting more and more skilled, so I am usually the worst out there (esp on my Saturday pickup). I may get a pass or two and usually flub it. Most people are fine with me, but you can tell some would rather I'd not show up.

Whenever I get discouraged playing with this situation, I just say to myself "I'm here for the exercise". And it is true. I started when I was 46 and didn't know how to skate. I just try and skate hard, do the best I can...there is nothing else I can do (other than quit, and I am not going to do that). I'm in really good shape now after a year...of course that is replaced by a perpetual state of soreness.

Mark
Why don't you work off ice with a tennis ball? Work on your stick handling, passing and receiving passes, it doesn't have to be all on ice training. And you shouldn't get discouraged because you've been playing one year. Nobody just steps on the ice and is an elite talent. It takes years of developing your skills and if you want to get better you're going to have to work hard at it.

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Old
12-16-2011, 04:00 PM
  #32
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A couple of years ago (well, more than a decade ago), in a competitive league, I was on a team of university-aged kids playing with this rookie 16-year-old. The kid was a forward by training. He struggled a bit to start the year; a non-factor up-front. The last 16 games of the year he was converted to defense because he was an amazing skater with size (guy was nearly 6 feet and fairly bulky) and we needed another d-man. This kid struggled so majorly. He was getting beat, weak on his stick, started handling the puck like a grenade....just a mess. But he always hustled, and it looked like he was picking things up in the final games of the year. Our team ended up losing the division and lost in the second round of the playoffs. In the final game, that guy took the penalty that led to the tying goal.

At the end of the year, as we were all leaving the rink, all of us were very cold towards him. Our captain, who had been suspended down the stretch for two-handing a goalie was oozing hostility. I wasn't feeling very gracious myself. One of the other players on our team, went to the guy and said "walk with me" and then kind of loudly said "don't worry about what those *****s say. It wasn't your fault".

That kid went on to have a really solid career and ended up getting drafted. No pro-time, but that example always kind of stuck with me on how to treat young, inexperienced players.

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Old
12-16-2011, 05:21 PM
  #33
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Originally Posted by Devil Dancer View Post
The only thing that bothers me about playing with less skilled players is that the less skilled players on my team tend to take really, really long shifts. I don't know why there's a correlation, but in my experience there is.

Hey, buddy, we all paid the same amount to be on this team, get the **** off the ice before you hit the 3 minute mark.
If a guy can last three minutes on the ice, then he is not trying.

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Old
12-16-2011, 05:55 PM
  #34
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Originally Posted by Devil Dancer View Post
The only thing that bothers me about playing with less skilled players is that the less skilled players on my team tend to take really, really long shifts. I don't know why there's a correlation, but in my experience there is.

Hey, buddy, we all paid the same amount to be on this team, get the **** off the ice before you hit the 3 minute mark.
On most of the teams I've played on the long shifter is a better player, but on one of my teams we have two less skilled guys that just stay out there for freakin' ever, just floating around and it drives me nuts. I want to just scream at them in particular, but I don't want to pick on them so I just remind the entire bench - "short shifts, short shifts". Somehow, those two still don't get it.

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Old
12-16-2011, 06:48 PM
  #35
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Try your hardest and do your best not to make the bad play, if your skating fast and not turning it over they don't have a reason to be mad. They can say that you didn't get a goal all they want but if you come out of the dressing room satisfied because you made a good pokecheck or lifted a guys stick in a prime spot then thats what hockey IS supposed to feel like. If your happy with your game then that's all that matters. If your giving your all then don't even worry about them.

I have one guy on my team in the 7 years I've played I've never been frustrated with a guy until this year. In his defense he is quite a bit "bigger" and I mean in width. He doesn't skate or make an effort to get the puck, he doesn't pass and if he does get the puck he either turns it over or dumps it and goes for the icing. He has no idea what an offside is even though he's played for 11 years. Its just horrible and when your on his line coach pulls us off quicker because he can't be trusted defensively, and when you suggest to him to do something differently(not attacking) he has no regards for team play and tells you to **** or says I don't care. Utterly frusterating.

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Old
12-16-2011, 08:54 PM
  #36
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Originally Posted by Stickmata View Post
On most of the teams I've played on the long shifter is a better player, but on one of my teams we have two less skilled guys that just stay out there for freakin' ever, just floating around and it drives me nuts. I want to just scream at them in particular, but I don't want to pick on them so I just remind the entire bench - "short shifts, short shifts". Somehow, those two still don't get it.
X2. Hockey is an anaerobic sport, not aerobic. It's supposed to be a 45-75 sec. sprint and then get off. It takes everything I have to keep my mouth shut when a guy 10 years older than me, 30-50 lbs overweight, that takes 3 min. coasting shifts says " man you really get winded fast". Yeah because I'm sprinting all out for 45-60 sec.

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Old
12-16-2011, 08:59 PM
  #37
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To the "I'm better than you" crowd. Unless your pro or where at one time you're an idiot. It's all relative. I skate circles around old fat guys that play once a week and are out of shape. I get embarrassed by Junior A and NCAA D1 level players.

Am I good or do I suck?

Answer: Unless your pro, you suck. Lose the attitude and just have fun playing the game. I use this rationale frequently in our men's league on opposing players that think they're good and are arrogant about it. They don't like me very much

In my area the best players are usually the spoiled brat rich boys that were on the ice 5-6 days a week since the age of 4, never go pro, don't work out of high school and live with mommy and daddy well into their 30's.

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Old
12-18-2011, 08:14 AM
  #38
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Originally Posted by Guffaw View Post
X2. Hockey is an anaerobic sport, not aerobic.
Can I have more details on eaxactly what that means? I asked one of my team-mates whether I should jog or ride a bike for off-ice training.

He said, "run, but it has to be interval training".

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Old
12-18-2011, 09:19 AM
  #39
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Originally Posted by night-timer View Post
Can I have more details on eaxactly what that means? I asked one of my team-mates whether I should jog or ride a bike for off-ice training.

He said, "run, but it has to be interval training".
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High-in...erval_training

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Old
12-18-2011, 11:52 AM
  #40
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Originally Posted by night-timer View Post
I have been recently playing in several social leagues and at pick-up hockey where quite a few players, sometimes the majority, are more skilled than me. I can feel self-conscious playing in or against these teams, as though I am letting the team down or causing frustration for them.

Then again, last night my social league team lost 4-Nil. Okay, I didn't score a goal, but neither did the better players on the team.

It's just that a week ago, a guy on my team in a pick-up session almost wanted to "start something" with me in the carpark after the game because I had screwed up a few plays.

I am grateful for the advice I get from better players and I know I'm not the team's greatest asset, but how should I approach playing on these teams? Endlessly apologizing gets me nowhere. Everyone tells me you've gotta play against stronger players to challenge yourself and improve.
First of all you need to stop hanging around such **********. Trying to start **** over a game of pick up? that guy needs a two hand in the teeth. My team is a mixture of guys that played competitive and junior right down to guys that started played 3 years ago. The stronger players are on mixed lines with weaker players which works great because the other team focuses on the good players and leaves the lesser players wide open which results in a goal most of the time

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Old
12-18-2011, 01:08 PM
  #41
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Originally Posted by Godzilla View Post
If a guy can last three minutes on the ice, then he is not trying.
that's what i'm saying.. i was a certified personal trainer, i am 25, played three high school sports (including hockey) and consider myself to be in good shape, but if i am out there for two minutes straight i want to throw up.

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Old
12-18-2011, 01:54 PM
  #42
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Here is the deal for forwards: if you are not getting some points (a few goals and a few assists here and there), eventually it will become less and less fun for you. No one expects you to turn into an all-star over night, but you should play at the skill level where you are getting points on a regular basis.

In my opinion, that's how you get better. Playing over your head won't help you. Playing with and against players one step better than you is the way to go.

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Old
12-18-2011, 02:12 PM
  #43
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Originally Posted by Strakanator View Post
Here is the deal for forwards: if you are not getting some points (a few goals and a few assists here and there), eventually it will become less and less fun for you. No one expects you to turn into an all-star over night, but you should play at the skill level where you are getting points on a regular basis.

In my opinion, that's how you get better. Playing over your head won't help you. Playing with and against players one step better than you is the way to go.
This is pretty hard though when you play hockey in another country like the OP.

I'm in the UK and as such the vast majority of guys I play with are Slovaks, Swedes or Canadians who have played more games of hockey by the age of 8 than I have in my whole life. There's really no opportunities to play hockey with beginners. I play ball hockey, but I think the same principles apply.

I think the best thing to do is:

1) Understand what you can and can't do very quickly.

Ask some of the better players (not the d-bag who went after you, don't give him the pleasure) what they think and see what they say. For me I had very poor stick handling skills and not much vision, but I had size and I didn't mind getting my hands dirty, so I focused right away on getting the ball in the corners, making safe passes and basically gaining but not giving up possession for my team. It was slightly dull, but even if I tried to score goals I wasn't going to, so at least I wasn't getting frustrated. Once or twice I picked the pocket of some good players in the corners, which gained me some respect.

2) Keep your head on a swivel.

One of our best players, who is normally a really nice guy, yelled at me once for losing the ball to an opposition player because I jogged to the corner and the guy came up behind me and took the ball. I wasn't necessarily being lazy, I just had no idea he was coming up behind me. If you look around and make sure you see everything, you don't get embarrassed like that.

3) Practice your butt off.

Hey, if you want to become better it won't happen by accident. I practiced in my kitchen, in my hallway and on a tennis court weaving my stick and ball through cones. After a week or two I was improving my stickhandling to the point that guys could pass the ball to me without me whiffing, and I had an actual shot.

4) Play hard, and don't hog time.

Obvious...I think guys who come from different sports (I played rugby) are more used to pacing themselves. When you're expected to play for 80 minutes the idea of dragging yourself off the rink after 2 minutes (the usual shift in my ball league) is slightly strange.

The nuclear option: Can you play goalie? I used to play it on the street in California, put the pads on and never stopped, and nothing gets guys off your back and on your side like a kick save on a breakaway.

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Old
12-18-2011, 02:38 PM
  #44
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What is it with hot head beer leaguers and parking lots

I have had a similar experience as the OP when I was 18. I wasn't very good at this time, but neither were most of the guys I played with. I was the most inexperienced on the team, and the youngest by far. I played defense for our team, and every time I made a mistake I heard about it from our second best player. Every time. His criticism was never constructive. One time, I made a bad play that impacted a game that we ended up losing. The guy was being such a dick in the parking lot. it almost turned me off to playing all together. "Nice play Bobby Orr" etc.

Thankfully the only guy on our team that was head and shoulder better than the perpetrator overheard and came over. I wont forget the service he did for me. He looked the guy in the eye and said "shut the **** up and keep your temper in check or don't bother showing up to the rink"

The next game I had the best game of my career to that point. Scored 2 goals off slapshots from the point (both weak goals from a goalie standpoint, but I'll take it anyday ) The guy who gave me a hard time eased up, and surprise, I played better without him harking over my every mistake. I owe a lot to the guy that had my back that day... Or I probably wouldn't be playing today a decade later.

OP, I understand that my situation won't help you remedy yours, but the point of my post is for the rest of the people reading this thread. When you see a beginner getting into it with a parking lot tough guy, or just a ****** teammate in general, stand up for him. It really means a lot.

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Old
12-18-2011, 07:02 PM
  #45
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Originally Posted by New England Hockey View Post
What is it with hot head beer leaguers and parking lots

I have had a similar experience as the OP when I was 18. I wasn't very good at this time, but neither were most of the guys I played with. I was the most inexperienced on the team, and the youngest by far. I played defense for our team, and every time I made a mistake I heard about it from our second best player. Every time. His criticism was never constructive. One time, I made a bad play that impacted a game that we ended up losing. The guy was being such a dick in the parking lot. it almost turned me off to playing all together. "Nice play Bobby Orr" etc.

Thankfully the only guy on our team that was head and shoulder better than the perpetrator overheard and came over. I wont forget the service he did for me. He looked the guy in the eye and said "shut the **** up and keep your temper in check or don't bother showing up to the rink"

The next game I had the best game of my career to that point. Scored 2 goals off slapshots from the point (both weak goals from a goalie standpoint, but I'll take it anyday ) The guy who gave me a hard time eased up, and surprise, I played better without him harking over my every mistake. I owe a lot to the guy that had my back that day... Or I probably wouldn't be playing today a decade later.

OP, I understand that my situation won't help you remedy yours, but the point of my post is for the rest of the people reading this thread. When you see a beginner getting into it with a parking lot tough guy, or just a ****** teammate in general, stand up for him. It really means a lot.
I was in a situation just like that. I'd make a mistake and the guy would harp and ***** non-stop, then he would go out and do exactly what he would always tell me not to do. The difference with my situation is that the rest of the players on the team were his friends and NO ONE ever said anything to me. My confidence in everything went into the toilet. I was afraid to make a pass, take a shot, or pretty much do anything else. I'd get the puck and immediately either dump it off the glass/boards (I played D) or look for someone to pass to. It got to the point where I just stopped showing up for them. The next year I joined a different team as a forward and lit the place up (mind you, this was C division rec league but still, I was top 3 or something in scoring). Played amazing for the new team and in the summer I made the big mistake of going back to that team with the dbag on it. That dbag wasn't on the team anymore but everyone else was and I immediately sunk into my old habits.

I'm on an amazing team now where everyone is great. There really isn't a moral to my story but it's mainly just to say that sometimes there isn't that guy that stands up for the "lesser player". If you're not the lesser player and you see some of that crap going on, be THAT guy. It will mean a lot and you never know, maybe he's a better player than you think and he just needs some encouragement and teaching.

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Old
12-18-2011, 09:07 PM
  #46
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I play on a Midget house team and it's my first year playing out, (I've played goalie since I was 7) and there is a guy or two on my team who is kinda like that. They always call for the puck, and if you don't give it to them right away, they get frustrated with you and right when you get to the bench, they always say, "hey dude you have to pass more I was wide open!" when really there was an opposing player right with him. Then when they have the puck, they never pass and try to go through the whole team and score. My solution to this was simple, give them the puck when they call for it. Then they cant say **** when they lose the puck to the other guy and are forced to blame it on theirselves. Then the odd time they do score and you get a well deserved assist.

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12-18-2011, 09:17 PM
  #47
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Devil Dancer View Post
The only thing that bothers me about playing with less skilled players is that the less skilled players on my team tend to take really, really long shifts. I don't know why there's a correlation, but in my experience there is.

Hey, buddy, we all paid the same amount to be on this team, get the **** off the ice before you hit the 3 minute mark.

I've noticed that too. I think the problem is that when someone can't skate hard or stop hard, they don't really get tired too quickly, they're just coasting out there. They figure they're not tired yet, so they don't need to get off. Then guys who go ripping around and come off after 60 seconds end up sitting on the bench for 4-5 minutes, and the next time they go out they go nice and slow to make their shifts last.

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Old
12-18-2011, 09:22 PM
  #48
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Originally Posted by night-timer View Post
I have been recently playing in several social leagues and at pick-up hockey where quite a few players, sometimes the majority, are more skilled than me. I can feel self-conscious playing in or against these teams, as though I am letting the team down or causing frustration for them.

Then again, last night my social league team lost 4-Nil. Okay, I didn't score a goal, but neither did the better players on the team.

It's just that a week ago, a guy on my team in a pick-up session almost wanted to "start something" with me in the carpark after the game because I had screwed up a few plays.

I am grateful for the advice I get from better players and I know I'm not the team's greatest asset, but how should I approach playing on these teams? Endlessly apologizing gets me nowhere. Everyone tells me you've gotta play against stronger players to challenge yourself and improve.
It's happened to be before,not a good feeling. What you should do is,is to stop thinking about what other people think about how you play and work on improving it. Thats what the biggest difference is in my game today which wasn't in it a year ago. A year ago I joined a hockey league,where I started fretting over how others would think if I messed up,turned me into a wreck with the constant uproar of thoughts regarding it. But this year,it's different.Why,because I over the off season worked on getting better and not thinking what others would think if I messed up on a certain play. We all mess up,but what we could do is learn from our mistakes rather than crying over spilled milk.

Definitely take advice from players and the coaches,and implent some of their suggestions into your game. Best of luck!

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Old
12-19-2011, 12:06 AM
  #49
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Originally Posted by Stickmata View Post
If you're gonna make hockey a life long passion, you have to learn to ignore the a-holes early. Hockey's not a game of perfect. Don't waste time apologizing. Just play and have fun.

The only piece of advice that I'd give is when you're playing above your skill level, focus on defensive responsibility first and skate hard. A weaker player that plays smart and plays defensively can still add a lot of value to a team. And hockey is a team sport. Usually it's the a-holes that are first to forget that.
Absolutely spot on advice

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Old
12-19-2011, 01:15 AM
  #50
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Originally Posted by night-timer View Post
Can I have more details on eaxactly what that means? I asked one of my team-mates whether I should jog or ride a bike for off-ice training.

He said, "run, but it has to be interval training".
I was an exercise phys major 16 years ago so you're really testing me, but here goes without getting to technical.

Anaerobic(without oxygen)- The system that supplies energy during intense efforts. Sprinting, quickness, agility, power, and a 45 -60 sec. shift in hockey. Most would agree it is the most important system for a hockey player. To train it you need to perform activities at very high intensity for 10-60 seconds.

Aerobic(with oxygen)-The system that fuels low intensity, long duration efforts. Marathon runners etc. Not as important as anaerobic for a hockey player, but still important. It aids recovery on the bench and allows you to repeat your 45 sec. shifts over and over again.

When you friend says intervals he means this for example. 2 min on an exercise bike at a decent pace(75-85%) max heart rate, then 30-45 sec. full out (85-95%) max heart rate, then back to 2 min, then another 30-45 sec., etc. etc. Similar to a shift, then rest on the bench.

I will say this, I've been out ~12 weeks with a sprained lcl and acl. The past 6 weeks I've done interval training 3X a week on a bike and eliptical. Tonight was my first time back on the ice in 12 weeks. I was not 100%, but wow what a difference from times past when I did nothing or just did aerobics. I felt great. It works.

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