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The 2011 Single-A Draft (roster, picks, discussion, everything)

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Old
12-30-2011, 12:06 AM
  #201
seventieslord
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Michal Rozsival, D



Roszival is also 35th in post lockout TOI/GP with 22:33/game. 4th among available players. And 1st among those who have played for teams that were above average. Career average: 21:30.

Roszival has averaged 22 adjESP/season and 12 adjPPP/season in his 700+ games. With 249 points he is among the three highest scoring defensemen of all-time available. he is a decent 2nd PP unit guy at the A level.

He has killed 38% of penalties for his teams in his career, and they've been 7% better than average.

Rozsival was New York's clear #1 defenseman for 4 straight seasons following the lockout, before playing one more as their clear #3 following the emergence of the Staal/Girardi juggernaut.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sports Forecaster 2007
no one logged more ice time than Rozsival did last year. Thrown out there in all situations, he improved in every aspect of the game. He was more consistent, avoided injury, produced more offense and made great strides in his defensive work. His +35 was tops in the league. It appears all he needed was a comfort zone.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sports Forecaster 2008
would not be a #1 on many teams, but he wears that hat pretty well with the Rangers. Led the club in ice time again and plays in all situations. Should continue to thrive under a heavy workload...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sports Forecaster 2009
one of the more underrated defenders in the game, Rozsival plays in all critical situations and does everything asked of a top-pairing defenseman. Cracked the top 30 in ice time, points and blocked shots, all while mentoring rookie Marc Staal. Big Czech is quite durable, missing only 4 games since the lockout.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sports Forecaster 2012
points went down, but the hits and blocked shots skyrocketed, showing he can adapt to any system.

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12-30-2011, 01:05 AM
  #202
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***Tomorrow is a 4-pick day, to make a total of 25, right?****

Quote:
Originally Posted by BenchBrawl View Post
Well , in the ATD , MLD and AAA drafts we routinely draft forwards that are far less talented than first line players from lower draft because of the role they are playing , so why shouldn't we do the same with defensemen? De Vries is a very good 5th or 6th defenseman at this level.
But you should see that it is not the same thing.

Forwards have a wide variety of roles, from scorer to playmaker to "glue guy" to defensive forward, to goon, and we try to select the best of all-time throughout the drafts. Yes, we do draft Bob Gaineys and Guy Carbonneaus and Shayne Corsons, who probably did get less ice time than some of the second rate 1st and 2nd liners the team had throughout the years, like, say, Stephane Lebeau, Russ Courtnall or Gilbert Dionne. We do make that determination that, despite their NHL coaches giving them less minutes, they were more valuable and will be more valuable performing a role in the ATD setting, as "glue guys", shutdown forwards, energy line players, or thugs.

But we're not out there looking for the best 2nd and 3rd-pairing guys of all-time to fill those 2nd and 3rd-pairing ATD roles, are we? We have guys like Eric Desjardins and Leo Reise on 2nd pairings - multiple all-stars. We even have hall of famers and multiple all-stars dotting 3rd pairings. But these guys were stars - how can they adjust to being 3rd pairing players, right?

Simple - they're better defensemen. The roles of defensemen are much simpler and much less specialized. You don't have a "scoring pair", "checking pair" and "energy pair" - at even strength, every pairing is meant to do the same thing: prevent goals against, get the puck to the forwards, and some offense and hits are a nice bonus. the measures that we typically use to judge defensemen, do a pretty good job of representing how good they were, at these typical jobs.

Coaches want to win games, and they want their best players out as often as possible. the reason lidstrom doesn't play 60 minutes is because he's not infallible. once he gets to that 27 minute mark, a player like brad stuart in his 20th minute would be more effective on the ice. if a coach could play lidstrom for 60 minutes you better believe he would. point is, i believe coaches speak the loudest with the minutes they give out. i don't believe any coach would say, "Jones is not as good as smith, so i think i'll put jones out there for 20 minutes and smith just 17". if a player is more valued and more effective, he'll earn more minutes.

so, draft a career 3rd pairing defenseman if you must, but keep in mind that it means at any given time there were at least 4 defensemen an NHL coach who knows a lot more than you or I, valued more highly. It wouldn't hurt to pause and ask, 'why am i drafting this guy when the coach valued this other guy more?'

De Vries isn't a terrible pick and i do think he has redeeming qualities. he was #3 for Colorado when they went to game 7 in 2002. No team would be that good with Staios playing #3 minutes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by VanIslander View Post
a) They are two very different players. They only "played the same role" if you are talking statistics!!
offensively, defensively, physically, they were similar players. They were out there to be space fillers and not hurt the team while the real difference makers rested.

b) You don't see how Staios comes out ahead because you disregard the intangibles I wrote about in the bio, with linked quotes of testimony.[/quote]

sure I did, if by "disregard" you mean "acknowledge".

Thing is, do you think it is difficult to find defensemen who were enthusiastic, physical leaders and contributed more to their teams on the ice and contributed to better teams?

Quote:
c) I have seen both DeVries and Staios a lot and it was easy to pan Greg but hard to pass up Steve! I've always liked his style of game and he has been underappreciated at times. His work ethic and leadership is admirable, his checks hard, his ebnergy contagious? DeVries? *Yawn* The best you can say is he was quietly effective. He wasn't an alternate captain for half a decade nor captain of a franchise for a season, though I don't mention this statistic-like, as anyone who has seen DeVries and Staios play a lot has to understand WHY one would and the other wouldn't be captain material.
I pay attention too, you know. I watched as both started out looking like they'd be perrennial healthy scratch candidates (Staios wasn't a full time NHL defenseman until 27, and De Vries at 24 was still playing as much in the minors as he was in the NHL. Those players don't scream "i have an 800+ NHL game career ahead of me". So I do appreciate the work ethic BOTH showed to become useful, contributing players for a decade apiece.

De Vries and Staios were both "valued" just as much by their respective coaches; this shows in the ice time both were given. But you're ignoring the situational effects that come into play. De Vries' coaches, most often, were operating outfits that were getting 100 points and going deep in the playoffs consistently. To get minutes that contributed to that much team success, is worth more. Some intangibles that aren't exactly unique, don't undo that. De Vries was quietly effective, "effective" being the operative word. Shouldn't matter how he or Staios did it.

I agree Staios' leadership qualities are somewhat more pronounced, but you also have to understand that De Vries spent most of his career on an absolutely loaded Avs team - how is he going to get a letter playing for them? (he did wear a letter in Atlanta). Staios was always an "elder statesman" on a team that was typically among the league's youngest. Not exactly the hardest situation to get the A in.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hedberg View Post
Quebec selects

D Benny Woit



1952 Stanley Cup Champion
1954 Stanley Cup Champion
1955 Stanley Cup Champion

Red Wings Legends:
dammit, I really wanted Woit as a spare since he can play some RW too. He is one of a small handful of guys who lasted 300-350 games in the NHL pre-expansion, but what makes him unique is that he did it for a powerhouse team that was tough to crack.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BillyShoe1721 View Post
He went in the MLD last year, which was probably too high. We're many, many more picks in, so I'll give this guy a shot as one of my spares to fill a spot in my top 6

LW Stanislav Konopasek

he definitely deserved to drop far. I wonder if this is the right place. VI, your thoughts?

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12-30-2011, 01:35 AM
  #203
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seventieslord View Post
***Tomorrow is a 4-pick day, to make a total of 25, right?****
Right.

Quote:
Originally Posted by seventieslord View Post
he definitely deserved to drop far. I wonder if this is the right place. VI, your thoughts?
Konopasek was on our longlist in the Double-A draft but there was too big a question about competition level to justify the pick then, except as an extra skater, and we had some better extras to get!

Extra skater in the Single-A draft is respectable. I was pretty sure Hedberg would nab him, fortunately as a spare. A team WOULD take a flyer on the guy, invite him to camp, and see if he could perform against a higher level of competition. I've always thought extra skater is where such guys should go. I think Bobrov is a solid ATD pick as an extra skater, and always have, even before he was drafted in the main draft. Now he gets top-6 duty on a team of all-time greats?! Even in a 40-team draft that seemed like a risky proposition. The bigger the question mark, the better the bench!

BTW, the greater the star a player was against lower level competition, the greater likelihood he could have made the jump! Those marginal 50's Soviet domestic league wingers chaosrevolver drafted in the wake of papershoes' ill-chosen MLD Soviet-themed selections last year were barely stars, really just a bit better than the competition, playing against much lower level competition.

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12-30-2011, 01:45 AM
  #204
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Yeah I definitely threw VanI a PM basically asking whether or not Konopasek is a worthy pick at the end of the AA draft...I assumed he was at that point as a spare. Be it the A or the AA draft I think he's worthy as a spare. Its too hard to prove his worth as a regular but I think that as a spare he's perfect.

Whether or not he's worthy of more duty who knows. I think that he probably is at the A level but that's absolutely my opinion that there are no elite players here defensively to stop him so I see no reason that it wouldn't work out in his favor. I am sure that seventies will have an argument proving me wrong with this.

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12-30-2011, 06:20 AM
  #205
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The Minutemen select a 500-goal scoring Jew who even Hitler had to let the team captain play for Germany at the 1936 Olympic Games because of his reputation as one of the best and his role in the nation's winning a medal (Bronze) at the '32 Olympics.

Rudi Ball, scoring right winger



Quote:
A real artist at skating and stick handling.. combined with a 'deadly shot'...
http://www.azhockey.com/Ba.htm

- was voted as the best European ice hockey player in a French Sports Magazine in 1930
- was considered one of the most popular and dreaded European ice hockey players prior to the Second World War.

Quote:
... While reasonably short, Ball was considered extremely fast on the ice and was admired as having much skill and ability.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rudi_Ball

Quote:
In 1936, having Jewish heritage, Ball (the 25-year-old captain) was initially overlooked for selection in the German ice hockey team. ... Ball also believed a deal could be struck to save his family in Germany if he returned to play in the games. The German selectors also realized that without Ball.. the team would not stand a chance of winning. Another factor was that the Nazi party could not overlook the fact that Ball was without doubt one of the leading athletes in his sport. With much controversy Ball was included in the German team to play at the 1936 Olympic games. The deal for Ball's family to leave Germany was also agreed. After Ball was injured, the Germans took 5th place in the Olympic tournament. Ball played four matches and scored two goals.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rudi_Ball

Olympic Bronze (1932)
World Championship Silver (1930)
European Championship Gold (1930)
World Championship Bronze (1932)
European Championship Bronze (1936 & 1938)
8 German Championships (1928 - 1944)
Spengler Cup (1928-29, 1934-35 & 1935-36)
IIHF Ice Hockey Hall of Fame (2004)


Last edited by VanIslander: 12-30-2011 at 06:52 AM.
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12-30-2011, 06:52 AM
  #206
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The Minutemen select Paul Baxter, the role-playing defenseman who taught Kevin McClelland how to fight. Baxter led three NHL franchises in penalties, not to mention being the WHA career leader in penalties taken. However, he did more than just drop the gloves: he showed he could take a regular shift. He had a 43 and a 32 point season in the NHL, and a 46 and 35 point season in the WHA. That's quite a bit for an enforcer. He five times took over 120+ shots a season (twice over 150 in the NHL) and scored 11 points in 11 games in a WHA Finals run. In 1982 he led the NHL in PIMs with a staggering 409 PIMs and still managed to score 9 goals and 34 assists from the blueline. He scored 20 powerplay goals over a five year span. In 1984 he led Calgary in playoff penalties in a Game 7 divisional finals run against Edmonton. Two years later he played 13 games of the Flames Stanley Cup Finals run. He not only fought, but he checked hard and drew penalties, is an agitator in that regard.



Quote:
In the midst of the 1981-82 season, the year Paul Baxter had the second most penalty minutes in league history, opponents were being suspended left and right for attempting to injure the deeply religious but far from angelic defender. Baxter, in his third year in the NHL after leading the WHA in career penalties, claimed again and again to be flummoxed by the constant parade to the penalty box, saying he was merely aggressive and that larger players didn't like being hit so hard by a smaller man.

In one stretch no less than five players were suspended for a total of 20 games in incidents related to the Pittsburgh Penguins defenceman. On November 21, 1981, Chris Nilan of Montreal threw a puck at Baxter in the penalty box after an altercation, opening up a cut that required eight stitches and netting the Canadien tough guy a three-game suspension. On December 9, Philly's Paul Holmgren was so intent on getting to Baxter that he punched referee Andy Van Hellemond. Holmgren was suspended for five games. December 14, Barry Bubba Beck and Nick Fotiu of the Rangers were convinced Baxter had been up to evil and led a charge of their New York fellows off the bench to correct matters. Beck was gone for six games, Fotiu for one. Finally, normally mild-mannered Blaine Stoughton was sent home for eight games when the league ruled his series of cross checks to Baxter's head was an intent to injure.

Baxter, who had to overcome a serious injury in 1980 when linesman Bob Hodges skated over his wrist, severing four tendons, and finished the 81-82 season with 409 penalty minutes.
http://www.legendsofhockey.net/Legen...p?player=11938


Last edited by VanIslander: 12-30-2011 at 07:12 AM.
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Old
12-30-2011, 11:48 AM
  #207
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Montreal select a player I'm surprise is still available in Alexander Frolov LW


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12-30-2011, 11:50 AM
  #208
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Montreal select Manny Legace G

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12-30-2011, 11:50 AM
  #209
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Montreal select Keith Yandle D

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12-30-2011, 12:11 PM
  #210
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Brent R. Peterson – 4th line center and penalty killer



- 6'0", 190 lbs
- Strong defensive center with excellent PK record (42% usage, 8% better than average)
- 13th in selke voting in 1986 with 4 votes
- Buffalo's Unsung Hero (1983)
- Peterson’s teams were 8% below average at ES and on the PP, but he helped them transcend their mediocrity on the PK

:wow: I have never seen someone I profiled in the MLD/AAA/AA/A draft so lauded in the Hollander handbooks for their all-around play!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey, 1986-1988 editions
not a great scorer but is one of the NHL's most underrated all-around centers... usually assigned to check opponents' best offensive center... credited with doing an outstanding job neutralizing such outstanding centers as Wayne Gretzky, Bryan Trottier, Dale Hawerchuk and Peter Stastny... a dedicated team player and gifted penalty killer... you'll usually see him on the ice late in games in crucial situations because of his defensive ability... one of the best faceoff winners in the NHL.

Media hailed his arrival as the only significant move the Canucks made in 1985-86... a chronic inability to score has badgered his career, but he remains one of the NHL's premier checkers and faceoff artists... served as Canucks' acting captain when Stan Smyle went down prior to the 1986 playoffs... Neutralizes the game's top scorers...

strictly a specialist... one of the NHL's most accomplished checkers... coaches value his ability to contain the NHL's best scorers... most adept on faceoffs... loathes the losing that keeps occurring in Vancouver... acquired from Buffalo in the 1985 waiver draft, considered a steal at the time...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report, 1987-1990 editions
Peterson is a good skater, a strong skater who can see a lot of ice time but rarely gets tired. He is not exceptionally quick and can not make the moves required to succeed in the offensive zone (credit an old ankle injury for that) but Peterson will get where he's going on hustle and determination.

Peterson has a high degree of anticipation and hockey sense, sees the ice well and reads the play very well, making him an excellent checker and penalty killer. Because of his anticipation, he is a threat for a SH goal every time he's on the ice.

He also plays defense smartly, and will not make mistakes in his checking or positioning. He too, yet again, is another case of "toss the +/- out the window." It is completely unindicative of Peterson's performance.

He is an excellent faceoff man, one of the more underrated in the league in that department. Brent has good hand/eye coordination and that, along with his hand strength, gives him an edge in the circle.

Peterson is not really an offensive threat, but he can handle the puck fairly well and he does get it to his teammates because of his anticipation ability. Any scoring he does will have to be from close to the net.

Peterson is tough and he can take the physical abuse. He is a grinder in the defensive kind of way and uses his body well when checking to tie up the opposition. He has very strong hands and wrists and that powers his faceoff ability, as well as making him effective along the boards or in corners.

Peterson is Vancouver's best character player, a worker and a talk-it-up guy in the locker room. He brings a maturity and high work ethic - to say nothing of a strong defensive performance - to an often immature Vancouver team.

...obviously Peterson fills a role here, but it is a very large role. He is a consistent player who works hard and brings maturity and experience... gives Vancouver a strong defensive presence at center ice not unlike - though not as accomplished as - Doug Jarvis or Guy Carbonneau.
Helge Bostrom, D – 7th defenseman



In 1923, when approximately 30 defensemen could have a full-time job in a top pro league, he did. By 1931, there was room for about 40 full-time defensemen in the NHL. He was still one of them, with Chicago. He played as a part-timer for two more seasons, until he was 39, three years older than any other NHL player, then played three more in the minors.

In between that, he had a four-year stint in the AHA, the world’s 2nd -best league following the merger. This makes it look like he was a sub-NHL player brought back for some reason by Chicago. In 1930-1933, though, he was clearly still good enough for the NHL – he was not just toiling for a crap team. Chicago was 79-74-31 (.514) with the 36-39-year old Bostrom helping out on the blueline.

His ascent to the top leagues was delayed by a short stint in the military, and a five-season career in the Manitoba and Saskatchewan senior leagues, where a number of future top-level players played.

He also played in an impressive 25 top-level playoff games, scoring 3 points. Among available players, circa 1933, this is unprecedented; only one player even comes close in this regard. Bostrom was a Stanley cup finalist in 1924 with Vancouver, and in 1931 with Chicago but never won the big prize.

At first glance it is tough to see what Bostrom did that made him a good, serviceable player. He didn’t get any all-star or hart recognition, even in the AHA, from what I can see. He had just 24 points in 202 top-level games (about 0.12 PPG; Matte and Moran, two players with similar career paths at the same time, averaged about 0.50 and 0.33, respectively). He was fairly small for a defenseman at 5’8”, 185 lbs, and with 148 PIMs in the top leagues he didn’t appear to have a mean streak either. To me he seems like a lesser version of Art Wiebe, a guy who just hung around forever as a below-average player in the upper crust of players.

What would Bostrom be as a modern player? Obviously the following numbers are rough and speculative. If you imagine that he was about the 20th-40th -best defenseman in the world for a 10-year period to keep the top-level jobs that he did, and assume the talent pool is 3X bigger now, you could extrapolate this to being 60th -120th for a decade: somewhere between a good #3 and a below average #4, for a period of 10 years. Also, nowadays no player would go play senior hockey or in the war nowadays. Knowing what we know, if he was good enough at age 28-39, then he was probably good enough at 22-27 as well. 18 years as a #3-4 defenseman is pretty strong. Marc Bergevin was a #4-7 for that long and he’s already selected.

Quote:
Originally Posted by loh.net
Defenseman Helge Bostrom played with several different teams in his native Winnipeg, beginning with the Monarchs of the city's Senior League in 1916. He also played two years for the Ypres. He missed the 1918-19 season as a result of the aftermath of World War One. When he returned to playing the following year he played two years in the Saskatchewan senior league with the Moose Jaw Maple Leafs.

Bostrom continued to head west, stopping for two years to play with the Edmonton Eskimos of the WCHL. In keeping with his theme of moving westward, he was traded to the Vancouver Maroons where he played for another two years.

In October, 1926 Bostrom was traded to the AHA's Minneapolis Millers for cash compensation to the Maroons. He was there for almost three years before being called to the NHL by the Chicago Blackhawks for 20 games in 1929-30. Bostrom played a total of 96 games in the NHL, all with Chicago, over a four-year period but as a fill-in player he was never afforded the luxury of being able to showcase his talents over a prolonged period of time. He continued to play for several more years, retiring after playing with the Kansas City Greyhounds of the AHA in 1935-36. While playing in the NHL with the Blackhawks, Bostrom became fond of doing newspaper crossword puzzles during the long train rides between cities. His defensive partner Amby Moran was more interested in card games. On one trip Bostrom had the puzzle down to one missing word. "Hey Amby," he called out. "What's a four-letter word meaning bird?" Without hesitation, Moran answered "Goose" and then proceeded to spell it for his good friend "G-O-S-E." "Hurrah," Bostrom shrieked with excitement. "It just fits." The scene had the entire train car laughing.

Bostrom lived his latter years in Deer River, Minnesota and died on January 25, 1977 at the age of 83.

Marty McInnis, F – 13th forward



- 420 career points in 796 games (2nd -most among available players)
- Killed 32% of penalties for his teams (10% below average)
- Just one available player has at least 300 points and at least 28% PK usage
- 281 ESP (3rd most among available players)
- 21 SHP (4th most among available players)
- Played 3 seasons at center with two 46+ point seasons
- Played 5 seasons at LW with three 44+ point seasons
- Finished off as a RW for 4 years, scoring 42 points once
- From 1994-2001, was an 18+ minute forward
- Wore the A in Anaheim
- Good defensive acumen and work ethic
- could fill in at any position in this draft, except maybe 1st line center
- Only drawbacks were his size (5’11”, 187) and faceoffs (45.5% on his career)
- Never getting out of the first round of the playoffs sucks for him too

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1994-95
Mark does a lot of the little things well. He plays positionally, is smart and reliable defensively, and turns his checking work into scoring opportunities with his quick passes and his work down low... He isn't fast, but he is deceptive with a quick first few strides to the puck. He seems to be more aware of where the puck is than his opponents, so while they're looking for the puck, he's already heading towards it. McInnis is a good penalty killer because of his tenacity and anticipation. He reads plays well on offense and defense. Playing the off wing opens up his shot for a quick release. He is always a shorthanded threat.

McInnis is not very big, but he is sturdy and will use his body to bump and scrap for the puck. He always tries to get in the way.

McInnis has always had to work hard just for people just to give him a chance to prove himself. Last year he was among the Isles' best, most consistent performers... a two-way winger who can net 25 goals a season.
Bob Wall, D/LW – 8th defenseman/14th forward



I profiled Wall last year and will paste in everything later on. For now:

- cup finalist with Detroit, holding down a job in the tiny pre-expansion NHL
- Was both a LW and a big minute defenseman with LA post-expansion, also serving as captain
- Went to the WHA and had 112 points in 253 games

Quote:
Wall was significant for a few reasons: He won a Memorial Cup in 1962, he got to the Stanley Cup Finals in 1966 with Detroit, he was a significant minor league offensive defenseman between 1964 and 1967, he played big minutes for the LA Kings in 1968 & 1970, he captained them for two seasons, he had an 861-game pro career, and he could play LW in addition to defense. There may be better defensemen out there, but his pedigree as an NHL captain and as a multi-positional player make him a solid choice as a spare here.

In 1973, Wall was the 13th-highest scoring blueliner in the WHA, a point behind Ted Green and just 6 behind Mike McMahon, who had led the NHL in defense points five years prior. In 1974, he was 18th with 37 points.

In the 1964 AHL, Wall was 9th in scoring among defensemen, in a league loaded with future NHLers. In 1965, he was 4th with 46. Mike McMahon led with 61. In the 1966 AHL, despite missing 9 games, Wall was 2nd to only Jim Morrison, who had enjoyed a decent NHL career that expansion was about to lengthen. In 1967, he played just over half the season in the AHL but scored at a rate that would have made him the league's leading scoring blueliner.

In the two seasons that Wall played as a defenseman with LA, he averaged 22.62 minutes per game.

Quote:
Originally Posted by loh.net
While playing junior hockey, Wall was part of the Memorial Cup winning Hamilton Red Wings of 1962. A team that boasted the likes of future NHL players such as Paul Henderson, Ron Harris, Lowell MacDonald, Bryan Campbell and Pit Martin and is considered to have been one of the greatest junior teams ever assembled.

The big opportunity for Wall came about in 1972-73 at the age of 30 when the newly formed World Hockey Association came into existence. Desperate to fill their rosters, the teams knew they needed some veteran players to help mold their squads. The Alberta Oilers took a chance on Wall, and he repaid them by having a career year offensively, potting 16 goals and 29 assists for 46 points in the 78-game regular season. Even Wall himself was shocked at the high calibre of his play. He was quoted that season as saying "there's no doubt, this is the best season I've ever had."
Quote:
Originally Posted by Players: The Ultimate A-Z Guide Of Everyone Who Has Ever Played in the NHL
a la Red Kelly, Wall moved from defense to forward during the thick of his career, and he later switched back when he got to the NHL. Like many players of his vintage, he was a part timer in the 1960s until expansion, after which his career took off.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1974
all brains and definitely underrated... can also play LW... doesn't take many penalties but is quite effective in front of the net... not much of a gambler.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1977
has tremendous capacity to bounce back in a hurry... has been carried off the ice looking like he's dying, and he's back the next shift... largely underrated... a pro's pro...


Last edited by seventieslord: 01-05-2012 at 12:19 AM.
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12-30-2011, 12:17 PM
  #211
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Originally Posted by BenchBrawl View Post
Montreal select Keith Yandle D
He's the only guy left with a top 5 finish in Norris voting, and I believe he's been the only one for a long time.

The reason he fell is obvious though.

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Old
12-30-2011, 12:21 PM
  #212
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheDevilMadeMe View Post
He's the only guy left with a top 5 finish in Norris voting, and I believe he's been the only one for a long time.

The reason he fell is obvious though.
I felt like he at least deserved to bve picked this year with his pretty big year.He also had other decent seasons but obv is resume is very short.Still , his offensive/defensive game and the ice-time he got in his big year was enough for me to pick him ahead of ''games compilers''

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12-30-2011, 12:23 PM
  #213
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To complete my team , I will honor a great fighter in Georges Laraque W

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12-30-2011, 12:28 PM
  #214
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Well this is it , the 2011 year is complete for me.I was honored to participate all year long to these great projects and learn some more about hockey history with very knowledgable people.I participated in every draft this year and look forward to do the same in 2012 with hopefully better results with the experience I acquired.I must have drafted something like 125 hockey players & coaches all year long and it was great learning a little bit more about them.

Happy New Year ATD-Community.

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12-30-2011, 02:20 PM
  #215
BillyShoe1721
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VI-I did not select Curt Lundmark as the OP suggests.

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12-30-2011, 02:46 PM
  #216
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A big body with some offense and two-way game to finish out my 4th line, C/RW Nik Antropov



I'll also select my backup goalie, Ed Chadwick, who for 2 seasons played all 70 games for the Maple Leafs in the O6 era, which is a significant accomplishment at this level. He also enjoyed a successful career in the AHL, being named a first team all star once, and a second team all star twice. He was also a 5th team NHL All Star in 56-57.



RW David Vyborny, who was a solid contributor for the Columbus Blue Jackets in his time in the NHL with an adjusted PPG of .62, twice leading the team in scoring. He also boasts an impressive international resume, being a five time World Championships gold medalist, in addition to winning a silver and 2 bronze medals. He was named to the all-star team for the World Championships in 2006 as well.


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12-30-2011, 04:57 PM
  #217
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Quebec selects:

C Danny O'Shea



Played in 1969 and 1970 All-Star Games

Legends of Hockey:
Quote:
Centre Danny O'Shea played 369 NHL games for three different clubs between 1968-69 and 1872-73. He was a fine playmaker and faceoff specialist who could play a feisty brand of hockey if the game turned rough. Highlights of his international career including suiting up for Canada at the 1967 World Championships and the 1968 Grenoble Olympics. O'Shea enjoyed nearly three full years in Minnesota and formed a solid line with Danny Grant and Claude Larose in 1969-70.

Late in 1970-71 season he was traded to the Chicago Black Hawks. His solid work as a foot soldier was important to the team's drive to the Stanley Cup finals. O'Shea was a solid checker in 1971-72 before he was traded to the St. Louis Blues. In 1972-73 he scored 38 points and was a solid checker although he was not pleased with being switched to the wing.
D/LW Kevin Morrison



1st Team WHA All-Star (on D) 1974-75
2nd Team WHA All-Star (on D) 1975-76
317 pts in 418 WHA Games

Hockey Draft Central:
Quote:
Led WHA defenseman in scoring with 81 points in 1974-75. ... Assisted on Wayne Gretzky's first professional goal while playing for Indianapolis vs. Edmonton on Oct. 20, 1978

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Old
12-30-2011, 05:25 PM
  #218
VanIslander
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The Minutemen select Ernie Wakely, the 1959 Memorial Cup champion goaltender who couldn't lock down an Original Six Era NHL job but showed with hockey's expansion in his thirties that he could have had a more significant career in a larger NHL if there had been one in his twenties (imagine a 30-team NHL like today). His career took off when he proved himself too good for lower levels of hockey. He was an all-star in the CHL and AHL in consecutive seasons just before, as a 30 year old, he backstopped the St. Louis Blues to the 1970 Stanley Cup Finals, starred in the 1971 NHL all-star game and lost only 14 games in 51 starts in 1970-71, jumping thereafter to the more financially lucrative WHA where he went on to become the WHA's career leader in shutouts and games played, and 3rd all time in wins. As a 37 year old, in the second to last year of his career, he was a 2nd team all-star in the WHA. He was inducted into the WHA Hall of Fame.



Quote:
... displays excellent anticipation and plays the angle shots as well as anyone.
http://images.checkoutmycards.com/zo...c2a87b0e2b.jpg

He was the only goaltender - in fact only player - not yet drafted this year who is a member of the WHA Hall of Fame. The induction committee was comprised of players, coaches, historians and the media, and the mere fact that they chose him to be so honoured is some evidence of his worth as an all-time great. How great may be an issue, but as backup in a depth draft, he will have the chance to show his talent and impress others further. All things considered, he has demonstrated talent and success at various levels of hockey and is a question mark worth profiling in a depth draft.

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12-30-2011, 05:40 PM
  #219
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Quebec selects

D John MacKinnon


Legends of Hockey
Quote:
Defenceman John McKinnon was a useful goal scorer from the point who played over 200 games in the 1920s and '30s. He could also make quick passes and play the body in his own zone.

Born in Guysborough, Nova Scotia, McKinnon first made a name for himself in the USAHA with the Cleveland Indians and Fort Pitt Hornets. In November 1925, he signed as a free agent by the Montreal Canadiens but spent most of the season in the CHL with the Minneapolis Millers.

Prior to the 1926-27 season, the talented rearguard was traded to the Pittsburgh Pirates for cash. He scored 13 goals in 44 games that year then helped the team reach the playoffs in 1927-28. As the Great Depression neared, the Pirated were struggling on and off the ice. One of the lone bright spots in 1929-30 was McKinnon's ten goals and overall hustle. He remained with the team when it relocated to Philadelphia and went on to post a humiliating 4-36-4 record in 1930-31.

McKinnon spent his last seven years as a player in the AHA with three different clubs. In 1931-32, he scored 16 goals for the Kansas City Pla-mors. He later won league championships with the Kansas City Greyounds in 1933 and the St. Louis Flyers in 1936. After retiring in 1938, McKinnon spent a year as the Flyers' coach.
RW Chris Clark



Washington Captain 2006-2009
Captain of USA at 2007 World Championships

Forecaster:
Quote:
Always displays solid leadership qualities. Uses speed, grit and tenacity to play a sound checking game. Is also versatile enough to occasionally play on a scoring line.

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12-30-2011, 06:14 PM
  #220
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The Minutemen select Jack Kelley, the legendary coach of Boston University who four times went to the NCAA tournament between 1963-1972 including back-to-back NCAA championships in his last two years there, named college coach of the year in 1972. He had a 206-80-8 NCAA win-loss record, for a winning percentage of .720. Earlier in his career, he had equal success over 7 years with Colby College, in which he set historical precedent by winning the 1962 NCAA coach of the year award with a "small college" squad. After his ten seasons at Boston U., he jumped to the WHA and immediately coached a team to the championship in 1973.



Quote:
More than just a recruiter and coach, Kelley was a teacher whose knowledge and skills were imparted to many of his players who later assumed coaching positions on a variety of levels.
http://terrierhockey.blogspot.com/20...ey-mentor.html

Nicknamed "The Mentor", a statue has been erected in his honour.


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12-30-2011, 06:22 PM
  #221
Rob Scuderi
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LW Ty Arbour

56 points in 209 NHL GP
83 goals 114 points in 141 WCHL GP
x1 WCHL 2nd AST ('22)
x1 Allan Cup winner

Quote:
Originally Posted by LoH
A veteran of the Great War, Ty was the older brother of Jack Arbour who had a similar, though slightly more successful, career. He was in the services from 1915 to ‘18, after which he pursued a hockey career out West, moving from Brandon to Edmonton and, finally, out to Vancouver to play for the local Maroons.

Vancouver sold Arbour to Pittsburgh during the Pirates’ first NHL season, and early the next season he was involved in a three-way deal that saw him go to Chicago, Bert McCaffery to Pittsburgh, and Eddie Rodden of Chicago to Toronto. He spent all of the next four years with the Hawks, though the team struggled on the ice and at the gate.

Arbour finished his career in the minors, playing two years in the IHL and finishing with the Edmonton Eskimos.
Quote:
The Pirate leader will start Ty Arbour at left wing; Hib Milks at center; Harold Darragh at right wing; Charley Langlois, right defense; Johnny McKinnon, left defense, and Roy Worters in the nets.
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...+darragh&hl=en

Quote:
When he was injured the captain was playing on the starting line with Ty Arbour and Earl Miller.

(lots of info on Matte)
...Joe Matte, who has been doing yeoman duty with Gordy Fraser on the defense the last few games, is expected to continue in the starting lineup, leaving Art Berlett for spare work. Matte has done remarkably well of late and warrants his being played more regularly. Aside from being strong on the defense, his speed and shooting also adds strength to the offense, which has been noticeably weak in recent games.
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...y+arbour&hl=en

Quote:
Both Art Gagne and Ty Arbour showed flashes of the hockey that made them two of the greatest wingmen of the old Western Canada League. Both men can skate as fast as ever and they still know where the goal is when they get a chance to shooot.
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...y+arbour&hl=en

Quote:
Vancouver grabbed off Amby Moran and Ty Arbour as improvements;
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...y+arbour&hl=en

Quote:
...and Ty Arbour were the shining lights, between them scoring most of the goals
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...y+arbour&hl=en

Quote:
Less than two minutes after the start Ty Arbour put the Hawks one goal up and even with the Canadiens squad on the round when he skated through the Canucks defense to score alone. The shot was low and coming from the left boards, went past Hainsworth's knees.

...Howie Morenz clashed with Ty Arbour behind the Hawks nets and Arbour was carried off the ice. Morenz was given a minor. Arbour was found to have torn a ligament in his leg.
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=UOBfAAAAIBAJ&sjid=T20NAAAAIBAJ&pg=45 12,1449629&dq=ty+arbour&hl=en"]
Quote:
...and Ty Arbour were the shining lights, between them scoring most of the goals
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...y+arbour&hl=en[/URL]

Quote:
Ingram got the puck in a scramble and shoved it to Ty Arbour, who with a second to go found the top corner of the net with a beautiful snap shot.

...Although closely checked, Arbour broke away and barely got his stick to a loose puck. He had a fraction of a second to make the short shot but succeeded, nicking the corner of the net.
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...y+arbour&hl=en

RW Harold Darragh

117 points in 308 NHL GP
x1 SC champion
Quote:
Originally Posted by LoH
Like other Canadian kids growing up in the early 1900s, Harold Darragh learned to play hockey on the frozen ponds during the harsh Canadian winters.

As a young man Darragh and friend Hib Milks moved to Pittsburgh to play with the Yellow Jackets, a minor-pro team. Harold Cotton and Lionel Conacher were teammates of Darragh. He was known as being one of the cleanest players in any game, rarely taking needless penalties.

After a couple of years leading the minors, Darragh moved up to the NHL's Pittsburgh Pirates, where he produced five productive seasons of what would be an eight-year NHL career.

In 1925-26, Darragh played in 35 games, scoring ten goals while assisting on seven others with only six minutes in penalties. He followed that up with a 42-game performance the next year, scoring 12 times while assisting on three others. His most effective offensive season came in 1929-30, at the age of 26, when he scored 15 goals and 17 assists for 32 points in 42 games.

In 1930-31 he divided his time between the Philadelphia Quakers and the Boston Bruins before playing a 48-game season with the Toronto Maple Leafs in 1931-32. Never one to shy away from a confrontation, Darragh's aggressive, yet clean style often resulted in his receiving injuries, the most notable of which came during his stay with the Bruins, when shortly after arriving, he received a serious leg injury which tied him up for the better part of the season.

When the Bruins asked for waivers on Darragh, the Toronto Maple Leafs purchased his rights for $5,000. He joined the club the same year historic Maple Leaf Gardens opened its doors. Darragh scored five times and assisted on ten others that year and helped the team win the Stanley Cup, with the legendary Dick Irvin behind the bench. He returned to the Leafs for 19 games in 1932-33, scoring once and adding two assists. That would mark the end of his NHL playing days. His professional hockey career ended after the 1935-36 season, where he played for the Pittsburgh Shamrocks of the IHL.

The final statistics on Darragh's NHL career read 308 games played, 68 goals, 49 assists, 117 points and just 50 minutes in penalties.
Quote:
Harold Darragh of the Pittsburgh Pirates, has been awarded the "clean play" trophy for the 1927-28 season of the National Hockey league. Darragh...spent 1620 minutes on the ice and 10 in the penalty box.

...In the last three seasons he has been in the penalty box only 15 times for a total of 30 minutes.
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...+darragh&hl=en

Quote:
Harold Darragh, star right winger...
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...+darragh&hl=en

Quote:
There have been some great hockey players here throughout the years-Roy Wroters, Harold Cotton, Hib Mils, Harold White, Harold Darragh, Lionel Conacher, Herb Drury, Terry McGovern, Dinny Manners, Frankie Brimsek...
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...+darragh&hl=en

Quote:
Red Horner, Harold Darragh, Ace Bailey, Harold Cotton, and Andy Blair were the other hard-working standouts for the Leafs.
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...+darragh&hl=en

Quote:
Harold Darragh put the visitors back on even terms shortly after another minute's play when he dashed down his wing and zipped a shop through the defense to beat Benedict.
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...+darragh&hl=en

Quote:
Veteran Harold Darragh back-handed the Leafs' final goal.
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...+darragh&hl=en


Last edited by Rob Scuderi: 12-31-2011 at 01:19 PM.
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12-30-2011, 06:39 PM
  #222
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Coach Red Kelly
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wikipedia
After the Maple Leafs won the Stanley Cup in 1967, Kelly announced his retirement as a player, and negotiated with the expansion Los Angeles Kings to be their inaugural coach on the strength of Imlach's assertion that Toronto would not stand in the way of Kelly's coaching career. However, Imlach insisted that Los Angeles draft Kelly in the expansion draft, and after the Kings failed to do so, refused to release Kelly's rights until Los Angeles traded a minor-league defenceman to the Leafs.[3]

Despite being the only rookie coach, and being in charge of the favorites to finish last, Kelly went on to guide the Kings to second place in the West Division and made the playoffs two years in a row.

In 1969–70, Kelly moved on to coach the Pittsburgh Penguins for three seasons, making the playoffs in his first and last seasons with the team. Kelly returned to the Maple Leafs as coach in 1973. He stayed in the position from 1973–74 to 1976–77. The team earned a playoff berth in all four seasons with Kelly as head coach but got eliminated in the quarterfinals each time.

His final regular season coaching record was 261–311–128.
Quote:
Kelly, the National Hockey League Coach of the Year last season,...
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...ed+kelly&hl=en
Quote:
But the Toronto defence was simply too sharp for Philadelphia's forays and effectively squelched them most of the game. Toronto now leads the best of seven series 2-0...Centre Bobby Clarke..was limited to only one shot.

Kelly said the key to the victory was the checking, "I thought that we did a tremendous job checking and containing the Philly attack which sometimes overwhelmed us in previous games."

Toronto's style was so effective because the Leaf players were able to cut down the centre ice zone, forcing the Flyers to get away from their system.
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...ed+kelly&hl=en

Quote:
"They knew we were around," Kelly said, "and that's the way it's going to be the rest of the series. They didn't intimidate us one iota."

Proof of the Penguins bravado lay in the 139 minutes of penalties meted outed by referee Art Skov, the preponderance of them for fighting.
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...ed+kelly&hl=en


Last edited by Rob Scuderi: 12-31-2011 at 01:38 PM.
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Old
12-30-2011, 07:03 PM
  #223
Rob Scuderi
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G Jarmo Myllys

OG 10-4-1; 1.87GAA, 3SO
W-CUP 1-1-0; 4.00, 0SO
WC 10-6-3; 1.88GAA, 4SO
21-11-5

x1 OG Silver
x2 OG Bronze
x1 WC Gold
x3 WC Silver
x1 WC Best Goalie ('95)
x1 WC Best GAA ('97)

x1 Elitserien MVP
x1 SM-liiga Golden Helmet
x2 SM-liiga AST
x1 SM-liiga Best Goalie

Definitely a flop during his time in the NHL but still a good international career.

Quote:
Originally Posted by LoH
Myllys made an early impact on the scouts while playing on the Finnish medal-winning team at the World Junior Championship. At Oslo, Norway, in 1983 he achieved his first international success by leading his team to a silver medal behind the powerhouse Soviets in the under 18 European Junior Championships. He also won twin awards as best goalie and a place on the media's first All-Star team. The following year the silver streak continued in Sweden with the under-20 team again finishing behind the Soviets in the World Junior Championship. This limelight performance made him the Minnesota North Stars' draft pick in 1987 and a year later he joined the club.

Since Minnesota already had a Finnish goalie in Kari Takko, Myllys who also had trouble settling in to the North American style of play spent most of the time in Kalamazoo with the IHL Wings. There he relearned his craft and was twice selected to the IHL All-Star Team. In the NHL, he played with the San Jose Sharks and saw action in 27 games without impressing coach George Kingston, who gave him every opportunity. The Sharks traded his rights to the Maple Leafs, but Jarmo decided to return to Finland.

In the summer of 1994, after two years at home, Lulea HF talked him into moving to Sweden. He has been there ever since, becoming a legend in that country too as the all-time shutout king with 29 zero-goals-against games and counting. He also became the first goalie in the Swedish league to score a goal. His 29 shutouts put him 12 ahead of Ake Liljebjorn, who needed 15 years to achieve his total. Getting a goal was a long-time ambition for Myllys, and on January 16, 1999, his dream came true when, late in a game against Leksand IF, his stickhandling skills were rewarded by an empty-net marker in a game Lulea won 4-2. Myllys claims it was a perfect effort?the puck sailed through the air and went into the net without anybody touching it.

After his initial season in Sweden, he was offered a contract by the Ottawa Senators but decided to stay put. It turned out to be a good choice. Led by Myllys, Lulea dominated the league. His impressive goals-against average helped the club capture the national title, but it did even better in the playoffs by going all the way to the its first and only gold in national championship play.

Finland has three major achievements in international hockey to date
: the first medal ever, which was the Olympic silver at Calgary in 1988; its first world title, which was won in 1995 in Stockholm; and the victory over the best of Canada in the 1998 bronze medal game at the Nagano Olympics. Myllys was part of all three and in 1995 was awarded the trophy as the tournament's best goalie. In addition, he is one of the rare athletes to have won medals in three Olympic tournaments, with a bronze also from the 1994 event in Lillehammer, Norway. In addition to the 1995 gold, he has two silvers from the IIHF World Championships in 1994 at Milan and 1998 at Bern, Switzerland.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wikipedia
Myllys established himself as a star in Sweden, staying with LuleŚ for 7 seasons (1994–2001). During that time Myllys won several awards and played twice in the Elitserien all-star game. Myllys also scored two goals in two Elitserien games, which is a rare feat for a goalkeeper. Myllys returned to Finland in 2001, however.

Aside from his great success on club level, Myllys was also an accomplished goalkeeper in international competitions. Myllys made a total of 188 appearances for Finnish national ice hockey team.

Altogether, Myllys competed in 7 World Championships Tournaments, 3 Olympic Tournaments and 2 World Cups. Myllys had his finest hour in the 1995 World Championship tournament as Finland won its first ever World Championship by defeating Sweden 4–1, with Ville Peltonen scoring a hat-trick who played alongside future NHL stars Saku Koivu and Jere Lehtinen. Myllys played a big part in the match and nearly kept his net empty, but a small mistake cost him a shutout.

Overall Jarmo Myllys is one of the most accomplished goalkeepers in Finnish Hockey history.


Last edited by Rob Scuderi: 12-30-2011 at 09:47 PM.
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12-31-2011, 06:27 AM
  #224
VanIslander
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The Minutemen select Jack Parker, the winningest coach ever for a NCAA college team with a 853-438-111 win-loss record at Boston University. He is the only three-time NCAA coach of the year, the first time in 1975 and the last in 2009. He coached his team to nearly a dozen divisional titles and three national titles over three different decades (1978, 1995 and 2009). Parker has been to the Frozen Four more times (13) and more N.C.A.A. tournaments (23) than any other college hockey coach, including five straight appearances in the finals between 1974-1979 and seven in an eight-year span between 1989-97. He's won more games in NCAA postseason play than any other coach.



Quote:
Originally Posted by SI, March 23, 1998
Jack Parker's eyes widened through his dark-rimmed glasses, and his cheeks turned redder than face-off dots as he leaped off the bench at Harvard's Bright Center on Nov. 25, 1997, and stood behind the gate in the boards. He flailed his arms like a conductor and ruffled the silver hair, button-down shirt, rep tie and blue blazer that made him look more like a college professor than a hockey coach as he shouted at referee Bill Doiron, "Get the fóover here!" The veins in Parker's neck bulged. Although his Boston University squad held a 4-1 second-period lead, Parker was furiously summoning Doiron, who had just slapped BU with a two-minute penalty for having seven players on the ice during a line change. Parker blocked the gate and refused to send one of his players to the penalty box. Several expletive-filled yelps later, the coach was hit with a delay-of-game penalty.

For that brief spell he had been the old Jack Parker, the loudmouthed chain-smoker who, when he became BU's varsity coach at age 28, in 1973, had a temper hotter than Mike Keenan's. Twenty-five years ago outbursts were normal for Parker, whose idea of a good time was guzzling beer and inhaling cigarettes. Those habits, though later abandoned, forced him to undergo minor surgery on Jan. 27 to unblock a coronary artery.

"He used to be an absolute lunatic," says Mike Eruzione, who skated for Parker from 1973 to '77 and was captain of the U.S. Olympic hockey team that beat the Soviets and went on to win the gold medal in 1980. "He would yell and scream and turn different shades of purple. Today he's much calmer and more of a friend or father figure to the players."

Parker, 53, hasn't smoked a cigarette in 16 years. He drinks tea with honey, and he puts a comforting arm around his players instead of a headlock. Since the death of his first wife, in 1978, he has raised their two daughters. He now sheds his problems not on bar stools but during restorative afternoon outings aboard his 36-foot sailboat, Twin Lights. One thing, however, hasn't changed: Parker's teams are still winning.

The Terriers (28-7-2), who through Sunday were ranked second in the nation behind defending NCAA champion North Dakota, are the top seed in the Hockey East tournament this week, a position they hope to secure in the NCAA tournament as well. The NCAA finals are being played in BU's backyard, at Boston's FleetCenter.

In Parker's 25 years at BU, the school has won two NCAA championships (1978 and 1995) and had only four losing seasons. Parker has coached 14 Olympians, most recently Tony Amonte and Keith Tkachuk. Thirteen former Terriers began the season in the NHL.

"Lots of coaches have had success, but guys like.. Joe Paterno.. and Jack Parker are great because they know how to sustain that success," says Ben Smith, the 1998 U.S. women's Olympic coach and Parker's assistant from 1981 to '90. "They adapt their style to fit each era."

Twenty-five years ago Parker's tyrannical style stood out. As a defensive-minded center at BU from 1965 to '68, he played for hard-driving taskmaster Jack Kelley. When Parker became the school's B-team coach in 1972 and then varsity coach a year later, he mimicked his mentor by installing a rigid system with boot-camp-style practices. A self-proclaimed "egomaniac with an inferiority complex," he rejected all suggestions for improving the system, even from assistant coaches. But nobody argued with his results: a 122-29-2 record and four ECAC I crowns from 1973 to '78.

"I thought there was only one way to do things, and that was the way we did them," says the fast-talking native of Somerville, Mass. "But if I was like that now, these kids would leave, because they have other options besides college."

In the '70s, Eruzione says, "young coaches were very demanding and hyper, and screaming and yelling were part of the process. Jack was trying to be a young Vince Lombardi."

What should have been among his most gratifying achievementsówinning his first national championship, in 1978ówas bittersweet because his wife of 10 years, Phyllis, had recently died of cancer. Suddenly Parker found himself a single parent, faced with raising his daughters, Allison and Jacqueline, then nine and five. With the help of his mother, who moved in, and Phyllis's parents, he kept the household going. But by his own admission, he was smoking and drinking too much.

BU missed the NCAA tournament from 1979 to '83. "I used to sit in a barroom or a house party with people and have a few beers and five packs of cigarettes and talk about how bad things were," Parker says.

Parker started to make changes in his approach to coaching. He became more sensitive to his players and more open to his assistants' advice. In 1983 he recruited center John Cullen, who led BU back to the NCAA tournament in 1984. Two years later Parker married Jacqueline Gibson, whom he had met when she worked in the BU athletic department in the late '70s. "I wasn't so miserable anymore in my personal life or my hockey life," Parker says. "I changed my 'everything sucks' attitude to a 'this is pretty good' attitude."

In the '90s he has navigated BU to eight consecutive NCAA tournaments and helped his players cope with a series of tragedies, including forward Kevin Mutch's death in a car accident on Labor Day 1992; goalie J.P. McKersie's near-fatal bicycle crash in July 1994; and forward Travis Roy's paralyzing injury 11 seconds into his college career in October 1995.

Last May, Parker turned down the Boston Bruins' coaching job. He had declined the job once before, in 1991, but he admits that he gave the more recent offer serious thought until he was visited by a former Terrier, Kaj Linna of Finland. "I realized how much I enjoy the relationship I have with former players, the guy who is 35 years old now," Parker says. "It's a bond we have, and it would be hard to leave the friends I've made here."

"He's become more sensitive and more giving of his feelings," says Jacqueline. "He's much more open, and he lets people know the real Jack Parker."

Back at Harvard last November, the real Jack Parker reappeared, straightening his tie as he returned to the bench. He watched as Harvard scored a power-play goal on its two-minute, two-man advantage to narrow the score to 4-2, and afterward he told reporters that his tirade had been uncalled for. "I take full responsibility for them scoring that goal," he said. "I put my players in a tough spot, and I told them it was my fault."
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/vau...2286/index.htm

Sources:
http://www.insidecollegehockey.com/7...aches_0203.htm
http://slapshot.blogs.nytimes.com/20...ter-to-listen/

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12-31-2011, 06:52 AM
  #225
VanIslander
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Note:

Jack Kelley mentored Jack Parker for years, hence Kelley as head coach and Parker as assistant, despite the latter's more impressive career. There is evidence that Kelley had more coaching talent, as "The Mentor" is raved about a lot more, including by Parker himself, who adopts the elder's coaching philosophy. Parker became an assistant coach initially after captaining the team to two Frozen Four championship tourneys as a player. Parker the player was renowned for adopting coach Kelley's defense-first mentality and commitment to hard work and training and Parker the coach continued the tradition for years, before becoming less regimental in his later years.

These two coaches are responsible for the legacy of success at Boston University. The Terriers had a hockey program since 1918 but didn't win its first regular season conference title or its first NCAA title until these two coaches were at the helm, which has been for the last half century (1963-2011). They have been to the Frozen Four tourney an eye-popping seventeen times. THEY MADE BU TERRIERS ELITE!

Thanks to these two coaches, BU is now in the same class as college greats Michigan, Denver, Boston College, Minnesota, Wisconsin and North Dakota.

Kelley went on to coach a WHA championship team; Parker twice turned down the head coaching job for the Boston Bruins. They have demonstrated enough talent and career success to suggest they could have been all-time greats at the highest level of competition, minimizing the obvious question mark.



NCAA Tournament Champions
1971, 1972, 1978, 1995, 2009

Conference Tournament Champions
1972, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1986, 1991, 1994, 1995, 1997, 2006, 2009

Conference Regular Season Champions
1965, 1967, 1971, 1976, 1978, 1979, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 2000, 2006, 2009

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