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Opinions on the WHA's reputation?

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Old
12-29-2011, 05:16 PM
  #26
Hot Water Bottle
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Originally Posted by Big Phil View Post
Not to mention, God bless Bobby Hull and such, but in his last NHL season prior to the WHA he had 50 goals and 93 points which was good for 6th in the NHL. He was 33 years old and like anyone else he was starting to decline a tad. In the WHA he scored 77 goals and 142 points one year. A little bit of a discrepancy?
Stats like these make me wonder if goalies could have had worse stats to compensate for this. I am curious: did the WHA have exactly the same game rules as the NHL or did they tweak the rules to emphasize offense?

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12-29-2011, 05:31 PM
  #27
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Originally Posted by Boyfriend of Sara View Post
Stats like these make me wonder if goalies could have had worse stats to compensate for this. I am curious: did the WHA have exactly the same game rules as the NHL or did they tweak the rules to emphasize offense?
I'm not sure if they did anything specific or not. But it is a trickle down effect. If your goalies and defense are worse your forwards (which are a notch down from NHL level to start with) will be the beneficiaries and they were because there shouldn't have been a serious league in the world that had Mike Walton lead them in points.

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12-29-2011, 05:36 PM
  #28
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Originally Posted by Boyfriend of Sara View Post
Stats like these make me wonder if goalies could have had worse stats to compensate for this. I am curious: did the WHA have exactly the same game rules as the NHL or did they tweak the rules to emphasize offense?
Not aware of any big rule differences. I think what happened was that some pretty good offensive players like Tardiff & Walton were given more opportunity to go for it.

Regarding Bobby Hull, he hadn't slowed down a whole lot. At age 37 in the 76 Canada Cup he potted more goals than anyone else on Team Canada. He also had the opportunity to play with a couple of pretty good Swedes in Ulf Nilsson & Anders Hedberg. One of the best forward lines of all time who revolutionized the North American game. Glen Sather used the WHA Winnipeg Jet style of play with the Oilers of the 80's.

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12-29-2011, 06:01 PM
  #29
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Originally Posted by voyageur View Post
As I understood it, it was the connections Ferguson had with Serge Savard and Molsons which got Winnipeg endorsed by the Molsons brewery, as they became a major sponsor of the Jets, and thus gave us an ally to defend our entry into the NHL. Could you explain this premise?
there was no individual sponsorship deals, as far as entry to the NHL. the deal was for a bloc of WHA teams or for nothing. Winnipeg had no special deal, though Molson did have a sponsorship deal with their arena. In spite of their deal with the Jet's arena the Molsons still originally voted against merging the leagues.

originally the vote by NHL governors to accept a merger was defeated despite a clear majority favoring the merge. it was a 12-5 vote in favour, but 13 votes were needed to pass the merger. Boston and LA voted against the merger as well as all 3 existing Canadian NHL teams (Montreal, Toronto, and Vancouver.) None of the Canadian teams wanted to share the CBC/ Molson's sponsorship revenue.

When the block was announced Oiler fans reacted immediately with a boycott of Molson products. Winnipeggers downplayed their existing arena sponsorship deal and soon joined in the boycott along with Nordiques fans. Hockey fans across Canada soon also joined the boycott. This really hurt the bottom line for Molson's. Molson executives realized that consumers outside of Montreal and Toronto would never forgive them if they blocked a merger and ended professional hockey in the prairies and Quebec city.they then reached a deal with the 3 Canadian WHA teams to be the exclusive beer supplier for their arenas, and one would have to be seriously non-cynical to think it wasn't payment for their vote.

A second vote held weeks later passed due to Vancouver and Montreal changing their votes and supporting the deal. Vancouver was swayed by the savings of travel and a more balanced schedule.


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12-29-2011, 06:05 PM
  #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Big Phil View Post
Well just some food for thought:
Mike Walton NHL stats - 448 points in 588 games
WHA stats - 281 points in 211 games

Led the WHA in goals and points in 1974.
The NHL leader in goals and points in 1974 was Phil Esposito, I know I can see the difference

Walton never had more than 30 goals in an NHL season. Never had more than 66 points either. He jumped from 47 points in the NHL in 1973 to 117 in the WHA in 1974. I would have tested him for steroids if I didn't already know that the pool of talent in the WHA was much, much thinner.

Robbie Ftorek NHL stats - 227 points in 334 games
WHA stats - 523 points in 373 games

Had 4 100 point seasons in the WHA. Once had a 73 point season in the NHL. Then 51. Then 41.

But if you don't want to believe me check this out, scored three times as many goals in the WHA as he did in the NHL in pretty much the same number of games. Keep in mind, he was 27 when he returned to the NHL, right in what should have been his prime.

Assist leader in the WHA in 1979 - Ftorek
Assist leader in the NHL in 1979 - Trottier

Who was better?

Marc Tardif NHL leader in goals and points in 1978
Guy Lafleur NHL leader in goals and points in 1978

Tardif career high 154 points in WHA. Followed by 149 and 109.
Tardif career high 70 points in the NHL, followed by 68 and 54.

Yes, between the ages of 24-30 he was in the WHA but should there really be that much of a spike for most of your prime years?

Not to mention, God bless Bobby Hull and such, but in his last NHL season prior to the WHA he had 50 goals and 93 points which was good for 6th in the NHL. He was 33 years old and like anyone else he was starting to decline a tad. In the WHA he scored 77 goals and 142 points one year. A little bit of a discrepancy?

In 1978 in the WHA he had 117 points. Two years later back in the NHL, his last season, he had 17 points in 27 games, good for maybe 50 points if he's healthy.

Like I said before, the WHA did some nice things OFF the ice for the game. We don't have the Oilers dynasty without the WHA. But it was a far inferior league to the NHL. Case in point, the 1976 Canada Cup. Everyone selected on Team Canada was from the NHL except for Hull and Tardif - who was cut. If that doesn't tell you where the talent was distributed in the hockey world, nothing will
The differences for these 3 guys are not as great as you make them out to be either, you are comparing WHA peak and prime years of careers with early and aging parts of their careers.

Tardif being 2nd in that 2rd period in PPG for his age group gives a more fair comp.

Sure all 3 guys would be a little bit less in the NHL in terms of production but at least give a fair comparison.

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12-29-2011, 06:25 PM
  #31
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The WHA was created in the era of pre-corporate sports. People should not forget that NHL players used to hold down jobs in the real world during the off season to make ends meet.
The biggest problem was that the WHA really did not have any business model and the league never created any feeling of being in the game for the long haul. Most of the teams were poorly capitalised by otherwise wealthy owners who had never been in the hockey business. By the time WHA hockey was a quality product there were few if any franchises of value left.
The WHA did open the door to more expansion of the NHL into Canadian markets and into the US Sunbelt.
The WHA did help to modernise hockey labour laws for the players who built the game getting them better salaries and working conditions.
The WHA failed miserably in the end, but it really did help to change hockey for the better.

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12-29-2011, 06:55 PM
  #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hardyvan123 View Post
The differences for these 3 guys are not as great as you make them out to be either, you are comparing WHA peak and prime years of careers with early and aging parts of their careers.

Tardif being 2nd in that 2rd period in PPG for his age group gives a more fair comp.

Sure all 3 guys would be a little bit less in the NHL in terms of production but at least give a fair comparison.
No, I am showing that three players who did not do anything special in the NHL were able to become superstars in the WHA. Ftorek came back to the NHL when he was 27. Since when is 27 years old past someone's prime? And Walton was 28 when he left the NHL to the WHA. He had about 8 seasons to do something great in the NHL on great teams and he peaks at 30 goals. Then he jets to the WHA the next season and is a 117 point man. That isn't enough proof?

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12-29-2011, 08:04 PM
  #33
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Originally Posted by Big Phil View Post
No, I am showing that three players who did not do anything special in the NHL were able to become superstars in the WHA. Ftorek came back to the NHL when he was 27. Since when is 27 years old past someone's prime? And Walton was 28 when he left the NHL to the WHA. He had about 8 seasons to do something great in the NHL on great teams and he peaks at 30 goals. Then he jets to the WHA the next season and is a 117 point man. That isn't enough proof?
Ftorek has the weakest case of the 3 but Tardif had the 2nd PPG average for players aged 30-31, including his 1st year back and the year before and after that. Walton was close to a PPG player aged 31-33 which puts him 5th among players aged 30 and over.

http://www.hockey-reference.com/play...oints_per_game

So let's stop this cherry picking of stats shall we.

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12-29-2011, 11:31 PM
  #34
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Originally Posted by Hardyvan123 View Post
Ftorek has the weakest case of the 3 but Tardif had the 2nd PPG average for players aged 30-31, including his 1st year back and the year before and after that. Walton was close to a PPG player aged 31-33 which puts him 5th among players aged 30 and over.

http://www.hockey-reference.com/play...oints_per_game

So let's stop this cherry picking of stats shall we.
I think that's the third time you've said that about Tardif. So a guy has the second best PPG for players aged 30-31 in that particular season? Man that's really digging hard to find something. Walton was 5th among players in PPG aged 30 and over after he came back. No offense, but if that's the best argument for your case it's still very weak.

How about the fact that Walton was on the 1972 Bruins one of the most offensive teams to ever play and he had 56 points. This was in a full season, with Bobby Orr and he was right in his prime at 27 years old.

Walton was a fine player, maybe a good player if you want to call it that. Not a very good player and certainly not a great player. A serviceable player is what I would call him. We shouldn't act like had he been in the NHL for those three seasons that he'd have lit it up. Because he didn't before OR after.

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12-30-2011, 04:18 AM
  #35
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The WHA was garbage hockey - most teams had 3 or 4 NHL-calibre players (and mostly journeymen at that) surrounded by 15 AHLers - which helped to dilute the quality of the sport to a ridiculous extent. In terms of quality of play, the mid-1970s are the darkest period in hockey history.

Because the teams were so thin and the players so poor, it led to the rise of goon hockey as teams filled out their rosters with no-talent fighters in an attempt to use violence as a marketing tool in new markets.

That said, there were definitely some positives - player compensation left the dark ages of the original 6 era, and it definitely helped spread the game tio some new markets. Also contributed to the growth of the sport in Canada.

Biggest impact was that it spurred the NHL to innovate and get out of the stone age in many respects. The success of the sport in the 1980s to the present is in large part a result of this.

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12-30-2011, 04:32 AM
  #36
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Originally Posted by Big Phil View Post
I think that's the third time you've said that about Tardif. So a guy has the second best PPG for players aged 30-31 in that particular season? Man that's really digging hard to find something. Walton was 5th among players in PPG aged 30 and over after he came back. No offense, but if that's the best argument for your case it's still very weak.

How about the fact that Walton was on the 1972 Bruins one of the most offensive teams to ever play and he had 56 points. This was in a full season, with Bobby Orr and he was right in his prime at 27 years old.

Walton was a fine player, maybe a good player if you want to call it that. Not a very good player and certainly not a great player. A serviceable player is what I would call him. We shouldn't act like had he been in the NHL for those three seasons that he'd have lit it up. Because he didn't before OR after.
Prime has nothing to do with age.

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12-30-2011, 07:46 AM
  #37
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The dilution of talent argument was one of the recurring themes back in those times. One of the results was that the old model of player development was over.
Pat Price and Dennis Sobchuk became the WHA's "million dollar babies", jumping directly from junior to pro without any apprenticeship period in the minors. Young promising players had for the first time unprecedented leverage. The WHA introduced the "Baby Bulls" and Nelson Skalbania managed to lure Wayne Gretzky and Mark Messier to play in Indianapolis.
The era of the the career minor league player died with the WHA. All those career AHL players jumping to the WHA created a talent vacuum.
The talent vacuum for better or worse forced teams to look for alternative sources of talent. This helped introduce youngsters, Europeans and college players into the higher level pro ranks. None of this was systematic or planned, but it did change hockey.

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12-30-2011, 01:50 PM
  #38
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Prime has nothing to do with age.
You don't find it strange that Walton goes directly from a 50ish point man to a 117 point man the next season? You can pretty much say he had some prime years in the NHL and didn't do a whole lot. But go to the WHA where you remove the 30 or 40 guys who had more points than you in the NHL and all of the sudden...........you're Herb Cain in 1944, only better.

I'm sorry, but best impact the WHA made was off the ice. On the ice I think it can be agreed that the Winnipeg Jets get their lunch handed to them by the 1970s Habs.

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12-30-2011, 04:31 PM
  #39
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For a competing sports league the WHA had remarkable longevity.
Garry Davidson who helped found the WHA tried much the same thing with World Football League. The WFL lasted one season and bit of the second season. The USFL didnt last very long and Vince McMahon's XFL lasted all of year. So in context, that the WHA lasted 7 years is probably an amazing feat. The WFL tried the same WHA formula of signing high profile NFL'ers like Larry Csonka and Kenny Stabler to big money contract. That sort of template did not work in football and the WFL folded part way into the 1975 season.
The WHA teams in NHL markets either had lousy rink leases like the New York Raiders, or played in decrepit and inadequate facilities like the Philadelphia Blazers and the Chicago Cougars. There was a great deal of buzz at the time about the Minnesota Fighting Saints playing in a modern futuristic arena with plexiglass see through boards. The Winnipeg Jets were playing out of an arena built in the early 1950's and deemed obsolete for pro hockey standards soon after it was built.
The WHA managed to do a great deal of damage to junior hockey in places like Winnipeg, Edmonton, Calgary and Quebec City. Pilfering young junior hockey talent robbed the junior leagues of their box office stars and the WHA was not big on paying development money.

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12-30-2011, 04:51 PM
  #40
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Originally Posted by MS View Post
The WHA was garbage hockey - most teams had 3 or 4 NHL-calibre players (and mostly journeymen at that) surrounded by 15 AHLers - which helped to dilute the quality of the sport to a ridiculous extent. In terms of quality of play, the mid-1970s are the darkest period in hockey history.

Because the teams were so thin and the players so poor, it led to the rise of goon hockey as teams filled out their rosters with no-talent fighters in an attempt to use violence as a marketing tool in new markets.

That said, there were definitely some positives - player compensation left the dark ages of the original 6 era, and it definitely helped spread the game tio some new markets. Also contributed to the growth of the sport in Canada.

Biggest impact was that it spurred the NHL to innovate and get out of the stone age in many respects. The success of the sport in the 1980s to the present is in large part a result of this.
I'm not so sure. If the WHA was "garbage" and they only had a handful of NHL caliber players how come the Winnipeg Jets held their own in the 1976 Izvestia Tournament in Moscow playing the Soviet, Czech, Swedish and Finnish National teams (the Jets went 1-2-1.) Or New England whipping the Soviet Nationals 5-2 on December 27, 1976? Or in January 1977 the Quebec Nordiques plastering the Soviet Nationals 6-1 and becoming the only pro team to drive Tretiak from the net in a game? In that same 1976-77 tour the Soviets (the best team on the planet) only beat Cincinnati 7-5, Edmonton 3-2, Winnipeg 3-2, and San Diego 6-3 (they lead 4-3 with 5 minutes to go.) Their only big wins were 5-2 over Indianapolis and 10-1 over Houston. And in the Houston game the score was 2-1 midway through the 2nd period when Bill Dineen lifted Ron Grahame for Wayne Rutledge. The Soviets scored 7 goals in 9 minutes against Rutledge. So that score is a bit miss-stated.

If what you said was true the Soviets, who the very best versions of Team Canada struggled to beat, should have plastered the WHA teams? And yet they did not. How come?

Craig

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12-30-2011, 06:00 PM
  #41
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The WHA is one of the most important events in the history of the game. Because of the new league, the NHL had to do away with the reserve clause and the owners had to pay players their market value. Playing hockey could now not only get you paid, but you got paid well. Also, the WHA is why player can now enter the league at age 18. Before the WHA, the NHL had an agreement with the CHL that only allowed players to be promoted to the pros at the age of 20. Teams in the WHA would routinely sign top junior player to big contracts at 18, leading to the NHL changing its deal with the CHL, and allowing 18yo to play in the league.

While not everything the WHA did was good, the league and the players are better off because of its brief existence.
you put it perfectly

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12-30-2011, 08:14 PM
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You don't find it strange that Walton goes directly from a 50ish point man to a 117 point man the next season? You can pretty much say he had some prime years in the NHL and didn't do a whole lot. But go to the WHA where you remove the 30 or 40 guys who had more points than you in the NHL and all of the sudden...........you're Herb Cain in 1944, only better.

I'm sorry, but best impact the WHA made was off the ice. On the ice I think it can be agreed that the Winnipeg Jets get their lunch handed to them by the 1970s Habs.
Mike Walton is an interesting case. Anybody who watched him play could tell that he had the skillset to be a star. Unfortunately, he was a streaky player who tended to be one dimensional and never was put into a position to excel until he went to the WHA. Started off with the Leafs but didn't really fit in with the Imlach style of play. By the time he got to Boston, their power play & first 2 lines were set so he really didn't get much chance to show off his offensive skills. 56 points was pretty good for a 3rd line guy, with little power play time & limited ice time. In the WHA, he got the ice time & was allowed to be the offensive player he was. No surprise that he had a great season.

What is perplexing is the WHA guys who put in better seasons when they returned to the NHL. Mike Rogers best WHA season was 83 points but he put up 3 straight 100+ seasons when he joined the NHL. Blaine Stoughton put up his best goals season with 56 when he came back to the NHL. I won't even mention Gretzky.

How can this be? they went to a better league but their numbers went up.

I am not really sure overall which league was better. Sure the NHl had great teams like the Canadiens & Flyers but they got to play against the Washington capitols & the Kansas City Scouts. The NHL was a very unbalanced league at the time.

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12-30-2011, 08:26 PM
  #43
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The WHA achieved enough legitimacy to have its four strongest franchises merge with the NHL and to basically force the relocation of the Atlanta Flames to Calgary. The Flames were for a brief period of time owned by Nelson Skalbania of Indianapolis Racers fame.
It is easy enough to dismiss the WHA as a total failure, but the NHL wound up with lousy franchises due to the Cleveland/Minnesota merger, the Kansas City Scouts, the Colorado Rockies and Atlanta Flames. So not all was well and happy in NHL hockey land at the time either.
1970's hockey was not that great, true enough. Lots of dump and chase, line brawls and players with moustaches and long sideburns.
The WHA brought back the minor league tradition of the playing coach with Pat "Whitey" Stapleton and Johnny "Pie"McKenzie. Fiery Phil Watson gave players "bag skates" after a loss. Billy "The Fox" Dineen was a terrific student of the game. Rudy Pilous was a great speaker and had a wonderful hat collection.
The WHA for all of its flaws really helped make hockey fun again.

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12-30-2011, 09:07 PM
  #44
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Mike Walton is an interesting case. Anybody who watched him play could tell that he had the skillset to be a star. Unfortunately, he was a streaky player who tended to be one dimensional and never was put into a position to excel until he went to the WHA. Started off with the Leafs but didn't really fit in with the Imlach style of play. By the time he got to Boston, their power play & first 2 lines were set so he really didn't get much chance to show off his offensive skills. 56 points was pretty good for a 3rd line guy, with little power play time & limited ice time. In the WHA, he got the ice time & was allowed to be the offensive player he was. No surprise that he had a great season.
Ya, Walton was a piece of work as a Junior with St. Mikes & the Neil McNeil Maroons along with the Marlies in Toronto, going on to win Rookie of the Year honors in the CPHL & then AHL along with a Calder in Rochester. He didnt crack the Leafs line-up full-time until 67-68, used as Power Play Specialist seeing limited action in 65-66 & 66-67, helping them win their last Cup. He was ridden hard by Imlach who didnt much care for players that came of age in the 60's, cutting him up for his play, criticizing him for his haircut, clothes, whatever, and just generally making life unbelievably unpleasant for a guy who had Superstar abilities.

Walton married a Smythe, I believe Staffords Niece, so he was sort of part of ownership further infuriating Imlach & to top it off, had Eagleson as his Agent/Lawyer & friend. Like Mahovlich, Walton became so depressed he started seeing a Psychiatrist who finally convinced the Leafs that theyd best be trading him or he might be done, so they packed him off to Philly along with Bruce Gamble. One guy with a tricky ticker who wound up having a coronary in-game (but finished it) and another who'd been broken by Drill Sargent Imlach, like poor old Vincent D'onofrio in Full Metal Jacket. Best up & coming Sniper in the Leafs Platoon destroyed early, never achieving what he couldve.


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12-30-2011, 09:14 PM
  #45
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Mike Walton is an interesting case all right.
Shakey has a falling out with Leafs management.
His player agent was Alan Eagleson who also doubled as executive director of the NHLPA. Walton got a fairly rich 3 year $450K contact to play for the WHA Minnesota Fighting Saints.
Fair enough, but we are talking about an era when pro contracts paid about $25K a year and the WHA could barely meet its weekly payroll.
Pretty amazing that Eagleson could have clients in both leagues as an agent and be the head of the NHLPA.
Shakey did ok for himself.

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12-30-2011, 10:32 PM
  #46
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Mike Walton is an interesting case all right.
Shakey has a falling out with Leafs management.
His player agent was Alan Eagleson who also doubled as executive director of the NHLPA. Walton got a fairly rich 3 year $450K contact to play for the WHA Minnesota Fighting Saints.
As I mentioned earlier, my Wife worked for the Minnesota Fighting Saints. She hand delivered Walton's first check to Eagleson. When she knocked on the hotel room door, he answered it in his underwear. She handed him the check and immediately turned and left.

The book, EAGLESON The Fall of a HOCKEY CZAR, makes for some good reading.

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12-30-2011, 11:12 PM
  #47
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As I mentioned earlier, my Wife worked for the Minnesota Fighting Saints. She hand delivered Walton's first check to Eagleson. When she knocked on the hotel room door, he answered it in his underwear. She handed him the check and immediately turned and left.
Classy huh?. And I wonder just how much Mike actually ever saw of those cheques...

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12-30-2011, 11:29 PM
  #48
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I think that's the third time you've said that about Tardif. So a guy has the second best PPG for players aged 30-31 in that particular season? Man that's really digging hard to find something. Walton was 5th among players in PPG aged 30 and over after he came back. No offense, but if that's the best argument for your case it's still very weak.

How about the fact that Walton was on the 1972 Bruins one of the most offensive teams to ever play and he had 56 points. This was in a full season, with Bobby Orr and he was right in his prime at 27 years old.

Walton was a fine player, maybe a good player if you want to call it that. Not a very good player and certainly not a great player. A serviceable player is what I would call him. We shouldn't act like had he been in the NHL for those three seasons that he'd have lit it up. Because he didn't before OR after.
Actually for Tardif it included 3 seasons, his first season back and the one before and after and I also included guys 1 year younger than him as well.

Did you even look at the list?

I didn't dig, I just checked more relevant stats.

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12-30-2011, 11:39 PM
  #49
Hardyvan123
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pappyline View Post
Mike Walton is an interesting case. Anybody who watched him play could tell that he had the skillset to be a star. Unfortunately, he was a streaky player who tended to be one dimensional and never was put into a position to excel until he went to the WHA. Started off with the Leafs but didn't really fit in with the Imlach style of play. By the time he got to Boston, their power play & first 2 lines were set so he really didn't get much chance to show off his offensive skills. 56 points was pretty good for a 3rd line guy, with little power play time & limited ice time. In the WHA, he got the ice time & was allowed to be the offensive player he was. No surprise that he had a great season.

What is perplexing is the WHA guys who put in better seasons when they returned to the NHL. Mike Rogers best WHA season was 83 points but he put up 3 straight 100+ seasons when he joined the NHL. Blaine Stoughton put up his best goals season with 56 when he came back to the NHL. I won't even mention Gretzky.

How can this be? they went to a better league but their numbers went up.

I am not really sure overall which league was better. Sure the NHl had great teams like the Canadiens & Flyers but they got to play against the Washington capitols & the Kansas City Scouts. The NHL was a very unbalanced league at the time.
Good post and I'll add that Walton had emotional issues in the form of a mental illness, we don't know when his good and bad times were and if the atmosphere in the different leagues affected his mental moods either.

The truth be told the WHA had less overall talent but some of the players did quite well converting to the NHL, Blaine Stoughton and Mike Rogers are prime examples.

Someone once said that the WHA was about 75% of what the NHL was and that sounds likes it's in the right range although it varied from year to year.

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Old
12-30-2011, 11:40 PM
  #50
Trottier
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Just want to thank the posters on this thread for reviving some brain cells of mine that have not been exercised for many decades. Some of the long-forgotten names you are evoking are mind-boggling.

Denis Sobchuk?

Rick Jodzio?

Holy shazoo!

(What no Gerry Odrowski? )

Quote:
Originally Posted by Boyfriend of Sara View Post
Stats like these make me wonder if goalies could have had worse stats to compensate for this. I am curious: did the WHA have exactly the same game rules as the NHL or did they tweak the rules to emphasize offense?
Allowed the two line pass (red line) long before the NHL adopted it. Forced the penalty killing team to cross its own blueline before "icing" the puck, otherwise it was called back for a faceoff in their zone. (I actually like that rule).

Some funny trivia: the WHA puck was actually colored dark blue. They originally toyed around with the idea of a red puck, but needless to say, goaltenders would not consent.

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