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The 2011 Undrafteds Thread

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Old
01-08-2012, 09:17 AM
  #76
Rob Scuderi
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D Josef Horesovsky

Quote:
One of the strongest defensemen in Czeckosovakian hockey. Was a physical player, a hard-hitter with a wickedly strong shot on goal.
http://www.chidlovski.com/personal/1...c/cssrbiod.htm
IIHF WC All Stars '68

Czechoslovakian Elite League: Poldi Kladno ('64-'65), Sparta Prague ('65-'69, '71-'76), Dukla Jihlava ('69-'71), Motor Ceske Budejovice ('76-'77), League Gold '70, '71, scored 83 goals in 514 games.

National team: WC '68-'73; Olympics '68, '72; WC Gold '72; scored 23 goals in 152 games for Czechoslovakia.

D Michael Thelven

100 pts in 207 NHL GP
66pts in 162 SEL GP
7pts in 14 CC GP
4pts in 3 OG GP
2 pts in 10 WC GP
TOI ranks in NHL: 3,4,5
x2 Swedish World All-Star Team

x1 OG Bronze
x1 Canada Cup silver
x1 Canada Cup bronze

Quote:
Originally Posted by LoH
Defenceman Michael Thelvin played over 200 games for the Boston Bruins in the late 1980s. He was mobile and made crisp passes while playing a chippy brand of hockey in his own end.

The Stockholm native played seven years with the local Djurgardens club. The talented backliner also represented his country at the 1984 Sarajevo Olympics, the 1985 World Championships, and the Canada Cup in 1984 and 1987. He was taken 186th overall by the Boston Bruins in the 1980 Entry Draft but remained in Europe for several years. The gifted defender was named to the Swedish World all-star team in 1984 and 1985.

Thelven joined Boston in 1985-86 and was a creative playmaker for four full seasons. He was an asset on the power play and had a nasty streak that came out on occasion. The slick Swede was a key player for Boston when it reached the 1988 Stanley Cup finals. Thelven's mobility and ability to clear the puck out of his zone also made him a useful penalty killer. He retired after playing six games in 1989-90.

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01-08-2012, 10:09 PM
  #77
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LW Lars-Goran Nilsson

390 pts in 284 Swedish Division 1 GP(precursor to SEL)
140 pts in 141 SEL GP
43 pts in 52 WC GP
7 pts in 13 OG GP
x3 Swedish All-Star Team
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eliteprospects
Growing up in Vuollerim (4 mil south of Jokkmokk) and had a local sports club as the parent club. Where the fantastic nickname "Whirlwind from Vuollerim". When he first down to Brynäs so was his nickname "crusher ore from Kiruna".

One of Sweden's most witty hockey players under 60 - and 70's. Games always with an extremely short stick mostly due to its low-riding style. Nilsson was one of the prime movers in the locker room during Gävle team's glory days.

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01-09-2012, 01:06 AM
  #78
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RW Ken Houston

328 pts in 570 GP
19 pts in 35 playoff GP
x6 20 goals
x2 50 points

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockeydraftcentral
Converted from defense to right wing for his rookie year. ... Made a name for himself as rookie when he fought with Philadelphia's Dave Schultz, injuring Schultz's jaw and forcing him out of a gam
Quote:
Originally Posted by Calgary Sun
Soft spoken, level-headed, unassuming.

Ken Houston was a big, quiet guy who went about his business, often effectively, of patrolling a wing for the Atlanta and Calgary Flames.

An honest, 20-goal scorer.

But when push came to punch, the 6-ft., 2-in, 210-pounder could deliver with the best of them.

And one of the first punches the native and present resident of Chatham, Ont., threw gave him instant fistic prowess in a league sprinkled with menacing heavyweights.

Just days after donning an Atlanta jersey, he broke the jaw of highly-regarded Philadelphia Flyers tough guy Dave 'The Hammer' Schultz.

"It was right after I'd scored my first goal," recounts Houston, during a telephone interview. "He was my check and after the faceoff, we went back down into the Philly end and were buzzing the net.

"Play stopped and he seemed to take offence that I'd scored my first goal against him. There was a lot of yipping and pretty soon it was time to do something about it ... and the gloves were off."

The bout went for several minutes.

"The linesmen started moving in between us and he was still yapping so I reached around and hit him again. I don't know if that's the one that did it or not."

Houston played seven of his nine seasons in the NHL with the Flames, scoring 128 of his 162 goals and collecting 516 of his 624 penalty minutes.

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01-09-2012, 01:21 AM
  #79
TheDevilMadeMe
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I realize why he wasn't drafted, but Jim Carey, G is not only the last 1st Team All Star remaining, he's also the only 2-time Vezina finalist remaining. In Carey's rookie season (1994-95), he was 3rd in both Vezina and All-Star voting. In his second year, he won the Vezina and was a 1st Team All-Star. Then his lack of lateral movement was exposed in the playoffs and he quickly lost his confidence.

A two-time Vezina finalist should be selected by now even though he literally did nothing else, right?

I believe Paul Bibeault (1944 product of the War), Mario Lessard (1981), Steve Mason (2009) and Pekka Rinne (2010) are the only 2nd Team All-Stars remaining. Rinne was mentioned up thread though.

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01-09-2012, 01:25 AM
  #80
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I believe Mike McMahon, D is the only defenseman available who received multiple votes for the Norris in a year. He finished 8th in 1967-68. Had trouble sticking in the league otherwise though, so maybe there's a reason he wasn't drafted.

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01-11-2012, 02:20 AM
  #81
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bring Back Scuderi View Post
D Josef Horesovsky


http://www.chidlovski.com/personal/1...c/cssrbiod.htm
IIHF WC All Stars '68

Czechoslovakian Elite League: Poldi Kladno ('64-'65), Sparta Prague ('65-'69, '71-'76), Dukla Jihlava ('69-'71), Motor Ceske Budejovice ('76-'77), League Gold '70, '71, scored 83 goals in 514 games.

National team: WC '68-'73; Olympics '68, '72; WC Gold '72; scored 23 goals in 152 games for Czechoslovakia.

D Michael Thelven

100 pts in 207 NHL GP
66pts in 162 SEL GP
7pts in 14 CC GP
4pts in 3 OG GP
2 pts in 10 WC GP
TOI ranks in NHL: 3,4,5
x2 Swedish World All-Star Team

x1 OG Bronze
x1 Canada Cup silver
x1 Canada Cup bronze
I cant believe no one drafted Thelven. He is atleast AA standard and without looking at rosters I believe he could it on most teams in the AAA.

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01-11-2012, 11:45 AM
  #82
Iain Fyffe
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hedberg View Post
Dave Ritchie



I'm not sure he's actually a defender...
He was. IIRC he did play a bit of centre but was at least primarily a defenceman.

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01-11-2012, 11:44 PM
  #83
seventieslord
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Iain Fyffe View Post
He was. IIRC he did play a bit of centre but was at least primarily a defenceman.
When I got around to commenting on all these selections I was planning on mentioning he had one crazy outlier year where it appears he was a forward, but other than that was a defenseman.




watch this space, the first batch from my 365 is coming soon....

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01-12-2012, 04:54 PM
  #84
Iain Fyffe
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seventieslord View Post
When I got around to commenting on all these selections I was planning on mentioning he had one crazy outlier year where it appears he was a forward, but other than that was a defenseman.
Presumably you mean 1916/17...he was mainly a defenceman even that year. It was certainly fluky in terms of production, and he did play some wing that season, but he was not just a forward that season.

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01-12-2012, 07:06 PM
  #85
Nalyd Psycho
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From my research into the era, positions were fluid. Because teams usually had just 3 subs they used, and subbed one player at a time, it was very common for players to change role and position when a player was subbed. So even if a player starts each game at defence, doesn't mean he isn't averaging 10 minutes a game as a forward. So what I wonder is, who was their best bench player that year? Was he a defenceman?

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01-12-2012, 10:10 PM
  #86
Iain Fyffe
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Starters were Joe Malone (C), George Carey (RW), Rusty Crawford (LW), Joe Hall (P) and Dave Ritchie (CP).

Subs were Jack McDonald, Jack Marks, Skuli Jonsson and Walter Mummery. That's three forwards and one defenceman (Mummery), and of them McDonald got the most ice time by far, probably playing almost as much as Crawford and Carey. Having a full spare forward line and one spare blueliner (or sometimes 2 F and 1 D) was pretty standard at this time, and for a number of years afterward. NHA teams averaged closer to 9 men per game rather than 8 that season.

Ritchie started a couple of games at wing, and Crawford a couple of games at CP.

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01-13-2012, 03:17 PM
  #87
Iain Fyffe
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I should also say that while subs could be fairly fluid, substitutions were still infrequent enough that they were often specifically mentioned in game reports. Fluid subs had more to do with the sub - certain players were adept at playing multiple positions.

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01-14-2012, 02:08 AM
  #88
seventieslord
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VI - the thing about 365 picks in half a year was a joke, just wanted to give you a bit of a facewash in front of the net since you were probably pretty sure I'd hijack your thread

Rednal Sinav is not real. Look closely....

__________________________________

I have two coaches and a 38-man training camp roster coming. This includes about 30 players I have been working on for a week, which included a small handful of guys already mentioned in this thread. There are also a few here that were brought to my attention in this thread, that I found impossible to exclude.

These 38 picks represent, after heavy digging, what my shortlist would look like right now if we were having another draft. Basically I think it's the ultimate team that could be put together from the undrafted players, realizing of course, that your opinions may be different from mine...

Here is the first unit's worth of players:


Last edited by seventieslord: 01-14-2012 at 02:15 AM.
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01-14-2012, 02:09 AM
  #89
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Richard Smehlik, D



Smehlik was not an overly physical player, but he had great size (6'4, 222) and asserted himself well on the ice. He averaged 21.73 minutes per game in his 644-game NHL career, and was definitely the 2nd-best member of Buffalo's anonymous defense that played in front of Hasek (led by Zhitnik, of course). Smehlik was Buffalo's #2 defenseman based on ice time in six seasons, five of them to Zhitnik, the other to Bodger in his sophomore season. He was also their #1 in the lockout-shortened 1995 season.
As the 2nd-best defenseman on a conference finalist and a stanley cup finalist, Smehlik has an extensive playoff resume for a guy with 644 regular season games: 88 in the playoffs. He contributed to 8 straight playoff teams in his 8 seasons in Buffalo. As you know, they missed in 1996, but Smehlik missed that whole season recovering from surgery. Coincidence?

Smehlik received little PP time but averaged a decent 0.28 adjusted ESPPG. He killed a whopping 48% of penalties for teams that were 20% better than average on the kill. Obviously a lot of this credit has to go to Hasek, but a goalie alone cannot kill penalties, and no one helped him more than Smehlik during this time. He was three times their top PK defenseman, and two other times their #2. Only two other available defensemen can approach Smehlik's PK resume right now.

In terms of career average ice time, the quality of teams that used him that often, and the number of games that he did it for, Smehlik stands head and shoulders above other available modern defensemen.

Smehlik's offensive value was nothing to get excited about - merely adequate - so the ice time that his coaches gave him was more a result of defensive play than offense.

Smehlik played in 6 international tournaments, scoring 6 points in 39 games.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1998-99
Smehlik's skating is his strong suit... an agile skater with good laterl movement who is very solid on his skates.... good balance, tough to knock down... If given more offensive responsibility, he responds... has good passing skill and fair hockey vision... plays well at the point and has a rocket shot, but isn't clever enough with the puck to be a really effective member of the PP... can use his body but has to be more consistent and authoritative... not a mean hitter, prefers to use his stick to break up plays, and he does that effectively... plays a lot of minutes against top lines...
career TOI rankings: 3, 2, 1, 2, 2, 2, 2, 4, 2, 4.

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01-14-2012, 02:10 AM
  #90
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Billy Baird, D


In the Rockett Power bio from A2010, the defense duo's immense effect on their team's GAA in the 1910 OPHL was outlined. Baird's resume outside of the OPHL may not be as nice as Power's, nor as long, but he was a three-time all-star in three leagues: 1906 in the IHL, 1909 in the TPHL and 1910 in the OPHL. With baird, Galt won the 1911 OPHL title and the right to get their butts handed to them by the NHA Champion Senators.

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Trolley League
The difference seemed to be on defence where Billy Baird and Rocket Power of Waterloo formed an impenetrable wall to the Brantford forwards...

The Waterloo defence tandem of Baird and Power stood up the Brantford forwards for the second straight game as the Colts beat the Braves 6-3 for their third consecutive win...

The Berlin forwards, particularly Dumart and Frood had a tough time getting by the Waterloo defence pair of Billy Baird and Rocket Power..

Rocket Power and Billy Baird played another strong game for Waterloo completely shutting down Brantford‟s offence....

The play was clean throughout with the exception of one fight between Billy Baird of Waterloo and Oren Frood of the Dutchmen....

Billy Baird‟s play was solid despite playing the entire game with one eye completely swollen shut, the result of a collision with a stick in practice the previous day....

Tommy Smith with five goals and Billy Baird who played a strong defensive game were the stars for Galt....

Billy Baird made his first of many trips to the penalty box for checking too aggressively in the mind of the referees...

...teamed with Rocket Power to form the league‟s top defensive pairing. The duo formed an almost impenetrable defence for the Colts on many nights. With the turnover of the entire Waterloo team in 1911 due to the admission of Quebec into the NHA, Billy Baird left the Colts to anchor the Galt defence along with Ras Murphy. Baird was noted as a strong body checker, the “Ottawa Citizen” reported following Galt‟s 1911 Stanley Cup match against the Senators that Baird “had a knack of throwing a man into the boards with surprising speed and suddenness.”

John Cross is a testament to the difference that strong defensive play makes to a goalkeeper‟s statistics. In the first five games of the 1910 season Cross allowed an average of 8.46 goals against per game, but after the Colts signed Rocket Power and Billy Baird his average dropped to 4.67 goals against per game, second only to Hugh Lehman; the following season without the benefit of playing behind Power and Baird his goals against average ballooned back up to 8.23 on a weak Brantford team.

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Old
01-14-2012, 02:10 AM
  #91
seventieslord
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Lorne Ferguson, LW



Let me just point out that when Eddie Kullman was picked and I said he had the most pre-expansion GP among available players, I had missed Lorne Ferguson, who had 422. That's 79 more than Kullman, and 88 more than the next-highest available player (one upcoming pick excluded)

Just to stress again, when there are just 18 jobs for regular left wingers in the NHL and you can keep one for 422 games, that is an accomplishment, whether you excel in the NHL or are just a mediocre player.

Ferguson is a GP pick, I won't lie. I believe in O6 GP being an accomplishment in themselves, but there is more to him. For example, in 1955 he was 11th in goals with 20. He did not just toil on crap teams, he played 31 playoff games to go along with his 422 in the regular season. He was a cup finalist in 1956 with Detroit. And his short AHL career is pretty impressive, in the midst of a mid-career demotion, showing that he probably should never have been sent down:

- 1953: 11th in AHL points
- 1954: AHL goals leader, 6th in points. Names like Lewicki, Babando, Horvath, Parker MacDonald, McKenney and McIntyre trail him
- 1954: 2nd all-star team

Ferguson does not appear to have been in the NHL for his defense or physicality. He appears to be a middle of the road secondary scorer who stuck around for a while. The kind of guy who, if he had been 10 years younger, would have seen his career extended by expansion like so many others did.

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01-14-2012, 02:11 AM
  #92
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Darius Rusnak, C



Rusnak had a pretty good career domestically and internationally:

- 401 pts in 463 Czech elite league games from age 17-30
- 4th, 7th, 8th, 10th in Czech league scoring

- 189 pts in 169 Finnish league games from age 30-34
- 5th, 9th in Finnish league scoring

- 39 points in 57 International games
- tied for 4th in 1981 Canada Cup goals behind Bossy, Shepelev and Gretzky
- tied for 4th in 1983 worlds in goals behind Makarov, Krutov and Lala
- 9th in points at 1984 Olympics

But honestly, that doesn't really stand out that much. All these 70s/80s international players you guys have been mentioning, seem to just blend in with guys like Rusnak, and picking out who was the best is really tough.

But, I do think Rusnak in particular stands out, and here is why:

- He was captain of Czechoslovakia's national team for a while
- He was a factor in Czech golden hockey stick voting four times: 8th in 1981, 9th in 1983, 4th in 1984 and 9th in 1985. There is only a small handful of players available who even show up in that voting 2-3 times. This is the equivalent of Czech hart voting, and the fact that we have this information for the Czech league and not others, allows us to make more "educated guesses" than we can for Swedes and Finns.
- His accomplishments were mostly in the Czech league, which was at least the #2 league in Europe during the 80s, from what I can tell

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01-14-2012, 02:11 AM
  #93
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Tim Ecclestone, RW



Ecclestone had been creeping towards the top of my list for a while. I saw him as a decent two-way player, good offensively and defensively though not a standout.

I wish I had done more research previously, because I'd have definitely selected him. With 359 points, he was 11th among remaining players (5th in assists, by a winger that is awesome), and there are no 300-point players with PK resumes like him: 24% killed, 11% better than average. (no, that's not huge but all the very best PKers are long gone, and like I said, anyone with scoring ability remaining has little to no PK history). Overall he was a strong contributor to teams that were 5% better than average during his career. Plus what is written about him is pretty exemplary.

As such, as an overall player it quickly became clear to me that Ecclestone was the best NHLer available at RW.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 1970 hockey card
a better than average stickhandler...
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1972 hockey card
Tim is looked upon as a solid, two-way player. he can play all three forward positions but generally stays on the right side. Tim is a top-notch checker and relies on a hard wrist shot around the net. He's also a fine playmaker.
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1973 hockey card
Tim can play all three forward positions...
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1973 hockey card
one of the most versatile players in the NHL, Tim can play all three forward positions. He is also a tremendous checker, and can be assigned to shadow the opposition's top scorer.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1973
Hardworking RW who is considered one of the brightest prospects in the NHL even though he's never cracked the 20-goal barrier... handy guy to have around because he can play center and left wing as well as right and he can kill penalties as well...a good checking forward.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1974
strong skater who patrols the right wing effectively and delivers jarring checks... valuable guy because he knows how to check high-scoring left wings and is an expert penalty killer...

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01-14-2012, 02:13 AM
  #94
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Glen Hanlon, G



When selecting my four training camp goalies I was very careful with the NHL ones. I didn't want to get too caught up in one all-star team selection or Vezina nod, nor did I want to get overly excited about one good sv% season. I wanted long term sustained performance. A career long trend of exceeding the league average in sv% was a must, as was a a long period of maintenance of this average. Also, I am becoming a bigger believer in minutes played in a season, as that does a good job separating a good statistical season by a 40-game 1a goalie and a 55-game starter. all-star and norris recognition of any kind was also a consideration, but was just gravy.

Hanlon, with the 2nd-most games played among all available goalies with 477 (65th all-time), stood head and shoulders above the rest with a career average of 5 sv% points above the average. To find another goalie who averaged above the league average in their career at all, you have to go down to 92nd overall, a guy who played 90 fewer games. And the only goalie with more games

Highlights:

- 1979, was 7th in sv%
- 1980, was 4th in minutes
- 1984, was 5th in sv%, 8th in minutes, 8th in all-star voting
- 1987, was 4th in sv%
- 1988, was 8th in sv%, 9th in Vezina voting
- 1983, 1985, 1986, 1989, played 23-44 games at 3-19 points above the league sv% average

Another way to judge his performance, particularly because he's a 1980s goalie and they tended to share the crease rather well, is to look at the performance of the other goalies on his teams at the various stops in his career.

Vancouver, 1978-1982: Hanlon .880, others .879
New York, 1983-1986: Hanlon .887, others .878
Detroit, 1987-1991: Hanlon .884, others .877

So, on average Hanlon's teammate goaltenders were one sv% point below the league average, and he was five points over the average, and six points over them.

Despite a long string of 1st and 2nd round playoff exits, Hanlon was performing quite well, averaging 7 sv% points better than the league playoff average during his career.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Pelletier
Hanlon made it to Vancouver and the NHL to stay in 1978-79, but after three seasons he was unable to turn around the Canucks fortune. When the Canucks acquired "King" Richard Brodeur, Hanlon was reduced to backup and became expendable.

Late in the 1981-82 season Vancouver traded the still highly respected Hanlon to the St. Louis Blues for Rick Heinz, Tony Currie, Jim Nill and a draft pick. Many so called experts declared it a steal of a deal for the Blues, but the three players who went to Vancouver helped the Canucks in their Cinderella run to the Stanley Cup finals just weeks later.

Hanlon's stay in St. Louis was short as he was second fiddle to Mike Liut. He was traded to NY Rangers with Vaclav Nedmonasky for Andre Dore early in 1983. He spent the next two years as the number one goalie with an average Rangers team. His best season as a pro probably came in 1983-84 when he recorded 28 wins in 50 games while playing behind an injury riddled Rangers squad.

Hanlon fell out of favor in New York during the 1985-86 and actually spent some time in the minor leagues. The Rangers had a couple of hot goaltending prospects in John Vanbiesbrouck and Mike Richter coming along in their system, so the following year they ended up trading Glen to the Red Wings. For the next 5 years served as a capable keeper who at times was a backup, yet at other times served as the number one guy. He enjoyed a fine 1987-88 season when he recorded 22 wins in 47 games and shared the NHL lead for shutouts with 4.

Hanlon retired at the end of the 1991-92 season. In 1992-93 he returned to Vancouver as a goaltending coach and scout. Before long he was named as a full time assistant coach. This was the start of a long career in coaching, which includes stops on the top of the hockey world (NHL) and the unlikely (national team coach of both Belarus and Slovakia).

Hanlon is of course remembered for one thing more than any other - he is the guy who surrendered Wayne Gretzky's first NHL goal.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1980-1985 editions
enthusiastic but you wouldn't know it... rarely says a word on gameday to preserve concentration... one of the best young goalies around... a southpaw... has quick glove hand and great stickwork... also a fiery competitor... plays handball to keep reflexes sharp... rose from zero to hero in eyes of rangers fans in one year... jeers turned to cheers... :"Hanlon was red hot", says Devils' coach Tom McVie... made many sensational, seemingly impossible saves... has quick reflexes, agile footwork, uncanny sense of anticipation for location of opposing shots... had a solid season, considering all that was going on in front of him, but a disappointing playoff... calmed down from his intense, injury-filled early days in Vancouver. "I was so out of control that maybe it contributed to my injuries," he said...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1988-89
Hanlon has graduated from being a reflex goaltender to a standup one, and that's a big reason for his success the last two seasons. He uses his big body to block the puck, positioning himself well in the net and squaring himself to the puck. When he does this, he's successful.

Once he gets his feet moving is another story. He doesn't have good balance and once he opens up he's going to be on the ice. Glen will lose his balance once he moves his feet, so he often seems unready for the second save, but his innate quickness allows him to somehow recover and get his body in front of the shot. All of this could be avoided if he challenged a little more, as Hanlon is square to the puck from deep in his net instead of from farther out...

e clears rebounds fairly well... weak on his glove side on any shot below the waist, but is good above it... flops immediately on screen shots, but doesn't butterfly his pads... does well at maintaining his concentration within a game, but could improve between games... he has shown in the playoffs that he has his concentration down, so he can be more consistent in the regular season, too... he has always had the ability to make the big save... has always been a tough competitor...used to punish himself mentally when he allowed a goal... now looser in attitude, goals no longer distract him from doing his job... funny, upbeat and positive, a super team guy... teammates enjoy being around him because of his attitude.

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01-14-2012, 02:51 AM
  #95
TheDevilMadeMe
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VI's going to love the Smehlik pick.

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01-14-2012, 05:38 AM
  #96
VanIslander
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Originally Posted by TheDevilMadeMe View Post
VI's going to love the Smehlik pick.
A marginal top-3 defenseman in a 24+ team NHL on a below average blueline of a team that was at all successful due to goaltending, coaching, pinching and aggressive forechecking who saw #2 minutes overall based on his utility in multiple game situations, including both special teams, makes him a marginal not-bad 2000th overall pick, not an overlooked value.

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01-14-2012, 06:46 AM
  #97
Rob Scuderi
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LW Ted Bulley

214 pts in 414 GP
Minor Selke votes one year
1 AST vote one year
Quote:
Left-winger Ted Bulley spent eight years in the NHL with three different teams in the 1970s and '80s. He played a rugged style and stood his ground in front of the net which allowed him to score a fair number of goals.

The native of Windsor, Ontario played Tier II with his hometown Spitfires in 1972-73 then spent two years in the QMJHL with the Hull Festivals. He was chosen 115th overall by the Chicago Black Hawks in 1975 then spent a year in the IHL with the Flint Generals. Injuries ruined the 1976-77 for him but he returned to score 23 goals the next season.

The solid forward scored a personal-best 27 goals in 1978-79...He became more of a third line player for the Hawks and helped the club reach the semi-finals in 1982 before he was traded to the Washington Capitals.
C Dusan Pasek

330 pts in 372 Czech League GP
51 pts in 82 OG/WC/CC GP
x1 OG Silver
x1 WC Gold
x2 WC Silver
x1 WC Bronze
x3 Led team in scoring ('87 WC, '87 CC, '88 OG)
Tied for most goals in '88 Olympics
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kings of the Ice
Dusan Pasek was a high-enery, high-impact kind of hockey player. Although his greatest strength was scoring, he never won any league titles for it. Only in the 1986-87 season did he finally beat out the competition as the best passer but also as the bad guy of the league with his 81 penalty minutes in 38 matches...Pasek's debut on the national team came in 1982 during exhibition matches...One year later he was on his way to the World Championship. As a forward playing alongside Jiri Lala and xxx, he helped his team win a gold medal in Prague in 1985...He was captain of the national team in 1987-88 when he left for the NHL.
RW Lars-Gunnar Pettersson

453 pts in 495 SEL GP
26 pts in 39 OG/WC/CC GP
x1 SEL most points
x2 SEL most goals
x1 OG Bronze
x1 WC Gold
x1 WC Silver
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kings of the Ice
Every Swede knows that "L-G" is the nickname for outstanding forward Lars-Gunnar Pettersson-a player who gained fame in the 1980s as a great shooter...His best years were the late 80s...He played for 14 seasons in the Elite Series and accumulated 453 points: 271 goals plus 182 assists in 495 games...Pettersson played 117 games for Tre Kronor as well as 28 games for Sweden's second national team, the Vikings...his first game with Tre Kronor was against Finland in 1984 and his most memorable goal was the one he scored against Canada in 1987 at the Canada Cup.


Last edited by Rob Scuderi: 01-18-2012 at 09:13 PM.
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01-14-2012, 02:05 PM
  #98
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LW Paul Woods

Killed 44% of his team's penalties
4 years of minor Selke votes
196 pts in 501 GP
Captain of Red Wings in 78-79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Red Wings History
He arrived as part of an experiment and he still hasn't left.

The NHL waiver draft was inaugurated in the fall of 1977 and most NHL people chuckled when the Red Wings plopped down $50,000 to claim Paul Woods, a minor-league left-winger from the Montreal Canadiens farm system.

By the end of the 1977-78 season, many of the same people were calling it Detroit's best deal in years. Woods, who won two AHL Calder Cup titles with the Nova Scotia Voyageurs in 1975-76 and 1976-77, was a speedster on skates who was most effective in a checking role.

"He does so many things well, he sparks the club with his great attitude, intensity and will to win," Detroit coach Bobby Kromm said of his speedy rookie, who, skating on a line with Dale McCourt, produced 19-23-42 totals in 1977-78 and was voted Detroit's most exciting player.

"He skates so smooth and easy, just like a Montreal Canadien," said Wings GM Ted Lindsay, who forked out the $50,000 for Woods, calling it, "The best investment the team has made."

When Detroit ventured into the 1977-78 playoffs, Woods again shone, collecting a club rookie-record five assists and turning the head of a pretty knowledgeable hockey man. "My God, that Woods can skate," said Hall of Fame coach Toe Blake after watching his work as a checker against Canadiens star Guy Lafleur in the Stanley Cup playoffs.

His rookie numbers would stand as career highs for Woods, whose role evolved into a defensive specialist as his career continued.

"Woodsie was amazing," teammate Dennis Hextall said. "His worth wasn't in scoring 25-30 goals a season, it was his hustle. For all the assignments he got killing penalties as a first-year man, it really showed his value."

It was a role Woods cherished. "I enjoyed playing defense and killing penalties," he said. "It was exciting to go out in a tight situation and check. In junior, I was known strictly as an offensive player. Shows how you can change."

It was a switch Woods knew he'd have to make to be an NHLer. "My lifelong dream was to play in the NHL," he said. "And it was the only way I could play in the NHL. I didn't have an extraordinary shot or extraordinary skills like some other players. I just had to play hard all of the time."
http://redwings.nhl.com/club/page.htm?id=43850

C Eric Belanger

Quote:
Originally Posted by THN Forecaster
ASSETS: Has terrific hockey sense and on-ice awareness. Is defensively responsible and an excellent face-off man. Is gritty and a good example for younger players.
FLAWS: Is undersized and a bit fragile, so injuries can be a factor here. Hasn't produced numbers in the NHL that match his talent at lower levels.
CAREER POTENTIAL: Veteran checking center.
RW Rick Chartraw

x5 SC Winner (only played in 3 of them)
420 GP, 75 playoff GP
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pelletier
Chartraw not only played well in Kitchener; he excelled. In his final year the 6'2" 200lb defenseman scored 17 goals and 61 points in 70 games while accumulating 150 PIMs. Scouts were drooling over his size, his toughness, his mobility and his scoring abilities. The Montreal Canadiens drafted the Venezuelan born Chartraw 10th overall in the 1974 entry draft. Chartraw was selected ahead of Bryan Trottier, Mark Howe, Danny Gare and Tiger Williams, among others.

It took Chartraw 3 years before he cracked that incredibly deep Montreal blue line. In fact it's a testament to Chartraw's skill level and determination that he managed to make the team at all. With a blue line consisting of three future Hall of Famers in Guy Lapointe, Serge Savard and Larry Robinson, as well as youngsters such as John Van Boxmeer, Rod Langway and Brian Englbom, its hard to see how Chartraw saw any ice time at all...

At best he was a number 4 defenseman on this dynastic squad, but often was number 5 or 6. Sometimes he was even used on right wing! He was basically used in defensive situations, penalty killing and just for spotting the big three when they needed a break. His combination of size and strength and mobility made him a nice addition to the Habs. He never came close to fulfilling any offensive potential he had.

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01-14-2012, 02:15 PM
  #99
Rob Scuderi
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G Jack McCartan

Best Goalie at 1960 Olympics

Quote:
Originally Posted by LoH
Jack McCartan was the goaltender on the last U.S. team to have won the gold, back in 1960 in Squaw Valley, California prior to Lake Placid in 1980. The more recent edition of Team USA went on to defeat the Russians 4-3 and capture the "Miracle on Ice" gold medal with a win over Finland in their last game. And the 1960 version, with McCartan's stellar netminding, won the gold over much more highly favored teams from Canada, the Soviet Union and Czechoslovakia.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pelletier
After winning four games in the preliminary round, the upbeat American squad backed by the hometown fans passed their biggest test of the tournament by edging Canada, 2-1. McCartan was the difference, posting 39 saves.

Up next was the heavily favored Russians, yet the U.S. rallied from behind to stun the Red Army squad 3-2, thus advancing the United States into the gold medal game against Czechoslovakia. It was a close game for the first two periods. The Czechoslovakians held a 4-3 lead at the second intermission. But again the Americans rallied, this time exploding for six goals in the final frame to take the win 9-4 and the gold medal.

"We knew with a couple of breaks we could upset the odds." recalled goalie Jack McCartan. McCartan provided the team with those breaks, and inspired the American's to their first Olympic gold medal in hockey.

McCartan went on to a brief stint with the New York Rangers but was a minor leaguer for the most part at the pro level.
Lars-Goran Nilsson - Mika Nieminen - Ken Houston
Ted Bulley - Dusan Pasek (C) - Lars-Gunnar Pettersson
George Allen - Rolf Edberg - Frank Carson
Paul Woods (A) - Eric Belanger - Rick Chartraw

Fred Barrett (A) - Jack Brownschidle
Kari Eloranta - Gert Blome
Josef Horesovsky - Michael Thelven

Jack McCartan


Last edited by Rob Scuderi: 01-14-2012 at 02:20 PM.
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Old
01-14-2012, 04:01 PM
  #100
EagleBelfour
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bring Back Scuderi View Post
G Jack McCartan
Largest Blocker I have ever seen

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