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Last Book You Read and Rate It (Part II)

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Old
01-30-2012, 04:34 PM
  #26
bohlmeister
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Originally Posted by brtriad View Post


"Quirky" isn't the right word, but it's the first one that comes to mind.

It's the story of a medical school drop out with an interesting past. Victor's mother is a serial criminal who used to be a sex hypnotists of sort. She had a strange impact on his life and he's a sex addict. He pretends to choke in resturaunts so people can feel like a hero saving him and as a result send him birthday cards and cash. He uses this money to keep his Mom in the hospital in perpetual state as a vegetable so he feels like he has power over someone or something in his life.

The prose is clean. He spent a fair amount of time doing medical research for the book and it shows. He's spouting off medical jargon in an OCD fashion throughout the book. Quick, funny read.

6/10
hahaha.

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01-30-2012, 08:17 PM
  #27
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The Brothers Karamazov, Fyodor Dostoevsky: 10/10
Hurrah for Karamazov. Tied with Blood Meridian as my favorite book of all time.
Any suggestions for where to go next with Dostoevsky? This was my first. Waffling between The Idiot and Notes from Underground.

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01-30-2012, 08:23 PM
  #28
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Originally Posted by hototogisu View Post

The Brothers Karamazov, Fyodor Dostoevsky: 10/10
Hurrah for Karamazov. Tied with Blood Meridian as my favorite book of all time.
Any suggestions for where to go next with Dostoevsky? This was my first. Waffling between The Idiot and Notes from Underground.
I read the first 12 pages and realized I was in over my head with how small the font was and how far I had to go. One day, one day.

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01-30-2012, 08:34 PM
  #29
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Originally Posted by hototogisu View Post

The Brothers Karamazov, Fyodor Dostoevsky: 10/10
Hurrah for Karamazov. Tied with Blood Meridian as my favorite book of all time.
Any suggestions for where to go next with Dostoevsky? This was my first. Waffling between The Idiot and Notes from Underground.
The Idiot is one of my favourite novels. Crime and Punishment may be even better.

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01-30-2012, 08:36 PM
  #30
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Originally Posted by Spacegoat View Post
I read the first 12 pages and realized I was in over my head with how small the font was and how far I had to go. One day, one day.
Yeah I can see where you're coming from. I had it on my Kindle as part of the complete works of Dostoevsky, so I was never really aware of how many pages I had read or had left to go. I think it made it less daunting to start with.

Then once you get going, it actually becomes a really easy read for the most part.

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01-30-2012, 09:35 PM
  #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hototogisu View Post

The Brothers Karamazov, Fyodor Dostoevsky: 10/10
Hurrah for Karamazov. Tied with Blood Meridian as my favorite book of all time.
Any suggestions for where to go next with Dostoevsky? This was my first. Waffling between The Idiot and Notes from Underground.
Crime and Punishment. One of my favorite books.

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01-31-2012, 07:35 AM
  #32
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Walking Dead, Rise of the Governor
6/10

Ok zombie story, but felt cheated at the end. I left with the impression of reading the book and haven't learned anything on the guy. Up to the ending it's not that bad, though. pretty good sequences and you see the downfall of a simple guy in an apocalyptic world.

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01-31-2012, 08:35 AM
  #33
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Loved the Brothers K. All of you should check out "Notes From the Underground" if you haven't already.

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Old
01-31-2012, 10:27 AM
  #34
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The Unbearable Lightness of Being by Milan Kundera

9.5/10



One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
by Ken Kesey

9/10

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01-31-2012, 11:47 PM
  #35
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Half Blood Blues, by Esi Edugyan: The novel won this year’s Giller Prize (given to the author who has written the best work of Canadian fiction in the previous year), but, despite coming up with potentially a very promising plot, it failed to hold my interest. It’s principally about three black jazz musicians playing in Berlin and Paris during the Nazi Occupation. The most gifted of the three is a 20-year-old trumpet player who is arrested by the Nazis and eventually presumed dead. What little of his work that remains on record becomes the stuff of legend, while his two friends find their way back to the States and lead long lives. In their old age they return to Europe to take part in a festival honouring their comrade, only to find that there are some surprises in store, both pleasant and unpleasant. Edugyan was highly praised for her use of black dialect, which is indeed impressive, but the book consists of too many conversations that often merely constitute highly repetitive bickering that, for the most part, doesn’t go anywhere. Further, a whole series of issues are set up but never resolved and expected explanations are not always forthcoming; as a result, the final sections of the novel prove disappointing, as does one of the central characters. Though the book has some strengths, it is hard to imagine that this was the best Canadian novel of the year.

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02-03-2012, 02:27 PM
  #36
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Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson

8/10

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02-03-2012, 02:31 PM
  #37
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Banksy - Wall and Piece (This is good book cos there isn't much words just pics ). 9/10


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02-03-2012, 02:32 PM
  #38
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Second Treatise of Government by John Locke.

7/10.

Some good points about legitimacy of the government being founded by the subjects beneath it. I like his arguments for retention of property, and the natural law of rebellion. His arguments can be muddled though, and he tends to repeat himself a lot.

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02-03-2012, 04:21 PM
  #39
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Darwin's Children, by Greg Bear, 8/10. The sequel to Darwin's Radio. It's about the children who were born as a new species of human due to a retro virus hidden in our genes. Good stuff.

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02-03-2012, 04:39 PM
  #40
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American Sniper by Chris Kyle

9/10

Absolutely loved this autobiography. I'm a military history buff, so to be able to get some really good insight to the mind of one the most effective SEALs in history was very interesting. More than that though, this book actually has a lot of heart. Through Kyle's tales of understated heroism, the book has little excerpts of his wife and what her thoughts were during his entire career and often times I found myself wanting to hear more from her. It's rare to get this type of candid material from a SEAL, let alone their spouses. Just a great book overall, definitely recommend it.

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02-04-2012, 02:28 AM
  #41
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7.5/10

I'm used to reading 420 page John Sanford novels. This was 500+ and small print, very intimidating at first. But after some time I picked it up again and read it, glad I did.
Smart book, great read. Dan Brown kinda seems to be on the Masons nuts a tid bit, but it's bearable. I'd recommend it to anyone.

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02-04-2012, 08:52 PM
  #42
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On Liberty by John Stuart Mill.

9/10

Breezed through this bad boy pretty quickly, and for good reason, it is fantastic. Mill's defense for absolute freedom of speech is probably one of the best philosophical passages I have ever read, and his expert use of historical and contemporary analogies/evidence is not something you see too often from philosophers.

Fantastic read, I would recommend it to anyone who is interested in political theory.

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02-05-2012, 10:41 PM
  #43
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Crime Machine, by Giles Blunt: Coming up with a First Nations police detective in northern Ontario was a terrific idea, but in this fifth installment of Inspector Cardinal's sleuthing, the plot is the weakest in the series. The sense of atmosphere is good as usual, but the bad guy seems a real stretch and there are one or two too many twists for the mystery's own good. Better luck next time, as Blunt remains my favourite Canadian mystery writer behind Howard Engels and the Benny Cooperman series.

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02-05-2012, 10:47 PM
  #44
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The Hunger Games - 9/10
Loved it, haven't been this addicted to a book series since Eragon and HP. Onto the 2nd one now.

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02-06-2012, 02:26 AM
  #45
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I just sat down to start reading The Road by Cormac McCarthy. I gave up after 10 pages. This writing style is maddening for people who hate sentence fragments, run-on sentences and lack of punctuation. Here's an excerpt:
Quote:
He lay listening to the water drip in the woods. Bedrock, this. The cold and the silence. The ashes of the late world carried on the bleak and temporal winds to and fro in the void. Carried forth and scattered and carried forth again. Everything uncoupled from its shoring. Unsupported in the ashen air. Sustained by a breath, trembling and brief. If only my heart were alone.

He woke before dawn and watched the gray day break. Slow and half opaque. He rose while the boy slept and pulled on his shoes and wrapped in his blanket he walked out through the trees. He descended into a gryke in the stone and there he crouched coughing and he coughed for a long time. Then he just knelt in the ashes. He raised his face to the paling day. Are you there? he whispered. Will I see you at the last? Have you a neck by which to throttle you? Have you a heart? Damn you eternally have you a soul? Oh God, he whispered. Oh God.
Reading that is just maddening to me. It's also disappointing, since I was interested in reading some of Cormac McCarthy's other novels (ex. Blood Meridian, No Country for Old Men) afterward. For those who've read some of his other novels, are they like this, too? If so, I may need to pass, since this writing is much more frustrating for me than entertaining.

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02-06-2012, 06:59 AM
  #46
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Originally Posted by Osprey View Post
I just sat down to start reading The Road by Cormac McCarthy. I gave up after 10 pages. This writing style is maddening for people who hate sentence fragments, run-on sentences and lack of punctuation. Here's an excerpt:Reading that is just maddening to me. It's also disappointing, since I was interested in reading some of Cormac McCarthy's other novels (ex. Blood Meridian, No Country for Old Men) afterward. For those who've read some of his other novels, are they like this, too? If so, I may need to pass, since this writing is much more frustrating for me than entertaining.
I gave up on Blood Meridien probably a quarter of the way, through--just didn't want to read anymore of it.

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02-06-2012, 09:19 AM
  #47
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Originally Posted by Osprey View Post
I just sat down to start reading The Road by Cormac McCarthy. I gave up after 10 pages. This writing style is maddening for people who hate sentence fragments, run-on sentences and lack of punctuation. Here's an excerpt:Reading that is just maddening to me. It's also disappointing, since I was interested in reading some of Cormac McCarthy's other novels (ex. Blood Meridian, No Country for Old Men) afterward. For those who've read some of his other novels, are they like this, too? If so, I may need to pass, since this writing is much more frustrating for me than entertaining.
I've read three of them (The Road, Blood Meridian, and No Country for Old Men) and they're all pretty much like that. The style really works for me, though. The Road truly did a number on me and actually affected me on an emotional level, which is rare. I think you should stick with it but the lack of punctuation is not going to change.

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02-06-2012, 09:23 AM
  #48
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Originally Posted by Osprey View Post
I just sat down to start reading The Road by Cormac McCarthy. I gave up after 10 pages. This writing style is maddening for people who hate sentence fragments, run-on sentences and lack of punctuation. Here's an excerpt:Reading that is just maddening to me. It's also disappointing, since I was interested in reading some of Cormac McCarthy's other novels (ex. Blood Meridian, No Country for Old Men) afterward. For those who've read some of his other novels, are they like this, too? If so, I may need to pass, since this writing is much more frustrating for me than entertaining.
If you hate those things as a rule, then you're never going to get into McCarthy, because it's pretty characteristic of his style.

But I would say The Road is especially brutal, and that you might want to try one of his books with a little more variance in the narration like NCFOM or All the Pretty Horses. The Road is a book I admired rather than enjoyed, and I wouldn't recommend it as a good entry point to McCarthy's books.

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02-06-2012, 09:47 AM
  #49
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I've read three of them (The Road, Blood Meridian, and No Country for Old Men) and they're all pretty much like that. The style really works for me, though. The Road truly did a number on me and actually affected me on an emotional level, which is rare. I think you should stick with it but the lack of punctuation is not going to change.
Agreed. The Road crushed me. I thought it was amazing, but devastating.

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02-06-2012, 10:22 AM
  #50
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11/22/63: Entertaining book in the Stephen King tradition of cheesy writing mixed with some creepiness, didn't need to be 850 pages long IMO but still.

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