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hockey checking questions

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Old
08-08-2015, 02:43 AM
  #1
snowdog54
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hockey checking questions

hey.

I'm 25 and have been playing hockey for 4 years. I'm looking for advice.

I dream of playing full contact Senior-A or B hockey someday. Am I too old to learn how to play and also deal with a full-check league?

I play in a league right now that allows "incidental contact", and am joining 1 in the fall that allows open-ice hits but no board contact.

Once in a while, i also get ice by myself with a couple friends who played junior hockey & they've started teaching me the skills of checking. I'm finding it tons of fun, even though my friends like to make me fall on the ice a lot lol, but can it be learned quickly like this? or am I risking really hurting myself when i move up to rougher leagues due to lack of full-check game experience?

would appreciate advice on all of this.

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08-08-2015, 03:56 PM
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Matt Martin
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You're never too old, as long as you have the patience and willingness to pick yourself up again. As far as actually learning, anyone can get hit but it's important to learn how to take a hit properly for injury avoidance. Develop a sense of where people will be relative to where you are on the ice and learn how to absorb contact as safely as possible.

Good luck~

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08-08-2015, 11:01 PM
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snowdog54
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any other advice?

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08-09-2015, 02:01 AM
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BoonesJenner
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Do yourself a favor and learn to stick handle with your head up. You'll be a lot more effective out there.

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08-10-2015, 05:42 AM
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Steelhead16
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What position do you play? Checking as a forward or a defenseman are very different.

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08-13-2015, 04:50 AM
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raptor5191
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1. Bend your legs. And then keep your legs bent. That is a great way to absorb hits and avoid getting destroyed.

2. If you are going to get hit, do not pull off the hit. "Hit back" or lean into the hit. If you try to pull away from it or lean away you are asking to get obliterated.

3. If you are getting hit along the boards, try to get flat against them. Good chance the guy will bounce off you and will help keep your feet under you as much as possible.

4. Since you are just jumping into checking hockey, do not go LOOK for hits. Spend most of your time being ready to have guys play the body on you so they do not see you are an easy mark. As soon as guys see you are susceptible to getting bounced off the puck, everyone will do it. So, watch for it till you get the rhythm brother.

5. Speed beats contact once you understand when they are going to try to hit you. Takes a bit of experience though.

6. Remember the "one, two..take a look" rule. Never look down for more than a couple of ticks.

7. Try to get lower than the guy hitting you. The lower your center of gravity, the better off you are. If you can go shoulder to bicep or thorax instead of shoulder to shoulder you are going to be better off.

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08-14-2015, 08:45 AM
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snowdog54
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steelhead16 View Post
What position do you play? Checking as a forward or a defenseman are very different.
i'm a forward. right wing.

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08-14-2015, 08:47 AM
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snowdog54
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Quote:
Originally Posted by raptor5191 View Post
1.

If you try to pull away from it or lean away you are asking to get obliterated.
this has happened to me before.

Quote:
Originally Posted by raptor5191 View Post
1.

7. Try to get lower than the guy hitting you. The lower your center of gravity, the better off you are. If you can go shoulder to bicep or thorax instead of shoulder to shoulder you are going to be better off.
what's the thorax?

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08-14-2015, 10:42 AM
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Fixed to Ruin
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I wouldn't play with checking as an adult.

I wouldn't want to lose a few paycheques because I got a concussion, separated shoulder or worse because I played in a league with body contact.

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08-14-2015, 01:57 PM
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snowdog54
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fixed to Ruin View Post
I wouldn't play with checking as an adult.

I wouldn't want to lose a few paycheques because I got a concussion, separated shoulder or worse because I played in a league with body contact.
I don't have to worry about that stuff. I don't have a "normal" job. I inherited an apartment building.

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08-14-2015, 03:20 PM
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Kane88
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snowdog54 View Post
I don't have to worry about that stuff. I don't have a "normal" job. I inherited an apartment building.
Being a winger watch out for the D pinching on the breakout and don't really look for hits at first once you take a few you'll learn to give them. The first year may be pretty hard for you but you'll get the hang of it.

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08-14-2015, 03:58 PM
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Tacks92
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kane88 View Post
Being a winger watch out for the D pinching on the breakout and don't really look for hits at first once you take a few you'll learn to give them. The first year may be pretty hard for you but you'll get the hang of it.
Yep, especially if you have your back to the D when receiving the pass. Very easy to turn around and get destroyed. The trick is to be aware of what's happening around you, so that when you do turnaround, you'll have an idea of where that d man is and be able to make a better decision.

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Old
08-17-2015, 06:02 PM
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Steelhead16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snowdog54 View Post
i'm a forward. right wing.
Playing wing you really need to concentrate on using contact to create turnovers in your offensive zone. Forget about trying open ice hits in the neutral zone and certainly don't take yourself out of position to make a hit in the defensive zone. Raptor gave you a few good techniques so I won't repeat those.
Hitting in the offensive zone is a read and react skill. In today's game you can't hit anyone much if any after they have gotten rid of the puck so you need to read where the puck is going to go and be on your way there so you show up as the puck arrives and you can knock the opposing player off the puck as he receives the puck and before he can unload it. Make sure you stop skating and coast into the hit to avoid a charging penalty. It will also help with being able to center your balance and get in a good hitting position. Also commit to the hit. Don't go in trying to poke around with your stick and then try and make a check. Go in, hit and tie the guy up if he doesn't unload the puck. Then try and knock it loose for a teammate to get. Even if you don't turn the puck over the first time, a couple good hits on the same guy and he may just unload it later so he doesn't get hit again.
Use checking as a tool and not just an ego stroke for yourself. Throwing big hits takes time and experience. People will remember a big whiff more than they remember a big hit so pick your spots and just make solid hits along the boards for a purpose until you figure out what you're doing.

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Old
08-18-2015, 02:59 AM
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Pacifist Goon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fixed to Ruin View Post
I wouldn't play with checking as an adult.

I wouldn't want to lose a few paycheques because I got a concussion, separated shoulder or worse because I played in a league with body contact.
Hey that can easily happen anyway, non-contact or otherwise, accidental or otherwise. If you have to look out for it, at least you're on heightened alert if you know it's coming at some stage. Maybe more likely to get injured when you let your guard down or aren't expecting it because it's 'non-contact'.

I'm 41 and would way prefer to be playing some form of contact.

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Old
08-27-2015, 04:29 AM
  #15
raptor5191
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snowdog54 View Post
what's the thorax?
Abdomen

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Old
08-27-2015, 07:14 AM
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Learn to be strong on your skates. Practice yogo-style balancing off the ice to develop fine muscle coordination and strength. When you can crank out 10 deep one-legged squats, you'll be hard to knock off your skates.

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Old
08-27-2015, 08:54 AM
  #17
sanityplease
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Don't do it.

Bouncing around with your buddies is one thing, but taking a suicide pass in your skates while crossing the blue line in a competitive game will get you destroyed.

You can't protect yourself from a blindside, board, or an elbow to the head. There are too many heroes (who don't have a clue how to be responsible/safe) out there looking to line someone up & crush them. It's only a matter of time until you get K.O'd, or concussed, or broken facial bones, or neck damage, or worse.

Sorry to be blunt. Playing full checking as an amateur adult player is looking for a serious injury.

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