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No grip on one skate, sharpening or me?

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Old
01-15-2017, 12:03 AM
  #1
Zennon
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No grip on one skate, sharpening or me?

I just bought a new pair of skate and have them sharpened. Problem is my left skate doesn't grip to the ice. I had them both resharpened at the same store and still have the same problem.

So what could be the problem here? The sharpening? The skate / blade? myself (not putting enough weight on that foot? or something else?) I am an ok skater, not newbie, nor very good.

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01-15-2017, 04:50 AM
  #2
Goonzilla
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zennon View Post
I just bought a new pair of skate and have them sharpened. Problem is my left skate doesn't grip to the ice. I had them both resharpened at the same store and still have the same problem.

So what could be the problem here? The sharpening? The skate / blade? myself (not putting enough weight on that foot? or something else?) I am an ok skater, not newbie, nor very good.
You never know; it could be a skate problem; maybe a blade got dulled or damaged if you don't use skateguards, but if you're a novice skater, my money is on you being the problem, or rather your skating.

Invariably, inexperienced skaters are stronger on one side or skate than the other, particularly noticeable through things like crossovers and tight turns. You've got to really put some effort into skating on and working on both sides, in particular getting or really accentuating your knee bend and rotating your upper body or shoulders towards where you want to go.

I see some guys looking very proficient skating anti-clockwise around the circle, but when they change direction, they are very stiff, upright and awkward looking; they're struggling to translate that technique or mirror their stance onto their weak side.

It's hard to comment on how to fix it without seeing you skate and identifying exactly what you mean by 'not gripping' the ice. Are you on the flat of the blade so that the skate is sliding?

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01-15-2017, 06:27 AM
  #3
puckpilot
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Unless your LHS are a bunch of complete and utter incompetents, there's something strange happening on your side of things.

In regards to sharpening, a couple of things you can try. First just do a visual inspection of the blades. See if the edges look flattened in some way. Take a look at the skate that's biting into the ice and compare it to the one that isn't. Are there any visible differences?

Next look at how the holders are mounted to the skates. Compare both skates. See if there are any differences between the two skates. One of your holders could be mounted incorrectly.

Next, hold one of your skates upside down so the blade is pointing up in the air. Now place your thumb nail against one of edges at about a 45 degree angle. Put a little bit of pressure against the blade and drag it down the edge. Does the edge bite into your nail? If it does, there's most likely a decent enough edge on the blade.

This is an imprecise test, but if your nail slides smoothly down the edge, it's an indication there could be something wrong with the sharpening. Do this and see if there's a difference between the edges of one skate vs the other. If the both feel the same, then there's a good chance the skates are good, and it's something on your side of things that's wonky.

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01-15-2017, 11:06 AM
  #4
AIREAYE
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Quote:
Originally Posted by puckpilot View Post
Unless your LHS are a bunch of complete and utter incompetents, there's something strange happening on your side of things.

In regards to sharpening, a couple of things you can try. First just do a visual inspection of the blades. See if the edges look flattened in some way. Take a look at the skate that's biting into the ice and compare it to the one that isn't. Are there any visible differences?

Next look at how the holders are mounted to the skates. Compare both skates. See if there are any differences between the two skates. One of your holders could be mounted incorrectly.

Next, hold one of your skates upside down so the blade is pointing up in the air. Now place your thumb nail against one of edges at about a 45 degree angle. Put a little bit of pressure against the blade and drag it down the edge. Does the edge bite into your nail? If it does, there's most likely a decent enough edge on the blade.

This is an imprecise test, but if your nail slides smoothly down the edge, it's an indication there could be something wrong with the sharpening. Do this and see if there's a difference between the edges of one skate vs the other. If the both feel the same, then there's a good chance the skates are good, and it's something on your side of things that's wonky.
To add to these good ideas, I'll just say that the nail test is a poor way of telling because even on dulled/nicked edges, your nails are always softer than steel. Only way that test really works if the steel was never sharpened in the first place!

From my sharpening experience, best way to tell general edge existence is to drag your fingers, palms down and the segments between the palm and fingertips, perpindicular to the edges along various spots.

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01-15-2017, 12:44 PM
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Zennon
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Thanks guy... physically both skates and blades looks similar.

What i meant is straight line simple push with left skate and it won't bite into the ice, it will slip. Slow turn, it will not glide but kinda slow down, i can hear like breaking noise.

Being a novice and my left foot not my strong foot i have some doubt about my "technique", so i'll focus on that one and see. Maybe i need a hollower sharpening? I'll try a different shop if it doesn't change.

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01-15-2017, 03:04 PM
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Auston Marlander
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AIREAYE View Post
To add to these good ideas, I'll just say that the nail test is a poor way of telling because even on dulled/nicked edges, your nails are always softer than steel. Only way that test really works if the steel was never sharpened in the first place!

From my sharpening experience, best way to tell general edge existence is to drag your fingers, palms down and the segments between the palm and fingertips, perpindicular to the edges along various spots.
Kind of. If you know what you are looking for there is a noticeable difference between a sharp and dull skate with the fingernail test. For someone doing it for the first time it would all look the same.

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01-15-2017, 04:47 PM
  #7
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Originally Posted by Zennon View Post
Thanks guy... physically both skates and blades looks similar.

What i meant is straight line simple push with left skate and it won't bite into the ice, it will slip. Slow turn, it will not glide but kinda slow down, i can hear like breaking noise.

Being a novice and my left foot not my strong foot i have some doubt about my "technique", so i'll focus on that one and see. Maybe i need a hollower sharpening? I'll try a different shop if it doesn't change.
Yeah, straight line, the angle of your blade on your left skate is flat to the ice like 'll', hence your edge gets no bite into to ice and you just slide. You need it on some angle to get that edge biting and gripping, more like your blade looking like '//'. You need to flex your foot or ankle a little to find the inside edge. It might be as easy as bending your knees and getting your feet just a little further apart; the angle of your blade will adjust automatically with your foot out a little wider; providing your skates fit and are laced properly.

I'd suggest standing stationary at the boards and just pushing your feet about practising changing your edges about between cutting or gripping (leaning on your edges) and decreasing the angle until you go from your edge biting to sliding or shaving the ice. It's really the whole knack of skating, understanding and being able to control and use your edges.

It's not that easy to articulate by comment, but you'll find something on YouTube easily that will show you better.

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01-15-2017, 05:36 PM
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Zennon
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Originally Posted by Goonzilla View Post
Yeah, straight line, the angle of your blade on your left skate is flat to the ice like 'll', hence your edge gets no bite into to ice and you just slide. You need it on some angle to get that edge biting and gripping, more like your blade looking like '//'. You need to flex your foot or ankle a little to find the inside edge. It might be as easy as bending your knees and getting your feet just a little further apart; the angle of your blade will adjust automatically with your foot out a little wider; providing your skates fit and are laced properly.

I'd suggest standing stationary at the boards and just pushing your feet about practising changing your edges about between cutting or gripping (leaning on your edges) and decreasing the angle until you go from your edge biting to sliding or shaving the ice. It's really the whole knack of skating, understanding and being able to control and use your edges.

It's not that easy to articulate by comment, but you'll find something on YouTube easily that will show you better.
I just came back from a skate and i focused on the left foot and i believe there is something wrong with the sharpening. Even if i stay still and make a /\ with my knee, my left foot is still shaving the ice, not the right one. I tried different angle and it's still not biting. Same with a right turn, it's shaving ice instead of gliding.

I will go to a different store to redo the sharpening and hopefully that will solve the problem.

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01-15-2017, 06:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zennon View Post
I just came back from a skate and i focused on the left foot and i believe there is something wrong with the sharpening. Even if i stay still and make a /\ with my knee, my left foot is still shaving the ice, not the right one. I tried different angle and it's still not biting. Same with a right turn, it's shaving ice instead of gliding.

I will go to a different store to redo the sharpening and hopefully that will solve the problem.
Invert the skate and place a quarter horizontally on the blade, balanced on the two edges.

It should lie perpendicular to the blade. If it isn't the hollow will be off and one edge will not dig in properly.


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01-15-2017, 07:22 PM
  #10
AIREAYE
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Originally Posted by Auston Marlander View Post
Kind of. If you know what you are looking for there is a noticeable difference between a sharp and dull skate with the fingernail test. For someone doing it for the first time it would all look the same.
Yes fair enough on that point. I just prefer not to do it when I am checking. I would also discourage those who do not know what to look for to NOT rely on that method.

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01-15-2017, 08:21 PM
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An easy check if all things (holders) are equal would be to swap blades, I was able to find an uneven blade this way.

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01-22-2017, 08:48 AM
  #12
Mr Jiggyfly
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zennon View Post
I just bought a new pair of skate and have them sharpened. Problem is my left skate doesn't grip to the ice. I had them both resharpened at the same store and still have the same problem.

So what could be the problem here? The sharpening? The skate / blade? myself (not putting enough weight on that foot? or something else?) I am an ok skater, not newbie, nor very good.
Did you tell the guy sharpening your skates that they were new?

It's usually common practice to crossgrind new skates and it has always made a big difference for me. Played for 25 years, so I have broken in more than my fair share of new skates.

Go back to the shop and have them crossgrind your skates and you will see a big difference in the grip.

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Old
01-23-2017, 12:14 PM
  #13
RibFrabcus
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My right skate sometimes slips during crossovers to the right. It's because I don't fully commit to my outside edge. Something I'm getting better at but still revert back sometimes.

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