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ATD 2012 - Draft Thread VI

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Old
02-23-2012, 09:21 PM
  #101
EagleBelfour
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With our 14th selection, the 435th overall in this year All-Time Draft, l'équipe nationale de France st fier de sélectionner, from LaSalle, Quebec, l'entraîneur en chef Jacques Lemaire


Lemaire's best imitation of a bear

Stanley Cup Champion (1995)
Jack Adams Trophy (1994, 2003)

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02-23-2012, 09:27 PM
  #102
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So Lemaire is a good chef?

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02-23-2012, 09:28 PM
  #103
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Originally Posted by EagleBelfour View Post
With our 14th selection, the 435th overall in this year All-Time Draft, l'équipe nationale de France st fier de sélectionner, from LaSalle, Quebec, l'entraîneur en chef Jacques Lemaire


Lemaire's best imitation of a bear

Stanley Cup Champion (1995)
Jack Adams Trophy (1994, 2003)
Poor Frank Mahovlich. All he ever wanted to do was play offense!

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02-23-2012, 09:28 PM
  #104
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I don't think my team fit the description of a team who could perform well under Lemaire, a coach I looked at and later checked off, but he's a good pick.

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02-23-2012, 09:29 PM
  #105
EagleBelfour
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Originally Posted by TheDevilMadeMe View Post
Poor Frank Mahovlich. All he ever wanted to do was play offense!
So he'll castrate him just like he did with Marian Gaborik?

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02-23-2012, 09:33 PM
  #106
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I'm really happy I took Irvin when I did because one of my two picks here would have been Lemaire otherwise (I assumed you got the reference I made to you TDMM whenever I said that my initial idea was a guy you are pretty familiar with), and I wouldn't have moved up to get him.

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02-23-2012, 09:36 PM
  #107
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One cool thing about Pat Burns in an ATD setting which is one year is that he always managed to produce results right away with all of his clubs exceptionnally well, so he's one of the best at making an immediate impact with a new group of player under him , his personality also brings a lot of leadership by his force of character and the respect he inspire.

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02-23-2012, 09:37 PM
  #108
TheDevilMadeMe
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Originally Posted by EagleBelfour View Post
So he'll castrate him just like he did with Marian Gaborik?
Lemaire won't castrate Frank; he'll just make him miserable

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02-23-2012, 09:38 PM
  #109
EagleBelfour
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Lemaire won't castrate Frank; he'll just make him miserable
Please enlighten me.

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02-23-2012, 09:49 PM
  #110
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Originally Posted by EagleBelfour View Post
Please enlighten me.
The list of goal scoring wingers Lemaire made miserable by requiring that they play system hockey is quite long and full of undrafteds. Gaborik (should we really be mentioning his name?) was one of them.

Misery isn't necessary bad, as long as they still play well

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02-23-2012, 10:02 PM
  #111
EagleBelfour
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Originally Posted by TheDevilMadeMe View Post
Te list of goal scoring wingers Lemaire made miserable by requiring that they play system hockey is quite long and full of undrafteds. Gaborik (should we really be mentioning his name?) was one of them.

Misery isn't necessary bad, as long as they still play well
Oh, now I understand. I'm not even disagreeing.

Even comparing to the ATD level, Lemaire never had that kind of creativity offensively with Frank Mahovlich and Sidney Crosby. His best two offensive weapon when he won both of his Jack Adams were probably Stephane Richer and Marian Gaborik (too late at this point, probably not gonna get picked for a couple of hundred picks though). The point is, I do not see Lemaire working with Mahovlich in any way a problem. Frank issues with coaching in Toronto was the climate of oppression he had to live with for all those seasons. Jacques Lemaire is definitely a demanding coach (but which great coach isnt?), but although demanding in the specific style of play he wants to see on the ice, he is I believe a good communicator, and that alone is enough to make Mahovlich comfortable. I don't know if Mahovlich reputation around here is that he was a floater and a 'crybaby' who always wanted to play his all-offense style of hockey, but that's not the case, and he can adapt to different brand of hockey, which he did in the NHL (perhaps WHA, but I have no clue and those teams were playing). Jacques Lemaire is also arguably one of the 10 best coach of All-Time, and I believe he can adapt depending on the players he's got on his team, although he will always remain a defensive oriented coach with specifics ideas on how to play the game.

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02-23-2012, 10:47 PM
  #112
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I'm not going to pretend to have watched as much miserable, horrible, boring, soul sucking hockey as TDMM was subjected to by being a Devils fan during the Lemaire era... but I do have Lemaire right up there among the best hockey minds ever.

His most recent example - the turn around the Devils made after he took over from MacLean - was amazing.

Obviously his preference is to be strong defensively at all times, but I think we have to keep in mind what he had to work with offensively much of his coaching career. I think he would let up a bit when he had the roster to be successful doing so. When your best players are Stevens and Brodeur.. well.. play the hand you're dealt.

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02-23-2012, 10:49 PM
  #113
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Originally Posted by BraveCanadian View Post
I'm not going to pretend to have watched as much miserable, horrible, boring, soul sucking hockey as TDMM was subjected to by being a Devils fan during the Lemaire era... but I do have Lemaire right up there among the best hockey minds ever.

His most recent example - the turn around the Devils made after he took over from MacLean - was amazing.

Obviously his preference is to be strong defensively at all times, but I think we have to keep in mind what he had to work with offensively much of his coaching career. I think he would let up a bit when he had the roster to be successful doing so. When your best players are Stevens and Brodeur.. well.. play the hand you're dealt.
Well said. That's what I believe also.

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02-23-2012, 10:57 PM
  #114
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Originally Posted by BraveCanadian View Post
I'm not going to pretend to have watched as much miserable, horrible, boring, soul sucking hockey as TDMM was subjected to by being a Devils fan during the Lemaire era... but I do have Lemaire right up there among the best hockey minds ever.

His most recent example - the turn around the Devils made after he took over from MacLean - was amazing.

Obviously his preference is to be strong defensively at all times, but I think we have to keep in mind what he had to work with offensively much of his coaching career. I think he would let up a bit when he had the roster to be successful doing so. When your best players are Stevens and Brodeur.. well.. play the hand you're dealt.
Deboer is doing pretty well for himself too. Lemaire is definitely a solid ATD coach, but I think a blind chimp would be a better NHL coach than John MacLean. It also didn't help that MacLean had to deal with a cancer in the lockerroom who was an ex-teammate not that much younger so he didn't feel comfortable doing anything about it

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02-23-2012, 11:09 PM
  #115
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Modo View Post
With his pick, he selects Lloyd Cook, D.
Nice, thanks for making my pick.


Lloyd Cook



I really like what Cook brings as a bottom-pairing guy. I wanted a defender with some offensive kick without having to play sheltered minutes, and I think I've achieved that here. Cook is big, tough, solid defensively, and has a proven ability to join the rush when appropriate; something I'm looking for on each of my defense pairings. He has great posture too.

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02-23-2012, 11:38 PM
  #116
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After some rethinking my Plager - Gardiner selection and realizing Herb works best with a more offensive minded partner, the Fireworks are very please to select:


D Carol Vadnais






Vadnais, sometimes gets a bad rap as a offense only guy. However he was never a liability defensively, played very high minute totals for very good Boston and New York Ranger teams and was actually used a lot to kill penalties. Check out some great work by Overpass:

http://hfboards.hockeysfuture.com/sh...=carol+vadnais


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02-23-2012, 11:50 PM
  #117
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The Philadelphia Flyers select a guy that is all heart and soul, a great leader, a very good two-way player, and a penalty killer, Trevor Linden



2x NHL All Star Game Participant
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After all these years, Cliff Ronning lets us in on a secret that speaks glowingly of Trevor Linden's competitiveness and tenacity.

"You don't know this, but Trevor Linden had cracked ribs and torn rib cartilage for the last four games of the 1994 Stanley Cup Final," Cliff Ronning said. "You can't imagine what it's like to hear your captain, in a room down the hall, screaming at the top of his lungs as they injected the needle into his rib cage. Knowing him, he probably thought we couldn't hear. He would then walk into our dressing room like nothing had happened. That was inspirational."

"Pat Quinn was inspirational to the younger players and put us in situations that we'd be accountable to each other. That's where Trevor fit in. He showed us that his accountability as a player was to the team, not to Trevor. By playing on the defensive side of the puck and taking hits to make plays, to staying in the night before a big game, Trevor set the disciplinary tone by himself. That's why we saw him as a great leader.

"Quinn slowly groomed our team as he went along and he needed a captain who shared his philosophy of hard work," Ronning said. "Trevor never took a shift off. He sacrificed his body to block shots and did a lot of little things that some scorers won't do. That's what made him an excellent captain."

"Certain people have leadership skills in their makeup and it was abundantly evident in Trevor Linden," said Quinn, who named Linden team captain at age 21. "He had shown it as a young player and we were a team changing our ethic. We hadn't been a winning organization. He seemed the right guy to put in there to be our leader and captain.

"He was a high-level performer who brought his level up in the big games. He didn't make mistakes and he scored important goals. Even if he wasn't a prolific scorer, he was that good, solid, two-way player that coaches love to have in the lineup.
http://canucks.nhl.com/club/news.htm?id=453227

Quote:
In comparison to Gretzky and the Soviets, Linden may seem an odd choice. Linden was not flashy or high skilled, not a great scorer or a flawless skater. He was essentially a hard worker, the personification of selflessness, an unquantifiable hockeyist who excelled in intangibles, effort and class.

He was also a great person - the kind of person we all want to be. Perhaps that drew me to him as much as his hockey. His charity efforts, his tireless effort on the ice, and his genuine likability off of it.

Before the beginning of the 1991-92 season, Linden was named as the new team captain, making him the youngest captain in the National Hockey League. The 21 year old Linden would go on to lead the team in scoring for the 2nd straight year. It also was the first season of Canuck dominance. Captain Canuck guided the team to a 42-26-12 record. The 96 points gave the Canucks their first Smythe Division title since 1975. The following season Linden would lead the team to another 1st place finish based on a 46-29-9 record for the team's first 100+ point season.

Linden led the Canucks to the team's greatest moment in 1994 - game 7 of the Stanley Cup playoffs. After a relatively disappointing 85 point, 2nd place finish, the Canucks caught fire in the playoffs. After falling behind 3-1 in the opening round against Calgary, the Canucks stormed back to win 4 games to 3 and then would blow by Dallas and Toronto to face Mark Messier, Mike Keenan and the New York Rangers. Lead by Linden's leadership and physical play, Pavel Bure's goal scoring and Kirk McLean's incredible goaltending, the Canucks took the Rangers to 7 games. The final game was as close as could possibly be. Had Nathan Lafeyette's shot hit the inside of the goalpost instead of the outside, perhaps the Canucks could have forced overtime. Unfortunately, the Canucks would lose game 7 by a score of 3 goals to 2, both scored by Trevor Linden.

1995-96 would prove to be Trevor's best season statistically as he would set career highs in goals (33) assists (47) and points (80). But as anyone who knows Trevor, his value is not determined by statistical output, but rather by intangibles.

At the conclusion of the season, Linden was named the winner of the King Clancy Memorial Trophy as "the player who best exemplifies leadership qualities on and off the ice and has made noteworthy humanitarian contributions to his community." Linden started "Captain's Crew," which gave children who would not otherwise have the chance the opportunity to attend Canuck games. He also is a big supporter of Canuck Place hospice, the Ronald McDonald House, Youth Against Violence and Children's Hospital. Linden would also win the Gillette World Champion Award, given to the Canadian athlete demonstrating athletic excellence, sportsmanship and humanitarian contributions.

1997-98 saw the arrival of Mark Messier, considered by many to be the greatest captain in North American sports. As a sign of true leadership, Trevor handed the team captaincy over to Mark Messier prior to start of season. To hand over something so important and so honored as the captaincy of a NHL team shows that Linden was more concerned with the good of the team than his own ego.

One day after being traded, Linden headed to Nagano as a member of the first ever Olympic Team Canada that included the top 25 Canadian born NHL players. Linden would score the only goal in Canada's disappointing loss to Dominik Hasek and the Czech Republic.

Linden, a natural right winger, was shifted to center ice later in his career in Vancouver and has played there ever since. He excelled on face-offs and is usually in sound defensive position, but the move changed his game immensely. He was much more physical on right wing. Moving up and down the wall, Linden excelled by hitting and banging. He was always at his best when he is playing physically. However at center ice, Linden did not get the chance to play the same physical game, as he remained disciplined and rarely strays from the middle of the ice, so that he was not caught out of position should the other team get the puck. This defensive discipline also hurts Trevor's offensive output. He no longer drove to the net as hard as he would if he were on the wing, again sacrificing his offensive output so that someone remains high to help out the defensemen.

Mike Brophy wrote in The Hockey News a spectacularly wonderful article on Trevor. I'd like to share a small portion of it here:

Linden believes it is attention to detail that has helped him excel.

"People always tell me I'm a great playoff performer," Linden says, "and the only reason I can think that is, is because in the playoffs doing the little things right counts the most."

Watch Linden closely and you won't be blown away by any particular skill; his conviction and determination are his strengths. He doesn't have the hardest shot in the league, yet the puck doesn't flutter when he snaps it towards the gal. He is a deceptively fast skater. In a race for the puck, an opponent might look like he's skating quicker, but Linden often gets there first using a long, fluent stride."

Trevor Linden is a leader. Trevor Linden is a winner. You have to watch his game closely to truly appreciate his excellence.
http://canuckslegends.blogspot.com/2...or-linden.html

Quote:
Against most peoples better judgment, Linden made the team that first year when many believed he could have used some more seasoning in the minors. But like a trooper he took the bull by the horns and would instantly provide leadership to the organization. Something he was known to do throughout his entire 19 year career.

He finished second in Calder voting that year, losing out to an amazing defenseman by the name of Brian Leetch.
Linden was the new savior, the one who would change the face of the franchise. The team had retooled their front office and brought in Pat Quinn in a controversial move from Los Angeles. He would, for many years, be the father figure for young players learning the ropes of the pro game.

For the next ten seasons, Trevor Linden would be the face of the franchise and even through a nasty contract dispute in 1993, he came out of the other side loved; an accomplishment not many players can earn.

Number sixteen, of course, saved his best for the 1994 Stanley Cup Playoffs. Linden played like a man possessed.


Constantly injured and often fatigued beyond belief, he was able to still lead this team to a place they never thought imaginable.

Playing the final series against the New York Rangers, Captain Canuck had a broken nose, a slightly separated shoulder and cracked ribs. Injuries which he never made mention of until after the playoffs were completed.

The site of him sobbing in the corner after the final whistle blew to end the game and with Mark Messier, not Linden himself skating around with the Cup told you all you needed to know about Trevor Linden; especially on that night. Devastation spilled across his face. Not just for personal reasons, but for the team and the city of Vancouver who so desperately needed something to believe in.

However, price was not of concern because Trevor Linden was home as Captain Canuck.

Though his skills had declined, his heart grew in the time he was away. He was very appreciative of all he had in Vancouver, possibly even more from his original days as a Canuck. He played whatever role they threw at him, no longer worrying about having to put the team on his shoulders. They had Naslund and Bertuzzi to take care of those situations.

Trevor Linden may not have been a superstar and will never make the Hall Of Fame but, his number 16 jersey hangs prominently in the rafters for good reason.

The man accomplished his tasks. He saved a franchise through hard work, dedication and a heart of gold. He saved the game we loved by putting it back on the ice. He competed for his country in the Olympics and he left the game on his terms, never regretting the fact he had never won a Cup or any major award. Linden was gratified simply by being a part of the Vancouver Canucks organization.

I personally can not think of a player more deserving of the honor of having his number hang for eternity.

Not a superstar nor flashy; simply put, he was Trevor Linden.
http://thehockeyguys.net/stuff-of-le...trevor-linden/

Quote:
Mere statistics, however, are a feeble yardstick of Linden's abilities. He can play every position but goaltender. At 6'4", 200 pounds, he is as comfortable mucking in corners—the NHL's trenches—as he is tinkering under the hood of his vintage Mustang. He dumps the puck in deep and goes in and digs it out. "We knew he was a good cornerman and a good defensive player," says Vancouver coach Bob McCammon. "But we didn't know he'd give us so much offensively." And will be able to for so long—just think, in a couple of years Linden will be legal to go out with his teammates for a postgame beer anywhere the NHL plays. He's the youngest player in the league and won't turn 19 until April 11.

"I don't see how he can miss," says Farwell, now general manager of the WHL Seattle Thunderbirds. "He's got the work ethic of a Bobby Clarke, but I think he may be more talented than Bobby was."

"Usually with a rookie, you're waiting for some sign of maturity," says Snepsts. "With Trev, you wait and wait for him to show some sign that he's still only a kid."
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/vau...22/2/index.htm

Quote:
I know for a fact that Trevor goes all out every time he laces on the skates. In the eight years I've been here, there's no player I respect more than Trevor Linden.

Linden was a prototype power forward with a 6'4", 220 pound frame. He was the building block player that Canucks general manager Pat Quinn dreamed about selecting with the 2nd overall pick at the 1988 NHL Entry Draft...According to Brian Burke, "With Pat being in charge, we probably would have taken Trevor anyway. We all respected Mike Modano as a player and saw the offensive gifts that Trevor didn't have. We knew Trevor would be a solid two-way player.

"He's had that leadership quality his whole life. He's a character kid. I think you'll see Vancouver got the best player in the draft."

And like Bobby Clarke, the former gap toothed Flyers captain with whom he was compared, Linden played hard when it mattered the most-the Stanley Cup playoffs.
http://books.google.com/books?id=U4Z...linden&f=false

Quote:
VANCOUVER - Regarded by many in Vancouver as the most clutch hockey player in Canucks history, Trevor Linden bolstered that reputation on Sunday.
http://www.nhl.com/ice/news.htm?id=377437

Quote:
And what else would you expect? Since he arrived in Vancouver from Medicine Hat all those years ago with the heart of a lion and the physique of a one-iron, Linden's message hasn't changed.

It's always been about the win. It's always been about the team.
Sure, it's nice to contribute, but there are far more important issues -- and he said that when he was scoring 35 goals a year, and he says it now when he's scoring 12.

"I don't have anything concrete," he said. "We're all no-nonsense players and those guys are big guys. When we forecheck together, we seem to have some success."
http://www.canada.com/theprovince/ne...f528b5&k=78445

Quote:
Trevor Linden, a board-rattling wing from Medicine Hat
https://www.google.com/search?hl=en&...w=1366&bih=638


Last edited by BillyShoe1721: 02-29-2012 at 12:08 PM.
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02-24-2012, 12:00 AM
  #118
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Dawson City is pleased to welcome Victor Kuzkin, D.

He will be reunited alongside defensive partner and fellow countryman Vitaly Davydov.

http://www.chidlovski.com/personal/1...oster/ru04.htm

Quote:
The Soviet defense pairing of Kuzkin-Davydov was arguably one of the greatest in Soviet hockey history.
Sound positional hockey and defensive awareness. Mix in a bit of playmaking and a ton of chemistry, and you've got a pretty solid defensive tandem there.

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02-24-2012, 12:26 AM
  #119
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Originally Posted by EagleBelfour View Post
With our 14th selection, the 435th overall in this year All-Time Draft, l'équipe nationale de France st fier de sélectionner, from LaSalle, Quebec, l'entraîneur en chef Jacques Lemaire


Lemaire's best imitation of a bear

Stanley Cup Champion (1995)
Jack Adams Trophy (1994, 2003)
I don't particularly like you.

Quote:
Originally Posted by markrander87 View Post
After some rethinking my Plager - Gardiner selection and realizing Herb works best with a more offensive minded partner, the Fireworks are very please to select:


D Carol Vadnais






Vadnais, sometimes gets a bad rap as a offense only guy. However he was never a liability defensively, played very high minute totals for very good Boston and New York Ranger teams and was actually used a lot to kill penalties. Check out some great work by Overpass:

http://hfboards.hockeysfuture.com/sh...=carol+vadnais
I've been trying to get him for like 5 drafts in a row now but he always goes before I can.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BillyShoe1721 View Post
The Philadelphia Flyers select a guy that is all heart and soul, a great leader, a very good two-way player, a penalty killer, and our 3rd line center, Trevor Linden



Of the now 7 former captains on our team, Trevor will likely carry the C for the Flyers. We think a line of Stanfield-Linden-Hyland brings a very good combination of size(6'4", 6' and 5'6"), physicality, two-way play, and scoring.



http://canucks.nhl.com/club/news.htm?id=453227



http://canuckslegends.blogspot.com/2...or-linden.html
I think I've been trying to get him for like 9 now. Captain though, eh? Interesting.

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02-24-2012, 12:27 AM
  #120
TheDevilMadeMe
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I'm at the 1 year anniversary of the Doctor Who themed bar in Brooklyn surrounded by hot nerdy girls and there was just a burlesque show - one of the acts was an Amy lookalike with a Doctor Who ragdoll.

And Raptor thinks I was a good one to send his list to. He picks defensive defenseman

Ken Morrow, D

Someone else figure out how to contact LL please

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02-24-2012, 12:31 AM
  #121
EagleBelfour
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Ken Morrow, D
He was second to my list. It's a very worthy fall from the 270-to-330 he usually goes, but at this point he's a very nice selection, and a great, great 5th stay-at-home defenceman. Very similar to Bill Hajt I would say.

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02-24-2012, 12:49 AM
  #122
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It's forgotten how good Linden was in his youth I think. 70-80 points, leadership, defence...grit. Team Canada recognized it twice having him on their best-on-best roster.

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02-24-2012, 12:53 AM
  #123
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Originally Posted by vancityluongo View Post
I've been trying to get him for like 5 drafts in a row now but he always goes before I can..
It's true, we even tossed his name around in ATD11.

He's even better than you and I thought back then - a lot better, actually.

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02-24-2012, 12:53 AM
  #124
Nalyd Psycho
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Linden is one of those guys who gets short-changed in a system like this. At the ATD level, he has no skill that stands out. He wasn't great offensively or defensively, and he wasn't an intimidating force. But what he was was amazingly complete. Two-position player, great on faceoffs, heart and soul kinda guy.

Big fan of Vadnais, had him a couple times. Whenever I needed some offensive punch in the second half of my team, first guy I'd go to.

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02-24-2012, 12:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nalyd Psycho View Post
Linden is one of those guys who gets short-changed in a system like this. At the ATD level, he has no skill that stands out. He wasn't great offensively or defensively, and he wasn't an intimidating force. But what he was was amazingly complete. Two-position player, great on faceoffs, heart and soul kinda guy.
Yep, not a stand-out at anything, simply ''pretty good'' at everything in his prime. He doesn't have much longevity as an impact player either - which hurts. Second half of his career he was a shell of his former self.

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