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Molodezhnaya Hokkeinaya Liga (MHL) - Part II

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05-26-2014, 08:49 AM
  #926
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It seems to be a very bad decision by MHL to play in Crimea.

pretty happy for Eisbaren and HC Jackals as they are close geographically to Energie KV.
Information about accepting Crimean club to the league has been removed.

Seems like they discussed it but league said no.

Therefore, 9 new teams.

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05-26-2014, 08:55 AM
  #927
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HC Jackals are from Slovakia?? MHL site wrote it as Slovenia

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05-26-2014, 09:02 AM
  #928
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Information about accepting Crimean club to the league has been removed.

Seems like they discussed it but league said no.
Not removed, but replaced with Murmansk. Interesting though...
Hockey to corrupt a bandy town
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HC Jackals are from Slovakia?? MHL site wrote it as Slovenia
I think it's a mistake, the roster should be mostly Polish anyways.

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05-26-2014, 09:18 AM
  #929
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HC Jackals are from Slovakia?? MHL site wrote it as Slovenia
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I think it's a mistake, the roster should be mostly Polish anyways.
HC Jackals was founded by former Slovak G Miroslav Michalek and Slovak player Lubos Bartečko in cooperation with Polish hockey association. They will play in Poprad, so they are mostly Slovak.


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05-26-2014, 12:59 PM
  #930
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HC Jackals was founded by former Slovak G Miroslav Michalek and Slovak player Lubos Bartečko in cooperation with Polish hockey association. They will play in Poprad, so they are mostly Slovak.
I really wonder for their roster. Hopefully They will not have such problems with financing as Czechoslovakian project Patriot in Budapest in past.

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05-26-2014, 01:21 PM
  #931
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Thank God, Crimea is dropped, such a forced and silly addition! Though Murmansk is exactly the town MHL should target, no matter in how poor of a shape hockey is in these northern outposts right now. It can pay off big eventually. Now lets wait for Spartak Arkhangelsk, they had a good school during soviet times and if r-hockey is any indication, there are plenty of Arkhangelsk kids playing for St.Petersburg's teams to fill couple of rosters.

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05-26-2014, 02:00 PM
  #932
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Thank God, Crimea is dropped, such a forced and silly addition! Though Murmansk is exactly the town MHL should target, no matter in how poor of a shape hockey is in these northern outposts right now. It can pay off big eventually. Now lets wait for Spartak Arkhangelsk, they had a good school during soviet times and if r-hockey is any indication, there are plenty of Arkhangelsk kids playing for St.Petersburg's teams to fill couple of rosters.
yeah, I agree...while our opinion may differ politically, on a sports matter, Crimea has no business in hockey.

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05-27-2014, 10:04 AM
  #933
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Interesting that Dmitry Efimov in an interview not long ago talked about Rostov (Tver Region), but the official release says the team is from Rostov-na-Donu (Rostov Region). They're like 800 or so miles apart
Rostov (Rostov Veliky) is in the Yaroslavl Oblast, which makes a bit more sense from the hockey standpoint. But it's still pretty weird, I don't think they have an arena for that.

Also speaking of Yaroslavl, Lokomitv is supposed to move its MHL-B team to Rybinsk this year.

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05-27-2014, 11:48 AM
  #934
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No its rostov on don! We have a team in rhl and will now have one in mhl b

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05-27-2014, 02:30 PM
  #935
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No its rostov on don! We have a team in rhl and will now have one in mhl b
How sure you are about the fact that adult team won't be disbanded in favor of a mhlb one?

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05-27-2014, 06:43 PM
  #936
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How sure you are about the fact that adult team won't be disbanded in favor of a mhlb one?
at this point, I doubt this will happen, the adult team's aspirations is VHL, but it's all on one guy Kuchinskas, so who knows. A junior Rostov team has been playing in the JHL for two years now, I guess, that's the building block for the MHL team.

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05-28-2014, 07:34 PM
  #937
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looks like Efimov may have jumped the gun. Kuchinsksas said, that he can't afford to carry both teams and needs city to participate. He's yet to have the meeting with the governor.

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06-05-2014, 10:51 AM
  #938
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Thank God, Crimea is dropped, such a forced and silly addition! Though Murmansk is exactly the town MHL should target, no matter in how poor of a shape hockey is in these northern outposts right now. It can pay off big eventually. Now lets wait for Spartak Arkhangelsk, they had a good school during soviet times and if r-hockey is any indication, there are plenty of Arkhangelsk kids playing for St.Petersburg's teams to fill couple of rosters.
I definitely agree. Its time to more seriously develop the Northwestern regions. There were a number of great players who came out of those regions during Soviet times (Kapustin, Zhluktov, Konstantinov, etc.). The league needs new sources of talent, and all areas should be developed.

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06-05-2014, 04:04 PM
  #939
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I definitely agree. Its time to more seriously develop the Northwestern regions. There were a number of great players who came out of those regions during Soviet times (Kapustin, Zhluktov, Konstantinov, etc.). The league needs new sources of talent, and all areas should be developed.
I also agree. Hockey should not be forced to southern Russia before it is better developed in northern regions where the environment is more natural in hockey (there is actually snow and ice on winters).

Murmansk should have great potential for hockey. It is a city of nearly half a million people that is located up north from arctic circle. All is needed is a little investment in hockey infrastructure (build a few rinks and organize kids hockey).

Murmansk is a great bandy city but hockey has no tradition there. Murmansk has produced a few good hockey players such as Vladimir Konstantinov and former Olympic champion Sergei Bautin, but the city has never had a team playing organized hockey at men's level.

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06-05-2014, 04:15 PM
  #940
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Actually Bautin is not from Murmansk but from Belarus. For some reason I had a thought he was from Murmansk.

Other Murmansk originated hockey players are Roman Lyashenko, Nikita Alexeev and Alexei Semenov.

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06-08-2014, 12:47 PM
  #941
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Actually Bautin is not from Murmansk but from Belarus. For some reason I had a thought he was from Murmansk.

Other Murmansk originated hockey players are Roman Lyashenko, Nikita Alexeev and Alexei Semenov.
Also, Sergei Fedorov (Fyodorov) moved to Apatity, in the Arctic Region near Murmansk, at age 9, when his father brought the family there to coach hockey. His younger brother Fedor was born in Apatity. As in all bandy towns, there is no reason why they couldn't also be great hockey towns. The KHL and MHL need to develop these areas in order to expand their talent base.

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06-08-2014, 03:16 PM
  #942
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As in all bandy towns, there is no reason why they couldn't also be great hockey towns. The KHL and MHL need to develop these areas in order to expand their talent base.
Agree 100% with this. But as much as I love Murmansk in MHL in order to expand the talant pool, Russian hockey must look at grass root level first. MHL won't turn it's players in pros if the "raw material" coming into league is useless in first place.

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06-08-2014, 04:58 PM
  #943
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Originally Posted by Yakushev72 View Post
Also, Sergei Fedorov (Fyodorov) moved to Apatity, in the Arctic Region near Murmansk, at age 9, when his father brought the family there to coach hockey. His younger brother Fedor was born in Apatity. As in all bandy towns, there is no reason why they couldn't also be great hockey towns. The KHL and MHL need to develop these areas in order to expand their talent base.
Bandy traditions and extremely cold climate won't be very helpful in growing the talent pool. Its depth rests mostly on indoor ice rinks and middle class families that are able to support young hockey players. Which is why the absolute #1 priority for growing the game in Russia must be the bigger cities. And as long as Yekaterinburg has only one school and hockey in Saratov is on the verge of collapse, any talks about developing hockey in Northern Russia appear to be off the mark.

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06-10-2014, 10:59 AM
  #944
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Bandy traditions and extremely cold climate won't be very helpful in growing the talent pool. Its depth rests mostly on indoor ice rinks and middle class families that are able to support young hockey players. Which is why the absolute #1 priority for growing the game in Russia must be the bigger cities. And as long as Yekaterinburg has only one school and hockey in Saratov is on the verge of collapse, any talks about developing hockey in Northern Russia appear to be off the mark.
Of course, you are absolutely correct. If the infrastructure to grow hockey doesn't exist in the big cities in milder winter climates, how will it grow in places where there are no rinks and kids and their parents can't afford to play? I believe there is reason to believe that young kids could really fall in love with hockey by watching KHL and international games on TV, and by playing makeshift games on the yard rinks with their buddies, but how does that lead to uncovering talent and directing it in ways that can lead to full player development?

The KHL, and Russian national teams for that matter, have a vested interest in increasing the availability of talented players who can attract fans to the seats and to have more competitive success, so it makes sense for the KHL to develop a comprehensive system to grow new players. The NHL has an extensive network of rinks and junior leagues in the non-hockey playing regions of the USA to "grow its own," so to speak. Also, the fact that Putin seems to be a bit of a fan makes the government perhaps more sympathetic to investing in hockey infrastructure. But if the investment doesn't come from somewhere, the KHL will remain a second-best league, and Russia will continue to be ranked No. 4 or 5 in the international seedings.

At the same time, you can't ignore any region for development - not Murmansk and not Yekaterinburg. Someone has to create the infrastructure that will allow talent to progress to its natural limit. You mention that it is cold in Murmansk (even colder in Yekaterinburg, for that matter), but apparently not too cold for kids to skate hours and hours and playing bandy outdoor, and not too cold for drunken old men to sit in the outdoor stadium seats at -30 C. Talent is another word for potential, and it exists everywhere.


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06-10-2014, 11:28 PM
  #945
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Of course, you are absolutely correct. If the infrastructure to grow hockey doesn't exist in the big cities in milder winter climates, how will it grow in places where there are no rinks and kids and their parents can't afford to play? I believe there is reason to believe that young kids could really fall in love with hockey by watching KHL and international games on TV, and by playing makeshift games on the yard rinks with their buddies, but how does that lead to uncovering talent and directing it in ways that can lead to full player development?

The KHL, and Russian national teams for that matter, have a vested interest in increasing the availability of talented players who can attract fans to the seats and to have more competitive success, so it makes sense for the KHL to develop a comprehensive system to grow new players. The NHL has an extensive network of rinks and junior leagues in the non-hockey playing regions of the USA to "grow its own," so to speak. Also, the fact that Putin seems to be a bit of a fan makes the government perhaps more sympathetic to investing in hockey infrastructure. But if the investment doesn't come from somewhere, the KHL will remain a second-best league, and Russia will continue to be ranked No. 4 or 5 in the international seedings.

At the same time, you can't ignore any region for development - not Murmansk and not Yekaterinburg. Someone has to create the infrastructure that will allow talent to progress to its natural limit. You mention that it is cold in Murmansk (even colder in Yekaterinburg, for that matter), but apparently not too cold for kids to skate hours and hours and playing bandy outdoor, and not too cold for drunken old men to sit in the outdoor stadium seats at -30 C. Talent is another word for potential, and it exists everywhere.
You can't do that without setting priorities, we're talking about a really big country with really big infrastrucutre issues and relatively limited financial capabilities. Russian eceonomy and demographics has been trending towards the big cities for the last couple of decades, that's where you put your money first.

-30 behind the Arctic circle is pretty hellish btw, people in Yekaterinburg with their continental climate would have no idea. Also kids today prefer playing video games at their homes during winter, it's rather hard to compete with that.

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06-14-2014, 02:18 PM
  #946
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You can't do that without setting priorities, we're talking about a really big country with really big infrastrucutre issues and relatively limited financial capabilities. Russian eceonomy and demographics has been trending towards the big cities for the last couple of decades, that's where you put your money first.

-30 behind the Arctic circle is pretty hellish btw, people in Yekaterinburg with their continental climate would have no idea. Also kids today prefer playing video games at their homes during winter, it's rather hard to compete with that.
What do you mean that "people in Yekaterinburg with their continental climate would have no idea?" Its colder in Yekaterinburg in the winter than it is in Murmansk! Sorry, I don't buy the idea that kids can play bandy and watch bandy matches in the winter, but they can't play hockey. As we've said, several top-flight players have already come from Murmansk, just not enough.

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06-15-2014, 11:34 AM
  #947
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What do you mean that "people in Yekaterinburg with their continental climate would have no idea?" Its colder in Yekaterinburg in the winter than it is in Murmansk! Sorry, I don't buy the idea that kids can play bandy and watch bandy matches in the winter, but they can't play hockey. As we've said, several top-flight players have already come from Murmansk, just not enough.
Humid polar winters are actually harder to withstand, the social benefits for people residing the Far North exist not without a reason. But that's offtopic.

You're missing the point. Bandy isn't that big in Murmansk, it's not a popular spectator sport and it's hard to lure parents into sports schools. Russian bandy has been in stable decline for decades, and its outdoor nature played a major role in that. You also won't see as many hockey players from Murmansk, simply bceause there are obvious problems with infrastructure and lack of specialists, as well serious demographic issues.

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06-16-2014, 02:54 PM
  #948
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Humid polar winters are actually harder to withstand, the social benefits for people residing the Far North exist not without a reason. But that's offtopic.

You're missing the point. Bandy isn't that big in Murmansk, it's not a popular spectator sport and it's hard to lure parents into sports schools. Russian bandy has been in stable decline for decades, and its outdoor nature played a major role in that. You also won't see as many hockey players from Murmansk, simply bceause there are obvious problems with infrastructure and lack of specialists, as well serious demographic issues.
Lack of infrastructure isn't a mysterious point to grasp. Without a minimum infrastructure, there is a greatly diminished (but not abolished) chance of developing hockey talent. That said, the Soviets proved that you could develop great hockey players without significant infrastructure. It shouldn't be outside the financial range of a city the size of Murmansk to build a couple of small rinks that could be used, among other things, to house hockey schools. Its not that huge an investment, if KHL interests would choose to take it on. That region of the Arctic should be within the realm of SKA, for example.

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06-16-2014, 02:58 PM
  #949
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Is it true that young people are moving away from Murmansk? I think I read something about it a while ago. Murmansk is overpopulated for a city in that climate and there are no jobs for young people there. So they emigrate to St.Petersburg, Moscow and some of them abroad.

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06-16-2014, 03:19 PM
  #950
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Lack of infrastructure isn't a mysterious point to grasp. Without a minimum infrastructure, there is a greatly diminished (but not abolished) chance of developing hockey talent. That said, the Soviets proved that you could develop great hockey players without significant infrastructure. It shouldn't be outside the financial range of a city the size of Murmansk to build a couple of small rinks that could be used, among other things, to house hockey schools. Its not that huge an investment, if KHL interests would choose to take it on. That region of the Arctic should be within the realm of SKA, for example.
And here we are, enjoying the legacy of underveloped Soviet infrastructure. Trying to apply that system to modern day realities is just silly. Soviet Union and its hockey are dead, put them to rest.

For a city in the size of Murmansk even small rinks are a serious challenge. You can trust me on that. And that's like the least important thing to care for when you have stuff like roads, airports and public housing on the table.

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