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Home/Road plus-minus splits

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01-17-2012, 01:33 PM
  #1
overpass
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Home/Road plus-minus splits

I've compiled the home/road splits in plus-minus of players since 1987-88.

Plus-minus is affected by the situations in which coaches play players. And the fact that home teams get last change means that coaches have to use players differently at home and on the road.

I'll post the numbers in a day or so. But before I post them, can I ask for some guesses from the bright minds here at HOH? Just to see what our intuition and experience as hockey fans comes up with, before seeing the numbers.

1. Which longtime players/stars since 1987-88 had the biggest positive differential between home plus-minus and road plus-minus?

2. Which longtime players/stars since 1987-88 had the smallest positive (or largest negative) differential between home plus-minus and road plus-minus?

I'm looking for guesses uninformed by the actual numbers here, so please don't look them up and post them.

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01-17-2012, 01:38 PM
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tarheelhockey
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I'm going to guess that guys like Pronger, Chara and Stevens have the largest. Their coaches bent over backwards to get them matched up against the right opponents, so one would expect the home-road line change rules to have a greater impact on them. Their numbers should still be quite good, but perhaps less good.

Smallest? No idea. I bet it's somebody random.

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01-17-2012, 01:41 PM
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TheDevilMadeMe
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When did all the rinks become standard size? I would imagine that skilled forwards with small home arenas might have better plus/minuses on the road.

I want to agree with tarheel about shutdown defensemen, but I know at least the Devils would often purposely ice the puck to make a change if Stevens wasn't out there when they wanted him on the road. So I'm curious how different it could be.

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01-17-2012, 02:11 PM
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LeBlondeDemon10
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Coffey, Gretzky, Lemieux

Carbonneau, Stevens, Yzerman

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01-17-2012, 03:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tarheelhockey View Post
I'm going to guess that guys like Pronger, Chara and Stevens have the largest. Their coaches bent over backwards to get them matched up against the right opponents, so one would expect the home-road line change rules to have a greater impact on them. Their numbers should still be quite good, but perhaps less good.

Smallest? No idea. I bet it's somebody random.
Players in general usually have better stats at home.

--Smallest (better stats on the road compared to home)
Thus, in order to have as good stats away as at home means that a player probably have had relatively hard matchups (or whatever) at home, while having easier on the road.

--Largest (better stats at home compared to on the road
The opposite ones obviously are this season's Ryan Nugent Hopkins, who at home may have played in a relatively sheltered environment, as opposed to on the road, and thus may have "easy" time. These players may need certain conditions to be met in order to shine, which can often only be fulfilled at home, where their coach can match them against the opponents that suits them best.

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01-17-2012, 04:55 PM
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I say Bourque and Lidstrom will have little or no difference between their home and road records. They play all situations regardless of where the game is.

I also guess that forwards will generally have a higher disparity than defencemen.

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01-17-2012, 07:19 PM
  #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by reckoning View Post
I say Bourque and Lidstrom will have little or no difference between their home and road records. They play all situations regardless of where the game is.
While I agree that this seems likely on the whole, this year Lidstrom is +22 at home and +1 on the road, reflecting the Wings' excellent home performances and their struggles on the road. But this kind of split is atypical for Detroit (and counterbalanced by last season, when they dominated on the road).

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01-17-2012, 10:42 PM
  #8
overpass
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Here are the results for defencemen. I'll post forwards later since I haven't quite finished them.

There's still a fair bit of variation in these numbers, which makes it difficult to draw firm conclusions on any individual player. But maybe we can pick out some trends from the overall picture.

Player GP Home+/- Road+/- Diff+/- Per-82 EV% PP% SH%
Larry Murphy 1064 158 -20 178 14 40% 66% 31%
Phil Housley 1113 62 -118 180 13 39% 87% 11%
Paul Coffey 877 78 -55 133 12 44% 80% 26%
Jamie Macoun 808 98 -23 121 12 39% 10% 51%
Al MacInnis 1126 236 72 164 12 40% 87% 43%
Tommy Albelin 952 94 -42 136 12 29% 25% 28%
Gerald Diduck 827 99 -16 115 11 32% 16% 34%
Fredrik Olausson 950 52 -77 129 11 33% 62% 23%
Brian Leetch 1205 93 -68 161 11 45% 87% 50%
Scott Stevens 1250 243 78 165 11 42% 38% 62%
Alexei Zhitnik 1085 41 -94 135 10 38% 55% 37%
Jaroslav Spacek 861 76 -31 107 10 34% 47% 35%
Karlis Skrastins 832 29 -74 103 10 34% 3% 51%
Nicklas Lidstrom 1539 318 134 184 10 40% 72% 52%
James Patrick 1040 101 -13 114 9 31% 38% 35%
Chris Chelios 1453 252 93 159 9 38% 51% 59%
Pavel Kubina 941 0 -102 102 9 36% 50% 36%
Sylvain Cote 1035 84 -27 111 9 36% 34% 35%
Eric Desjardins 1143 159 39 120 9 39% 52% 47%
Sergei Zubov 1068 130 18 112 9 42% 82% 33%
Cory Sarich 855 40 -49 89 9 29% 2% 37%
Dave Manson 1040 50 -54 104 8 37% 32% 35%
Garry Galley 974 55 -41 96 8 34% 51% 31%
Grant Ledyard 840 44 -37 81 8 30% 31% 26%
Bret Hedican 1039 38 -61 99 8 35% 23% 34%
Petr Svoboda 831 114 38 76 7 32% 40% 30%
Rob Blake 1270 56 -60 116 7 37% 66% 50%
Scott Hannan 872 48 -31 79 7 36% 12% 45%
Kevin Hatcher 998 42 -47 89 7 42% 61% 52%
Jassen Cullimore 812 13 -58 71 7 29% 5% 36%
Todd Gill 921 -7 -87 80 7 34% 25% 30%
Wade Redden 994 124 38 86 7 37% 50% 39%
Sergei Gonchar 1098 66 -28 94 7 39% 76% 21%
Patrice Brisebois 1009 43 -42 85 7 34% 51% 32%
Roman Hamrlik 1350 27 -86 113 7 39% 57% 36%
Sylvain Lefebvre 945 93 15 78 7 33% 8% 43%
Don Sweeney 1115 102 10 92 7 34% 10% 39%
Darryl Sydor 1291 63 -42 105 7 33% 40% 25%
Jyrki Lumme 985 78 -2 80 7 35% 48% 37%
Ken Daneyko 1148 94 1 93 7 30% 2% 43%
Ulf Samuelsson 881 107 36 71 7 35% 16% 43%
Adam Foote 1154 96 3 93 7 36% 17% 52%
Scott Lachance 819 -5 -71 66 7 34% 15% 42%
Stephane Quintal 1037 -3 -86 83 7 36% 13% 41%
Murray Baron 988 10 -67 77 6 32% 3% 44%
Chris Phillips 990 74 0 74 6 34% 16% 40%
Bryan Marchment 926 49 -18 67 6 34% 5% 25%
Steve Duchesne 1038 77 3 74 6 36% 65% 31%
Kimmo Timonen 937 50 -16 66 6 32% 75% 37%
Scott Niedermayer 1263 127 40 87 6 39% 64% 40%
Aaron Ward 839 8 -49 57 6 31% 4% 37%
Robyn Regehr 869 38 -21 59 6 35% 15% 49%
Gary Suter 997 96 29 67 6 37% 81% 31%
Greg de Vries 878 41 -18 59 6 35% 6% 31%
Mattias Norstrom 903 34 -26 60 5 33% 8% 49%
Adrian Aucoin 1047 56 -13 69 5 34% 53% 41%
Curtis Leschyshyn 1033 8 -60 68 5 32% 17% 37%
Derek Morris 986 14 -50 64 5 35% 46% 36%
Keith Carney 1018 115 49 66 5 35% 7% 43%
Terry Carkner 806 25 -26 51 5 32% 16% 45%
Mathieu Schneider 1289 73 -7 80 5 37% 69% 31%
Ray Bourque 1032 149 85 64 5 42% 88% 62%
Joe Reekie 843 99 47 52 5 35% 3% 42%
Derian Hatcher 1045 68 6 62 5 41% 18% 55%
Ed Jovanovski 1062 -6 -69 63 5 38% 46% 25%
Calle Johansson 1109 61 -4 65 5 33% 47% 45%
Glen Wesley 1457 74 -8 82 5 32% 39% 43%
Brendan Witt 890 -21 -70 49 5 32% 1% 47%
Tom Poti 808 45 1 44 4 35% 47% 42%
Luke Richardson 1417 -22 -97 75 4 31% 3% 38%
Craig Ludwig 880 58 12 46 4 32% 1% 51%
Mattias Ohlund 909 19 -25 44 4 39% 42% 45%
Bob Rouse 850 -1 -42 41 4 34% 7% 41%
Marc Bergevin 994 -11 -56 45 4 30% 5% 44%
Bryan Mccabe 1135 42 -8 50 4 38% 55% 41%
Jason Smith 1008 34 -8 42 3 34% 1% 45%
Doug Bodger 851 5 -26 31 3 32% 60% 44%
Ruslan Salei 917 3 -28 31 3 35% 20% 39%
Jay Mckee 802 41 14 27 3 31% 5% 47%
Hal Gill 1034 37 5 32 3 32% 0% 50%
Sean O'Donnell 1204 64 27 37 3 31% 7% 43%
Dave Ellett 891 -11 -38 27 2 36% 57% 35%
Craig Rivet 923 9 -13 22 2 31% 21% 31%
Teppo Numminen 1372 44 12 32 2 34% 48% 46%
Darius Kasparaitis 863 28 11 17 2 32% 5% 38%
Chris Pronger 1167 102 81 21 1 39% 67% 54%
Gord Murphy 862 -34 -49 15 1 35% 43% 42%
Zdeno Chara 968 79 64 15 1 40% 42% 52%
Tomas Kaberle 947 14 4 10 1 37% 69% 35%
Sandis Ozolinsh 875 -18 -26 8 1 41% 68% 19%
Sean Hill 876 -19 -27 8 1 34% 40% 37%
Bill Houlder 846 15 16 -1 0 34% 27% 44%
Brian Rafalski 833 88 90 -2 0 38% 67% 22%
Lyle Odelein 1056 5 24 -19 -1 33% 16% 27%
Eric Weinrich 1157 15 41 -26 -2 36% 34% 37%
Total 96137 5731 -1371 7102 6 35% 36% 39%

It's sorted by (Home plus-minus - road plus-minus)/(career games played)*82.

I've included EV%, PP%, and SH%, to help eyeball the table to see what types of players were more successful at home, or more successful on the road. They are estimates based on on-ice goals as a percentage of the team's goals on a per-game basis.

I originally ran these numbers because I checked Larry Murphy's splits and thought they looked high, but had no way to put it into perspective. It turns out that Murphy's home/road splits were pretty large.

Interesting to see Lidstrom with the largest absolute difference (at the moment when I ran the numbers, anyway) and near the top on a per-game basis.

Tarheelhockey guessed Pronger, Chara, and Stevens would have large differentials. Stevens did, Pronger and Chara didn't.

Leblondedemon10 named Coffey as someone who would have a large split. Correct.

Bourque and Lidstrom? Bourque's split was pretty average. Lidstrom's was large.

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01-17-2012, 10:47 PM
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TheDevilMadeMe
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I really don't know what can be interpreted from those numbers. The guys at the top are a mix of offensive defensemen, defensive defensemen, superstars, and bottom pairing defensemen.

Seems almost random.

Can you find a pattern in it?

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01-17-2012, 10:49 PM
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This may be helpful, but probably not - Tommy Albelin was Scott Stevens' even strength partner for a little while in the late 90s (though usually he was a bottom pairing guy).

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01-17-2012, 11:01 PM
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overpass
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheDevilMadeMe View Post
I really don't know what can be interpreted from those numbers. The guys at the top are a mix of offensive defensemen, defensive defensemen, superstars, and bottom pairing defensemen.

Seems almost random.

Can you find a pattern in it?
Yeah, that's partly why I posted it here - and also why I asked for opinions before posting.

Some of it is random variation. The rest may come down to individual coaching strategies, which are difficult to find overall trends in.

There are a few offence-first guys at the top, in terms of being more successful at home. Murphy, Housley, Coffey. MacInnis (and his partner Macoun, who was not offence-first.) Olausson. Leetch.

But then why were Ozolinsh and Rafalski almost equally good on the road? Rafalski is especially strange, considering his most frequent partners have been Stevens and Lidstrom.

Pronger, Chara, and Gill doing almost as well on the road as at home may be a trend.

Correlations between the per-82 diff and some different numbers:
EV% - 0.21
PP% - 0.20
SH% - -0.08

Meaning that power play guys did slightly better at home and penalty killers did slightly worse at home, relative to each other.

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01-18-2012, 02:09 AM
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If I remember right, power plays are more common for the home team. Thus, players that are used a lot on PP are unfavoured +/- wise, as they risk allowing more goals while playing PP at home than on the road. The opposite with players used much more on the PK than on the PP, who gets more PK time on the road, which is good for their stats +/- wise. (I'm not sure whether that is cancelled out by other factors, though. It seems as if it does, if I read the results right.)

Interesting listing, by the way. What data did you use? Was it season summaries or game by game data?

(And again, I hope it's known that the estimated ES%, PP% and SH% aren't very reliable. If I remember right, they are on average wrong by 6-7 percentage units, so 20 % may be 13 % or 27 %, or something closer to, or even farther away from, 20 %. If using them to rank defencemen players within a team based on on estimated ice time, they are often wrong too, if so usually by one spot but sometimes more. No harm meant, I just still think it would be better to mention it.)


Last edited by plusandminus: 01-18-2012 at 02:17 AM.
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01-18-2012, 06:54 AM
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overpass
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Quote:
Originally Posted by plusandminus View Post
If I remember right, power plays are more common for the home team. Thus, players that are used a lot on PP are unfavoured +/- wise, as they risk allowing more goals while playing PP at home than on the road. The opposite with players used much more on the PK than on the PP, who gets more PK time on the road, which is good for their stats +/- wise. (I'm not sure whether that is cancelled out by other factors, though. It seems as if it does, if I read the results right.)

Interesting listing, by the way. What data did you use? Was it season summaries or game by game data?

(And again, I hope it's known that the estimated ES%, PP% and SH% aren't very reliable. If I remember right, they are on average wrong by 6-7 percentage units, so 20 % may be 13 % or 27 %, or something closer to, or even farther away from, 20 %. If using them to rank defencemen players within a team based on on estimated ice time, they are often wrong too, if so usually by one spot but sometimes more. No harm meant, I just still think it would be better to mention it.)
The data is from hockey-reference.com's splits. It's easily available for each individual player, I just compiled the list.

Could you post a link to your work indicating that the estimated ES%, PP%, and SH% are wrong by an average of 6-7 percentage points? I think your statement is completely wrong. I've never seen you test those numbers on a career level in the past, only on a single season level.

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01-18-2012, 06:59 AM
  #14
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Here's the forward data. The list isn't complete, I didn't get to running all the names. But it should give a pretty good idea of whether there is something there.

Player GP Home+/- Road+/- Diff+/- Per-82 EV% PP% SH%
Player GP Home+/- Road+/- Diff+/- Per-82 EV% PP% SH%
Mario Lemieux 700 161 -18 179 21 45% 94% 34%
Wayne Gretzky 855 71 -65 136 13 44% 79% 28%
Luc Robitaille 1352 146 -56 202 12 33% 59% 4%
Bryan Smolinski 1056 95 -49 144 11 30% 37% 23%
Doug Gilmour 1162 141 -13 154 11 35% 64% 34%
Daniel Alfredsson 1056 138 0 138 11 34% 70% 20%
Gary Roberts 1192 188 35 153 11 31% 38% 11%
Claude Lemieux 1120 81 -61 142 10 29% 46% 13%
Miroslav Satan 1050 75 -55 130 10 31% 53% 16%
Theoren Fleury 1084 137 8 129 10 36% 64% 24%
Sergei Fedorov 1249 204 57 147 10 32% 58% 31%
Doug Weight 1238 42 -100 142 9 31% 68% 9%
Joe Sakic 1378 87 -57 144 9 38% 79% 25%
Paul Kariya 989 67 -36 103 9 38% 78% 16%
Martin Straka 954 83 -16 99 9 33% 48% 15%
Mike Modano 1499 133 -19 152 8 33% 62% 25%
Brian Rolston 1186 90 -30 120 8 26% 49% 31%
Mark Recchi 1652 82 -82 164 8 35% 65% 17%
Jaromir Jagr 1273 202 83 119 8 41% 68% 8%
Martin Gelinas 1273 84 -32 116 7 27% 19% 12%
Peter Bondra 1081 86 -12 98 7 33% 56% 14%
Alexander Mogilny 990 85 -4 89 7 35% 60% 13%
Kirk Muller 1113 4 -92 96 7 30% 42% 28%
Bill Guerin 1263 79 -28 107 7 30% 51% 3%
Ryan Smyth 1069 32 -58 90 7 33% 62% 11%
Trevor Linden 1382 26 -90 116 7 28% 46% 33%
Jason Arnott 1172 89 -9 98 7 33% 59% 5%
Ray Whitney 1147 4 -91 95 7 31% 64% 6%
Vyacheslav Kozlov 1182 96 0 96 7 29% 45% 8%
Dave Andreychuk 1297 58 -47 105 7 28% 62% 14%
Brett Hull 1264 63 -39 102 7 37% 71% 16%
Guy Carbonneau 923 91 17 74 7 24% 4% 50%
Mats Sundin 1346 90 -17 107 7 35% 64% 24%
Ray Ferraro 1058 -11 -93 82 6 31% 42% 1%
Scott Young 1181 25 -65 90 6 26% 52% 15%
Adam Oates 1223 76 -17 93 6 39% 76% 29%
Pierre Turgeon 1294 117 22 95 6 33% 62% 12%
Geoff Sanderson 1104 -11 -89 78 6 28% 43% 7%
Patrick Marleau 1077 52 -22 74 6 33% 51% 13%
Mark Messier 1186 83 4 79 5 35% 63% 44%
Shayne Corson 1098 54 -17 71 5 31% 46% 27%
Joe Thornton 995 106 42 64 5 36% 66% 11%
Brendan Shanahan 1524 124 27 97 5 32% 59% 14%
Peter Forsberg 708 141 97 44 5 36% 70% 22%
Steve Yzerman 1223 159 85 74 5 36% 67% 42%
Ron Francis 1313 60 -17 77 5 34% 71% 27%
Alexei Kovalev 1302 23 -53 76 5 33% 57% 11%
Michal Handzus 844 36 -13 49 5 26% 32% 41%
Stu Barnes 1136 20 -44 64 5 28% 34% 27%
Pavel Datsyuk 706 123 84 39 5 33% 55% 13%
Andrew Brunette 1032 -9 -66 57 5 28% 61% 1%
Todd Marchant 1195 23 -43 66 5 24% 13% 47%
Scott Mellanby 1358 16 -59 75 5 27% 45% 3%
Keith Tkachuk 1201 49 -16 65 4 35% 65% 8%
John Leclair 967 128 76 52 4 35% 53% 1%
Vincent Lecavalier 978 -31 -81 50 4 35% 63% 10%
Joe Nieuwendyk 1248 108 47 61 4 31% 55% 9%
Vincent Damphousse 1298 39 -24 63 4 32% 58% 20%
Steve Thomas 1074 50 -2 52 4 31% 42% 3%
Todd Bertuzzi 1060 10 -41 51 4 33% 48% 1%
Jarome Iginla 1106 56 3 53 4 38% 64% 13%
Teemu Selanne 1259 80 23 57 4 36% 74% 5%
Rod Brind'Amour 1484 14 -53 67 4 33% 50% 45%
Bobby Holik 1314 87 28 59 4 26% 32% 8%
Glen Murray 1009 29 -15 44 4 33% 39% 10%
Markus Naslund 1117 27 -21 48 4 30% 50% 5%
Cliff Ronning 1095 46 0 46 3 26% 59% 1%
Tony Amonte 1174 72 24 48 3 32% 50% 21%
Radek Dvorak 1118 17 -23 40 3 28% 19% 26%
Owen Nolan 1200 1 -41 42 3 30% 47% 23%
Rick Tocchet 931 40 8 32 3 34% 56% 7%
Dave Reid 869 41 12 29 3 20% 5% 37%
Pat Verbeek 1111 42 6 36 3 31% 55% 5%
Mike Peca 864 45 21 24 2 27% 32% 44%
Shane Doan 1165 3 -26 29 2 31% 46% 11%
Alexei Yashin 850 -31 -52 21 2 36% 68% 9%
Rob Niedermayer 1153 -48 -75 27 2 26% 29% 28%
Adam Graves 1152 0 -25 25 2 29% 35% 27%
Kris Draper 1157 46 26 20 1 20% 2% 34%
Jeremy Roenick 1363 87 66 21 1 32% 60% 19%
Stephane Yelle 991 10 -3 13 1 19% 5% 41%
Craig Conroy 1009 55 43 12 1 27% 22% 40%
Eric Lindros 760 112 103 9 1 42% 68% 14%
Jay Pandolfo 819 2 4 -2 0 21% 2% 49%


Last edited by overpass: 01-18-2012 at 07:43 PM.
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01-18-2012, 09:33 AM
  #15
plusandminus
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Originally Posted by overpass View Post
Could you post a link to your work indicating that the estimated ES%, PP%, and SH% are wrong by an average of 6-7 percentage points? I think your statement is completely wrong. I've never seen you test those numbers on a career level in the past, only on a single season level.
Yes, I did it for a single seasons. I can post the results later.

Let's say a player factually plays SH 40 % of the time the team plays SH. Being on ice for 34 % of the SHGA indicate he has done better than team average, while being on ice for 46 % of the SHGA, indicates he's done worse than team average. To me that makes difference. According to your stats, the "worse than team average player" will be awarded with "46 %", while the "better than team average player" will be punished down to "34 %".


If combining more than one season, I think the error margins will be smaller. I can look into it later, if I have the data.
(I think I'm still missing situational seasonal icetimes and GF GA for players. For some sad reason, it seems factual seasonal player data for ESGF, ESGA, PPGF, PPGA, SHGF, SHGA is not to be found, and I don't like to make assumptions/estimations if can be avoided. I now use game by game data, from HSP and hockeydb combined with data from nhl.com. (I do want game by game data anyway, as I want to be able to distinguish EN situations from non-EN situtations, as well as see details as well as how combinations of players did when playing together.) It takes time and energy to get it into my database and then even more to correct errors and double check things.)

To get back to your percentages... Wouldn't it be great to know just how reliable they are? Wouldn't it be good to perhaps find ways to fine tune methods used for calculating them and other stats? Your frequent mention of "easy" and "hard" icetimes is one example, where it is being assumed that players with high SH percentages play against more difficult opposition (when playing SH) than those with low percentages. On the other hand, they probably also play with the best available teammates, which may in the overall context cancel things out. ?
Your tables with percentages and R-On / R-Off are pretty frequently used here on the board, and seem to be used to draw conclusions about players. I feel the need to sometimes point out some things about them. Even though it probably isn't appreciated here, I do think my intentions are good.


Last edited by plusandminus: 01-18-2012 at 09:40 AM. Reason: spelling/grammar
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01-18-2012, 10:19 AM
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Forsberg leads all forwards on +/- on the road. Yzerman 2nd and Datsyuk 3rd.
Edit: I missed Eric Lindros, who is 1 st, followed by Forsberg, Yzerman and Datsyuk.

Any thoughts regarding "Sakic vs Forsberg"? Did Sakic seem to have gotten easier minutes? (I personally don't make that conclusion, as I think other things may affect the numbers too.)


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01-18-2012, 10:35 AM
  #17
tarheelhockey
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Quote:
Originally Posted by plusandminus View Post
Forsberg leads all forwards on +/- on the road. Yzerman 2nd and Datsyuk 3rd.

Any thoughts regarding "Sakic vs Forsberg"? Did Sakic seem to have gotten easier minutes? (I personally don't make that conclusion, as I think other things may affect the numbers too.)
All other things equal, wouldn't this actually mean that Forsberg was getting the easier matchups?

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01-18-2012, 10:48 AM
  #18
overpass
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Quote:
Originally Posted by plusandminus View Post
Forsberg leads all forwards on +/- on the road. Yzerman 2nd and Datsyuk 3rd.

Any thoughts regarding "Sakic vs Forsberg"? Did Sakic seem to have gotten easier minutes? (I personally don't make that conclusion, as I think other things may affect the numbers too.)
Actually, Eric Lindros was first in road plus-minus.

Regarding Sakic vs Forsberg, I think it is at least a piece of evidence in favour of Forsberg. It isn't conclusive, of course. Like you say there may be other things going on beyond matchups. Coaches can still control offensive/defensive zone faceoffs, linemates, etc.

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01-18-2012, 07:02 PM
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As it is, Lidstrom has the best +- on the road of the listed defenseman, even with his relatively large split. That is still very impressive. Bourque might have had a larger split in his younger days, but we don't have that data.

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01-18-2012, 07:48 PM
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overpass
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Originally Posted by LeBlondeDemon10 View Post
Coffey, Gretzky, Lemieux
Excellent guess!

Lemieux's splits were surprisingly large. Could it have been that travel took more of a toll on him than most players? Or was it the different matchups and coaching strategies?

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01-18-2012, 09:02 PM
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Excellent guess!

Lemieux's splits were surprisingly large. Could it have been that travel took more of a toll on him than most players? Or was it the different matchups and coaching strategies?
Receiving team's and coaches of those type of players, have a matchup and strategy against them and it's easier to play specific player's when they are on the ice at home, because you have the last change up.

Also team's tend to have more penalty called for them at home (referee influenced by the crowd maybe), and this could me even more true for star's player. Maybe defensive team could abuse more the superstar's when they are on the road.

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01-24-2012, 04:38 PM
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LeBlondeDemon10
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Excellent guess!

Lemieux's splits were surprisingly large. Could it have been that travel took more of a toll on him than most players? Or was it the different matchups and coaching strategies?
The only theory I have is that those forwards or combination of forwards (I think we would need to look at line mates too) that typically do not back-check, get burned more on the road than at home. This goes for offensive defensemen too. This would be a result of the line match ups as offensive lines on the road would be playing against the home teams top checking line. Do checking lines score more at home? Maybe.

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