HFBoards

Go Back   HFBoards > General Hockey Discussion > The Rink
Mobile Hockey's Future Become a Sponsor Site Rules Support Forum vBookie Page 2
Notices

The Rink For the not so ready for prime-time players, coaches, referees, and the people that have to live with them. Discuss experiences in local leagues, coaching tips, equipment, and training.

A sort of skate sharpening question

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old
09-23-2016, 05:57 PM
  #1
Bondoao1
Registered User
 
Bondoao1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: SoCal
Posts: 422
vCash: 500
A sort of skate sharpening question

I have a question sort of regarding skate sharpening.

First you will need to know some important info. I played hockey (Ice and roller) from 8 yrs old till I was 28. At that time I was sidelined with a head injury, and until this past January (10 years later) I hadn't set foot on the ice. In the past 10 years I gained some weight, which is why I think I had so much trouble with 1/2" hollow when I first started skating again.

I used 1/2" all my life till I had to stop which is why I went back to it. but in that time I went from 155lbs to 200lbs.

When I had so much trouble turning and stopping, I switched up to 5/8" hollow. That helped dramatically, and I can skate almost as good as I used to except for one thing.

When I try to stop, most of the time I still get a lot of chatter in my skates. Some times (very rare) I do stop correctly.
I was thinking of going with a 3/4" hollow, but I'm concerned it will affect my cornering.
I thought maybe my technique is to blame but I have been stopping the same way for 20 years before.

Any input into my situation will be greatly appreciated.

Bondoao1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-25-2016, 08:25 AM
  #2
Crosbyfan
Registered User
 
Crosbyfan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 10,209
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bondoao1 View Post
I have a question sort of regarding skate sharpening.

First you will need to know some important info. I played hockey (Ice and roller) from 8 yrs old till I was 28. At that time I was sidelined with a head injury, and until this past January (10 years later) I hadn't set foot on the ice. In the past 10 years I gained some weight, which is why I think I had so much trouble with 1/2" hollow when I first started skating again.

I used 1/2" all my life till I had to stop which is why I went back to it. but in that time I went from 155lbs to 200lbs.

When I had so much trouble turning and stopping, I switched up to 5/8" hollow. That helped dramatically, and I can skate almost as good as I used to except for one thing.

When I try to stop, most of the time I still get a lot of chatter in my skates. Some times (very rare) I do stop correctly.
I was thinking of going with a 3/4" hollow, but I'm concerned it will affect my cornering.
I thought maybe my technique is to blame but I have been stopping the same way for 20 years before.

Any input into my situation will be greatly appreciated.
How does the 5/8 work after a few skates, when they don't quite yet need resharpening?

Crosbyfan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-27-2016, 04:14 PM
  #3
Bondoao1
Registered User
 
Bondoao1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: SoCal
Posts: 422
vCash: 500
I have 5 pick up games on my last sharpening and they still feel the same as when they were first sharpened.

Bondoao1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
10-03-2016, 05:33 PM
  #4
Bondoao1
Registered User
 
Bondoao1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: SoCal
Posts: 422
vCash: 500
Ok, after playing in my 6th pickup game since my last sharpening, I am actually able to stop a bit better without changing technique at all. I think as my skates are getting dull, I'ts making it easier to stop, yet I did not experience any issues with cornering.

So does this mean I should try 3/4" hollow next time?

Bondoao1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
10-04-2016, 05:51 AM
  #5
Fremitus Borealis
Flügelstürmer.
 
Fremitus Borealis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: The Slot
Country: Austria
Posts: 9,185
vCash: 500
Good question, which I'm curious about the answer to. I had always just used the default 1/2" sharpening, but recently noticed that it always took a few skates to feel "dialed in", if that makes sense, so this past time at their recommendation I had them do 9/16". It actually felt pretty good right from the start (stopping was especially easier), so I'm thinking of making this my new standard... though I'm really wondering if I should be getting them sharpened more often now, just because I don't want them to get dull enough where pushing off is iffy. I rely a lot on my speed, so if I can't get that first step as efficiently, my game will suffer.

Fremitus Borealis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
10-10-2016, 02:05 AM
  #6
bhd1223
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Louisville, KY
Country: United States
Posts: 40
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bondoao1 View Post
Ok, after playing in my 6th pickup game since my last sharpening, I am actually able to stop a bit better without changing technique at all. I think as my skates are getting dull, I'ts making it easier to stop, yet I did not experience any issues with cornering.

So does this mean I should try 3/4" hollow next time?
First I'd say make sure you are actually getting what you asked for which I assume you are since you mentioned noticing a difference in the first post. It can't hurt to try 3/4" and it's the only way you'll know if it will work for you. I can tell you I switched to a 3/4" hollow recently and I can turn just as tight as before, but obviously after a few skates they need a resharpen as they "dull" a bit quicker than the previous 1/2" I was on. Those usually started to feel comfortable at about the point I sharpen now.

One thing you note about chattering on hockey stops, I've always heard this means you have too much bite for your technique/pressure. Basically, you really need to press harder with your legs to dig in and not chatter with a smaller hollow. I would recommend you try the 3/4" hollow and see how it feels. You may fall in love with it like I did, but I am skating at a place with really soft ice for now. I plan on trying to go back to a 5/8" once the short winter hits if the ice hardens up a bit.

Take all that for what it's worth. I'm no expert, just some random fella on the internet.

bhd1223 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
10-10-2016, 10:28 AM
  #7
MegaAlf
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 102
vCash: 500
I would think 5/8 is good for your weight. I'm light at 155 and tried 5/8 and my skates wouldn't dig into the ice well enough for quick starts. I go with 7/16.

MegaAlf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
10-10-2016, 10:48 AM
  #8
Rookie109
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Winnipeg, MB, Canada
Country: Canada
Posts: 257
vCash: 500
I had 11/16 all summer because at my home rink for summer hockey, that's what the guy suggested I try. I'm about 6'3 and 192 pounds so it let's me stay on top of the ice for glide. However, I recently noticed my skating was getting slower over time and the edges were wearing down, so it was time for a new sharpening.

So, I switched back to Flat bottom V sharpening at 92/75 which for the one skate I tried them, I really liked it. I've had it many times at different flat bottom V patterns, I usually like a little more glide. It is worth trying out, at least a couple different cuts to see how you skate with extra speed and a very responsive edge for turning (flat bottom v supposedly gives you both).

Check it out:
https://blackstonesport.com/technology/

Rookie109 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Forum Jump


Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:40 PM.

monitoring_string = "e4251c93e2ba248d29da988d93bf5144"

vBulletin Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
HFBoards.com is a property of CraveOnline Media, LLC, an Evolve Media, LLC company. @2017 All Rights Reserved.