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Old
04-05-2012, 08:54 PM
  #1
drivesrf
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pass too quickly

So what do/did you all do to get over your allergy to holding on to the puck? I tend to pass too quickly rather than try to stick handle. What would you suggest to work on this issue? Stickhandling? Thanks!

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04-05-2012, 09:21 PM
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topshelfie
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stick handling while standing still(no skating)

Do figure 8's around 2 pucks beside each other, around a foot or two apart, change the position of the pucks after a little while, this is good for beginning. You can also try stick handling in the opposite direction of the figure 8.

use 3 pucks in a triangle formation and stick handle around them, top of triangle, bottom right then left, then do the opposite, repeat

while skating with puck

sharp turns around face off dots or pylons
skate around face off circles with the puck
try skating forwards and backwards stickhandling and doing crossovers

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04-06-2012, 12:01 AM
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DontTazMeBro
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Don't be so jumpy on the puck when you get it on your blade, keep your head up and wait to make the right play. If you have to take a hit to make a good play or chip it out of the zone do it. Coaches like that, and do what the guy above me stated. Stand still and do figure 8's it will alllow you to have more control when your stickhandling while looking to make a good play. Just ALWAYS remember keep your HEAD up! This one of the most important thins to not just throwing the puck away, it allows you to visualize what you have in front of you.

Good luck!

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04-06-2012, 12:01 AM
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Don't be so jumpy on the puck when you get it on your blade, keep your head up and wait to make the right play. If you have to take a hit to make a good play or chip it out of the zone do it. Coaches like that, and do what the guy above me stated. Stand still and do figure 8's it will alllow you to have more control when your stickhandling while looking to make a good play. Just ALWAYS remember keep your HEAD up! This one of the most important things to not just throwing the puck away, it allows you to visualize what you have in front of you.

Good luck!

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04-06-2012, 12:02 AM
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DontTazMeBro
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Woah, sorry about that ^^ don't know what happened. I apologize.

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04-06-2012, 01:32 AM
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qmechanic
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I'm not great at making good decisions with the puck either, but what helped me is to try to constantly be aware of where everyone is. Ideally, you want to have a plan and have some ideas on what to do before you get the puck.

This is especially relevant when you skate back to pick up the puck or dig the puck off the boards. Try to sneak a look back as you skate. I found this really works.

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04-06-2012, 01:32 AM
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Splitbtw
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It took a lot of pickup and a switch to defense to realize how much time you have. Play pickup and dont be afraid to make a mistake. Go to another pickup and worry less. Quickly, you will learn the buffer zone you have between holding on too long and not making the pass.

Enjoy. It really is a fun process.

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04-06-2012, 02:09 AM
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Lonny Bohonos
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I cannot stress what was said in the first reply enough. Stickhandling.

I hav seen many a great skater suck at hockey because they couldn't stickhandle and I've seen many a not so good skater be a great player because of their hands.

Skating is important but once you have the base level to skate at your given level it's ou hands that makes the biggest difference as far as I'm concerned.

Stickhandling gives you confidence and be able to makes that initial move buys you time.

You can order items to help practice on dry land, which is another great thing about atickhandling you don't need ice time.

Get a heavy weight puck for building strength for stick handling.

Get a swedish stickhandling ball to build quick hands.

Get a skills pad to simulate ice. EZ Puck has a roll up pad that has holes drilled into it and "pylons" to practice you figure 8s etc as was mentioned.

Build yourself an obstacle course.

Trick is learn the feel so you can keep your head up as much as possible. That will help with buying yourself time and making decisions.

Hockeyshot.com has a bunch of items for stickhandling.


Last edited by Lonny Bohonos: 04-06-2012 at 02:19 AM.
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Old
04-06-2012, 04:52 AM
  #9
Wilch
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lonny Bohonos View Post
I cannot stress what was said in the first reply enough. Stickhandling.

I hav seen many a great skater suck at hockey because they couldn't stickhandle and I've seen many a not so good skater be a great player because of their hands.

Skating is important but once you have the base level to skate at your given level it's ou hands that makes the biggest difference as far as I'm concerned.

Stickhandling gives you confidence and be able to makes that initial move buys you time.

You can order items to help practice on dry land, which is another great thing about atickhandling you don't need ice time.

Get a heavy weight puck for building strength for stick handling.

Get a swedish stickhandling ball to build quick hands.

Get a skills pad to simulate ice. EZ Puck has a roll up pad that has holes drilled into it and "pylons" to practice you figure 8s etc as was mentioned.

Build yourself an obstacle course.

Trick is learn the feel so you can keep your head up as much as possible. That will help with buying yourself time and making decisions.

Hockeyshot.com has a bunch of items for stickhandling.
You could also make your own handling/shooting pad for under $15. There's a thread somewhere but I can't be bothered to dig it up. Basically, a 4'x2' hardboard panel and some silicone spray from Home Depot, Rona, or whatever your local DIY home hardware store is.

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04-06-2012, 05:30 AM
  #10
Lonny Bohonos
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Originally Posted by Wilch View Post
You could also make your own handling/shooting pad for under $15. There's a thread somewhere but I can't be bothered to dig it up. Basically, a 4'x2' hardboard panel and some silicone spray from Home Depot, Rona, or whatever your local DIY home hardware store is.
Yes you can use plastic or the smooth side of the thin partial board stuff. Probably even counter top material will work.

Sadly I don't have that option as I finding this stuff is difficult here in the middle east so cost aside it was more beneficial to get it shipped over.

I will say the EZ Puck Extreme Passing kit is great as for 200 bucks it comes with a 4' x 8' skills pad which is huge plus the pad is ore drilled to hold the EZ Puck "pylons" and it comes with 6 pylons.

And it comes with the rebounder which rebounds the puck back to you to practice passing and one timers.

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04-06-2012, 05:58 AM
  #11
Wilch
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Originally Posted by Lonny Bohonos View Post
Yes you can use plastic or the smooth side of the thin partial board stuff. Probably even counter top material will work.

Sadly I don't have that option as I finding this stuff is difficult here in the middle east so cost aside it was more beneficial to get it shipped over.

I will say the EZ Puck Extreme Passing kit is great as for 200 bucks it comes with a 4' x 8' skills pad which is huge plus the pad is ore drilled to hold the EZ Puck "pylons" and it comes with 6 pylons.

And it comes with the rebounder which rebounds the puck back to you to practice passing and one timers.
Again, for those living in Europe or North America, a puck rebounder can be made with a few pieces of wood, hot glue, a short bungee rope and some tools. Should cost no more than $20-30.

And I'm currently in Asia right now, so I know how you feel. These things are not very accessible, and even if they are, there's no room for them.

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04-06-2012, 07:49 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lonny Bohonos View Post
Yes you can use plastic or the smooth side of the thin partial board stuff. Probably even counter top material will work.

Sadly I don't have that option as I finding this stuff is difficult here in the middle east so cost aside it was more beneficial to get it shipped over.

I will say the EZ Puck Extreme Passing kit is great as for 200 bucks it comes with a 4' x 8' skills pad which is huge plus the pad is ore drilled to hold the EZ Puck "pylons" and it comes with 6 pylons.

And it comes with the rebounder which rebounds the puck back to you to practice passing and one timers.
we I was a Yewt many years ago before they made the shooting/stickhandling pads, we would put thumbtacks into a regular puck(5 a side works great). Not those plastic thumbtacks the metal ones that have like a dome for a head. pucks sllide pretty well on concrete and blacktop with them in.

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Old
04-06-2012, 09:31 AM
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The obvious answer is stickhandling to be more comfortable on the puck, but there are two times when I improve at being confident on the puck: drop in (pickup) where there is no pressure and a giveaway isn't going to hurt your team so you are free to try those stickhandling moves you have practiced AND playing against worse competition.. I coach some teams of friends so when they let me play with them I know I am going to have time and space I may not at my level of hockey.

Practice the handles to have the moves, practice the confidence to be able to use them.

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04-07-2012, 11:21 AM
  #14
Splitbtw
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wahsnairb View Post
The obvious answer is stickhandling to be more comfortable on the puck, but there are two times when I improve at being confident on the puck: drop in (pickup) where there is no pressure and a giveaway isn't going to hurt your team so you are free to try those stickhandling moves you have practiced AND playing against worse competition.. I coach some teams of friends so when they let me play with them I know I am going to have time and space I may not at my level of hockey.

Practice the handles to have the moves, practice the confidence to be able to use them.
I would also agree on the stickhandling part and and practicing in no pressure/no lose situations that pickup brings. Learn from mistakes (don't beat yourself up for ever puck loss because you will lose pucks) and build confidence and learn from success (why did it work that time).

Take that and also try to play against harder competition because it'll force you to process things much quicker. Then your confidence grows when you succeed against higher competition and time seems to increase against lower or comparable competition.

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04-07-2012, 12:33 PM
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On top of being a confident stick handler, keeping your head up at all times is the main thing. Not just with the puck, but BEFORE you get the puck too. If you always really have a good idea of where everyone is on the ice, you'll know exactly how much time and space you have. If you skate around with your head down, you're always gonna think a defender could strip you at any moment, even when there isn't one nearby.

Another thing is to really keep your legs moving, and to keep your strides long and powerful even when you have the puck. So many guys will slow down once they get the puck, and switch to a short, choppy stride. If you slow down whenever you get the puck then defenders are going to close on you FAST, and you'll have no choice but to pass. At slow speeds you aren't much of a threat to blow by anyone, so defenders can play you really aggressively. Concentrate on maintaining your speed with the puck, and keeping your strides long and powerful like they are without the puck, and defenders will be more on their heels, buying you time and space.

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04-07-2012, 02:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ponder View Post
On top of being a confident stick handler, keeping your head up at all times is the main thing. Not just with the puck, but BEFORE you get the puck too. If you always really have a good idea of where everyone is on the ice, you'll know exactly how much time and space you have. If you skate around with your head down, you're always gonna think a defender could strip you at any moment, even when there isn't one nearby.

Another thing is to really keep your legs moving, and to keep your strides long and powerful even when you have the puck. So many guys will slow down once they get the puck, and switch to a short, choppy stride. If you slow down whenever you get the puck then defenders are going to close on you FAST, and you'll have no choice but to pass. At slow speeds you aren't much of a threat to blow by anyone, so defenders can play you really aggressively. Concentrate on maintaining your speed with the puck, and keeping your strides long and powerful like they are without the puck, and defenders will be more on their heels, buying you time and space.
Building on that you should change your speeds up when your skating into people. You come in slow and when your 5 ft away from the Dman start sprinting and he'll have to turn. Or come down the boards sorta fast but not all out and suck the dman in, then slam on the brakes and you should have the whole slot to pick up a trailer. I love to get the puck on the goal line/hashmarks on the boards and stand still. I suck a guy in a toe drag around him or spin off and go hard to the net with a pass or shortside shot under the bar. Very hard to stop especially if you keep the puck to the outside.

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04-10-2012, 10:22 AM
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Jarick
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Worked on my skating and stickhandling a lot, which gave me the confidence to hold on to the puck a split second more, which increased my effectiveness on ice leaps and bounds.

Sometimes you just have to get stripped a few times. Start to learn what does and doesn't work. Pickup hockey and shinny are GREAT for this. No pressure if you screw up.

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04-10-2012, 11:59 AM
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I used to pass way too quickly. One year I didn't make the Midget A team, and was stuck on the worst team in B. That's when I got over my stickhandling woes, as some of my linemates were so awful I just couldn't stand passing it to them unless they had an open net.

Since then I've carried it a lot more often.

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04-10-2012, 12:17 PM
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My hands aren't the greatest, so I never really feel comfortable stickhandling through people. What helped me to hold onto the puck instead of passing it was learning to protect it with my body. Being able to position myself between the puck and opposing players buys me some time to assess the situation and figure out my options.

Quote:
Originally Posted by WithOutPaperss View Post
I used to pass way too quickly. One year I didn't make the Midget A team, and was stuck on the worst team in B. That's when I got over my stickhandling woes, as some of my linemates were so awful I just couldn't stand passing it to them unless they had an open net.

Since then I've carried it a lot more often.
Lol, I started carrying the puck more for this reason. I was always stuck on midget Bs after starting ice hockey at 15 and some of the kids I played with could barely make it up and down the ice without falling. Passing to them was just begging for them to get flattened.

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04-10-2012, 12:41 PM
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i am having a similar issue. when i get the puck, i can usually find my teammates, which is simply a better option than carrying it myself. however, my linemates do not pass well, and almost never pass to me. i am faster than them, and try to get open pretty much every second i am on the ice (i play center), but more often than not the wings either try a hero crossice pass between themselves, or if we are in the defensive zone, they simply try to dump/ice the puck.

i've added lots of stickhandling to my practice and working on entering the offensive zone by myself.

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04-10-2012, 01:53 PM
  #21
Jarick
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What works there is to skate east-west in your end with your stick open to the teammate on your forehand, kind of makes it glaringly obvious you are open.

Of course if you're on my team they then tap pass it right to an opposing player and never will try to pass to you again out of fear of turning it over.

I don't think a lot of guys on my team could actually send the puck all the way down the ice. I'm not sure they have the strength, considering how weak the passes are.

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04-10-2012, 03:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ponder View Post
On top of being a confident stick handler, keeping your head up at all times is the main thing. Not just with the puck, but BEFORE you get the puck too. If you always really have a good idea of where everyone is on the ice, you'll know exactly how much time and space you have. If you skate around with your head down, you're always gonna think a defender could strip you at any moment, even when there isn't one nearby.
That's what I came here to post. Look, look, look before you get the puck. If you know where everyone is, or at least where the other team isn't, you'll be much more comfortable holding onto the puck once it's on your stick because you will know, not think, know, that you have X amount of time to do something.

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04-10-2012, 04:26 PM
  #23
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Originally Posted by qmechanic View Post
I'm not great at making good decisions with the puck either, but what helped me is to try to constantly be aware of where everyone is.
To elaborate just a bit more on this, is try to be aware of where everyone is before you get the puck and where you think they're going to be when you do have it. It would also help to learn the generic idea of the positioning for each skater's position like the C, the LW, etc so you at least have an idea of what/where your options are going to be.

Also, to reiterate on what others have already said - develop your skating, puck protection and different stickhandling skills so you can buy time in case no one is open. And never underestimate the power of a curl around or tight turns! Become comfortable along the boards and phonebooth stickhandling where the puck is a lot closer to your feet as opposed to open ice stickhandling where it can be farther out.

Mistakes happen, just keep practicing.

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04-10-2012, 05:07 PM
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I don't think a lot of guys on my team could actually send the puck all the way down the ice. I'm not sure they have the strength, considering how weak the passes are.
A lot of it could be confidence. I can rifle a pass from my end to the opposing blue line, but if I do that a couple times and get picked off, my confidence fades and all of a sudden I start giving slow, wobbly safe passes. You should rally them to play a bit more aggressively when you already have the lead, to build up both ability and confidence!

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04-10-2012, 10:20 PM
  #25
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Nothing wrong with a slow, accurate pass, as long as it gets there in time for your teammate to do something with it.

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