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CBC's Ten Most Violent Hockey Incidents

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Old
04-02-2004, 09:40 AM
  #1
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CBC's Ten Most Violent Hockey Incidents

CBC Sports has in depth examination of violence in hockey at its website. In the wake of the Bertuzzi/Moore incident they have compiled their version of the Ten Best (Worst?) List of Hockey Lowlights. The page also includes a list of the longest suspensions in league history. The ten are:

In the wake of the Todd Bertuzzi's attack on Steve Moore, we've (CBC) compiled a list of 10 of the most noteworthy and memorable acts of hockey goonery, including:

1. Retaliatory hit begets All-Star Game (Shore/Bailey)
2. "Rocket" Richard's tomahawk & the ensuing riot (Richard/Laycoe)
3. Wayne Maki fractures Ted Green's skull
4. Bobby Clarke's Summit Series chop (Clarke and Ferguson vs. the godless commies)
5. Maloney crowns Glennie; crown sticks it to Maloney
6. The night the lights went out (1987 Canada/Russia World Juniors)
7. Hunter ends Turgeon's playoff run
8. Jeff Kugel runs wild in OHL game (Slapshot Part Deux)
9. Gary Suter ruins Paul Kariya's Olympics
10. The Marty McSorley trial

See:
http://www.cbc.ca/sports/columns/top...lowlights.html

The one that is not there is the February 1, 1959 fearsome beating that Gordie Howe laid on Rangers Leapin' Lou Fontinato, so-called because he left his feet when delivering body checks (some claim the "Leapin'" referred to his antics when called for a penalty when he would jump up and down while berating the referee). Howe had just decked Eddie (The Entertainer) Shack, then with the Rangers, with a thunderous check and was challenged by NYR enforcer Lou Fontinato. Big mistake on the part of Leapin' Louie.

I have read accounts of people who were at the game and of the game officials. The referee, linesmen and other players were in virtual shock as Howe demolished one of the most feared NHL heavyweights in short order. One of Howe's teammates noted in awe that it was so vicious any one nearby could hear "whomp, whomp, whomp" as Fontinato took punches to the face. Another witness described the sound like the beating of a drum.

Fontinato was unrecognizable from the beating he took and he was never the same player again. As as result Howe rarely had to fight again as players avoided dropping the gloves with him from then.

Here's picture of Laid Low Lou bandaged up and Gordie flexing:
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...ayphotohosting

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Old
04-02-2004, 09:47 AM
  #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wetcoaster
2. "Rocket" Richard's tomahawk & the ensuing riot (Richard/Laycoe)

Here's a good read for people who dont know much about the event...


page 1
http://www.letsgowings.com/history/moments/riot.html

page 2
http://www.letsgowings.com/history/moments/riot2.html

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Old
04-02-2004, 10:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wetcoaster
The one that is not there is the February 1, 1959 fearsome beating that Gordie Howe laid on Rangers Leapin' Lou Fontinato, so-called because he left his feet when delivering body checks (some claim the "Leapin'" referred to his antics when called for a penalty when he would jump up and down while berating the referee). Howe had just decked Eddie (The Entertainer) Shack, then with the Rangers, with a thunderous check and was challenged by NYR enforcer Lou Fontinato. Big mistake on the part of Leapin' Louie.

I have read accounts of people who were at the game and of the game officials. The referee, linesmen and other players were in virtual shock as Howe demolished one of the most feared NHL heavyweights in short order. One of Howe's teammates noted in awe that it was so vicious any one nearby could hear "whomp, whomp, whomp" as Fontinato took punches to the face. Another witness described the sound like the beating of a drum.

Fontinato was unrecognizable from the beating he took and he was never the same player again. As as result Howe rarely had to fight again as players avoided dropping the gloves with him from then.
Off topic, but I think that Gordie was the first power forward. Cam Neely is often mentioned as the first (for good reason), but Gordie also used his size and strength to intimidate players and knock people around to get goals. Of course, everything I know about Gordie is from reading and watching highlight footage, but he impresses me as epitomizing everything that goes into being a powerforward.

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Old
04-02-2004, 10:33 AM
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How does this fail to make the list, it would appear to be far worse than McSorley's stick swing?

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/fea...2/inside_look/

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Old
04-02-2004, 10:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MotownMadman
Off topic, but I think that Gordie was the first power forward. Cam Neely is often mentioned as the first (for good reason), but Gordie also used his size and strength to intimidate players and knock people around to get goals. Of course, everything I know about Gordie is from reading and watching highlight footage, but he impresses me as epitomizing everything that goes into being a powerforward.
I agree however you could make a similar case for Rocket Richard.

Gordie began his NHL career in 1946-47 while Richard started four years earlier.

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04-02-2004, 10:39 AM
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The fact that the Clarke slash is on there is laughable.

That play only happens a few times a week in the NHL.

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04-02-2004, 10:56 AM
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Originally Posted by John Flyers Fan
The fact that the Clarke slash is on there is laughable.

That play only happens a few times a week in the NHL.
They padding was almost non-existent then.

Clarke illegally and purposefully broke the guy's ankle to give Canada an edge. To me, that is against everything that is sport.

But I can't believe that Bertuzzi's punch isn't in there, and I don't think the Kariya thing should be in there.

Did they forget Dino Cicerelli's head chop? That makes the Mcsorely hit look like a love tap.

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04-02-2004, 11:03 AM
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I find it funny the Bertuzzi incident isn't on here after so many F'ing people made such a huge deal about it. He received the longest suspension and didn't even break the top 10 (not that that's a bad thing mind you)...just seems weird to me.

I do agree with the majority of the list though.

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04-02-2004, 11:05 AM
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Personally think Bertuzzi's deserves to be above McSorley's stick.

Oh well maybe on next year's list.

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04-02-2004, 11:06 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Impossibles
They padding was almost non-existent then.

Clarke illegally and purposefully broke the guy's ankle to give Canada an edge. To me, that is against everything that is sport.

But I can't believe that Bertuzzi's punch isn't in there, and I don't think the Kariya thing should be in there.

Did they forget Dino Cicerelli's head chop? That makes the Mcsorely hit look like a love tap.
#1. Every slash is technically illegal.
#2. Khalamov played in game 8.


This was the top 10 not counting Bertuzzi.

McSorely should be right at the top.

The Cicerelli chop as well as the Granato should be top 10 easily.

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Old
04-02-2004, 11:08 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Flyers Fan

This was the top 10 not counting Bertuzzi.
What exactly is the reasoning behind that?

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Old
04-02-2004, 11:09 AM
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Originally Posted by westcoast
What exactly is the reasoning behind that?
They were using Bertuzzi/Moore as the benchmark and then looked back historically from there at ten other incidents.

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04-02-2004, 12:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Impossibles
They padding was almost non-existent then.

Clarke illegally and purposefully broke the guy's ankle to give Canada an edge. To me, that is against everything that is sport.

But I can't believe that Bertuzzi's punch isn't in there, and I don't think the Kariya thing should be in there.

Did they forget Dino Cicerelli's head chop? That makes the Mcsorely hit look like a love tap.
And the Russian captain viciously kicked and badly bloodied a Canadian player as well. After writing a paper on the topic recently it boggles my mind how people try to paint Clarke out as the be all and end all villain of the series. I hate the way he played hockey, and I hate how he is as a horrible human being, but in this series, he was much like every other player.

The Summit Series was more intense than any other hockey game(s) ever played. Every player acted in an elevated way. Clarke slashed a guy, a Russian fought, Pacific Gilbert fought (his first hockey fight), their captain kicked our player (Bergman I believe), The Russians were constantly spearing the Canadians and slashing at the top of the gloves, people were swinging sticks at (albeit incompetant) refs, the Canadians were delivering elbows and charging....

It really amazes me how people keep pulling out the Clarke slash from all the violence in the series.

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Old
04-02-2004, 12:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MotownMadman
Off topic, but I think that Gordie was the first power forward. Cam Neely is often mentioned as the first (for good reason), but Gordie also used his size and strength to intimidate players and knock people around to get goals. Of course, everything I know about Gordie is from reading and watching highlight footage, but he impresses me as epitomizing everything that goes into being a powerforward.
What about Ted Lindsay, he was in his 3rd year during Howe's rookie season?

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Old
04-02-2004, 12:23 PM
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Originally Posted by Mountie
And the Russian captain viciously kicked and badly bloodied a Canadian player as well. After writing a paper on the topic recently it boggles my mind how people try to paint Clarke out as the be all and end all villain of the series. I hate the way he played hockey, and I hate how he is as a horrible human being, but in this series, he was much like every other player.

The Summit Series was more intense than any other hockey game(s) ever played. Every player acted in an elevated way. Clarke slashed a guy, a Russian fought, Pacific Gilbert fought (his first hockey fight), their captain kicked our player (Bergman I believe), The Russians were constantly spearing the Canadians and slashing at the top of the gloves, people were swinging sticks at (albeit incompetant) refs, the Canadians were delivering elbows and charging....

It really amazes me how people keep pulling out the Clarke slash from all the violence in the series.
Really? Very interesting. I'll admit I have never watched the games of the summit series, and have based my opinions on heresay. Your post makes me want to rent the DVD set.

Do you still have the paper you wrote on your computer? I'd love to read it. PM me if you still have it and I'll get you to email it to me.

Back on topic, the idea of another player intentionally trying to injure another player outside the rules (as opposed to bending the rules or trying to hurt someone) to gain an advantage really disgusts me. I know it happens all the time, but to me it is against the entire point of sport. It's a shame winning means so much that it is even more important than the game itself.

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04-02-2004, 12:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Impossibles
Really? Very interesting. I'll admit I have never watched the games of the summit series, and have based my opinions on heresay. Your post makes me want to rent the DVD set.

Do you still have the paper you wrote on your computer? I'd love to read it. PM me if you still have it and I'll get you to email it to me.

Back on topic, the idea of another player intentionally trying to injure another player outside the rules (as opposed to bending the rules or trying to hurt someone) to gain an advantage really disgusts me. I know it happens all the time, but to me it is against the entire point of sport. It's a shame winning means so much that it is even more important than the game itself.
I recommend you pick up the Boxed set they have on DVD.

I would assume that 95% of those people that bring up the Clarke slahs have never watched the series.

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Old
04-02-2004, 12:38 PM
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I don't think the Suter hit was worse than the McSorely hit, or the Johnson sucker punch.

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04-02-2004, 12:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mountie
And the Russian captain viciously kicked and badly bloodied a Canadian player as well. After writing a paper on the topic recently it boggles my mind how people try to paint Clarke out as the be all and end all villain of the series. I hate the way he played hockey, and I hate how he is as a horrible human being, but in this series, he was much like every other player.

The Summit Series was more intense than any other hockey game(s) ever played. Every player acted in an elevated way. Clarke slashed a guy, a Russian fought, Pacific Gilbert fought (his first hockey fight), their captain kicked our player (Bergman I believe), The Russians were constantly spearing the Canadians and slashing at the top of the gloves, people were swinging sticks at (albeit incompetant) refs, the Canadians were delivering elbows and charging....

It really amazes me how people keep pulling out the Clarke slash from all the violence in the series.
One reason why people keep bringing it up is to make fun of Clarke's hypocricy like when he was whining in 1998 about how Gary Suter's NHL suspension should carry over to the Olympics and so on. Since becoming a GM Clarke has tried repeatedly to paint himself as an advocate for honorable hockey which is laughable.

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04-02-2004, 01:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wetcoaster
6. The night the lights went out (1987 Canada/Russia World Juniors)
Anyone see the (I think) Brian Williams/Don Cherry interview after that. I thought Don was going to kicked the snot out of him.

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04-02-2004, 02:17 PM
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Originally Posted by Epsilon
One reason why people keep bringing it up is to make fun of Clarke's hypocricy like when he was whining in 1998 about how Gary Suter's NHL suspension should carry over to the Olympics and so on. Since becoming a GM Clarke has tried repeatedly to paint himself as an advocate for honorable hockey which is laughable.
That's fair enough Epsilon, and I agree that it does make sense to make fun of Clarke for his hypocrisy. Like I said, I don't like the guy at all, I just think that the rest of the Summit Series has to be taken into account before people identify it as the "low point in Canadian" hockey are anything like that. THe entire series was a big mess, and full of a lot of dirty play. Sure the slash caused injury, though Kharlamov wasn't so badly hurt that he couldn't play, but I mean, if given the choice between getting slashed with a hockey stick or kicked by a skate, I'd take being slashed a million times over I think.

I'm not trying to defend Clarke's slash or anything like that, just think its fair to put context into the incident.

BUt yeah, end of story, Clarke is both a bully and hypocrite.

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04-02-2004, 02:33 PM
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Originally Posted by Mountie

But yeah, end of story, Clarke is both a bully and hypocrite.
That's fine, but just be sure to include the fact that he was one of Canada's best forwards during the tournament, and one of the 25-30 best players in the history of the game.

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04-02-2004, 02:37 PM
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Originally Posted by John Flyers Fan
That's fine, but just be sure to include the fact that he was one of Canada's best forwards during the tournament, and one of the 25-30 best players in the history of the game.
I definitely agree that he was one of the teams best players during the tournament. Absolutely I agree with that. Clarke was a fiercesome forechecker who also managed to contribute frequently to teh scoresheet, and there is no doubt that his antics helped shake the Soviet poise, as they had never really come against a player like him before.

I'm not certain I would put him in the top 25-30 forwards to ever play the game though. That seems extremely generous to me, although I admit I have never sat down and thought who I consider the top 25 players of all time.

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04-02-2004, 03:02 PM
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Originally Posted by Mountie
I'm not certain I would put him in the top 25-30 forwards to ever play the game though. That seems extremely generous to me, although I admit I have never sat down and thought who I consider the top 25 players of all time.
When The Hockey News did it's hisotical rankings in 1998 they had him listed as the 23rd best player to play in the NHL.

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04-02-2004, 11:19 PM
  #24
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Originally Posted by GB
What about Ted Lindsay, he was in his 3rd year during Howe's rookie season?
At 5'8'' and 160 lbs. he does not really fit the definition of a power forward. However pound for pound I doubt there has ever been anyone as tough who combined the offensive gifts Terrible Ted exhibited.

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04-02-2004, 11:25 PM
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Originally Posted by Mountie
I definitely agree that he was one of the teams best players during the tournament. Absolutely I agree with that. Clarke was a fiercesome forechecker who also managed to contribute frequently to teh scoresheet, and there is no doubt that his antics helped shake the Soviet poise, as they had never really come against a player like him before.

I'm not certain I would put him in the top 25-30 forwards to ever play the game though. That seems extremely generous to me, although I admit I have never sat down and thought who I consider the top 25 players of all time.

As someone else noted the 1998 Hockey News 100 best listed him at #23. The first 50 on the list can be found at:
http://www.chidlovski.com/personal/1...ts/nhlt100.htm

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