HFBoards

Go Back   HFBoards > General Hockey Discussion > The Rink
Mobile Hockey's Future Become a Sponsor Site Rules Support Forum vBookie Page 2
The Rink For the not so ready for prime-time players, coaches, referees, and the people that have to live with them. Discuss experiences in local leagues, coaching tips, equipment, and training.

Backhand

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old
10-21-2009, 01:32 PM
  #1
Ani simov mal
Registered User
 
Ani simov mal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: New York
Country: United States
Posts: 488
vCash: 500
Backhand

As much as I practice I can't pick it up, and I even have a malkin curve . What am I doing wrong?

Ani simov mal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
10-21-2009, 01:46 PM
  #2
Saved*
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Canada
Country: Canada
Posts: 2,830
vCash: 500
It's all on the follow through.

Saved* is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
10-21-2009, 02:17 PM
  #3
BadHammy*
MSL For Hart!
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Right Behind Me!
Posts: 10,444
vCash: 500
Do a reverse wrist shot, closed blade at first, then open, then close it at the end. If you are in very close though, open that face up all the way and go shelf.

BadHammy* is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
10-21-2009, 02:38 PM
  #4
cptjeff
[insert joke here]
 
cptjeff's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Washington, DC.
Country: United States
Posts: 8,459
vCash: 501
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anisimov View Post
As much as I practice I can't pick it up, and I even have a malkin curve . What am I doing wrong?
The name on the curve means nothing. It's for marketing.

It just takes a lot of practice with the correct technique. And without seeing your shot we can't tell you what you're doing wrong.

cptjeff is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
10-21-2009, 02:43 PM
  #5
Ani simov mal
Registered User
 
Ani simov mal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: New York
Country: United States
Posts: 488
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by cptjeff View Post
The name on the curve means nothing. It's for marketing.

It just takes a lot of practice with the correct technique. And without seeing your shot we can't tell you what you're doing wrong.

I'm just saying, because the malkin curve is mid heel and is pretty flat on the backhand side.

Ani simov mal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
10-21-2009, 02:46 PM
  #6
noobman
Registered User
 
noobman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Country: Canada
Posts: 4,636
vCash: 500
I'd have to see what you were doing to give you any advice.

noobman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
10-21-2009, 02:53 PM
  #7
Ani simov mal
Registered User
 
Ani simov mal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: New York
Country: United States
Posts: 488
vCash: 500
I basically do a wrist shot on my backhand side. I start from the heel, go up to the toe while I begin to open it, and then release it with a follow through. The puck weakly slides across the ice or wherever I’m practicing. I don't have any videos of my self.

Ani simov mal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
10-21-2009, 02:55 PM
  #8
CanadaBacon
 
CanadaBacon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Hamilton
Country: Canada
Posts: 3,570
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anisimov View Post
I'm just saying, because the malkin curve is mid heel and is pretty flat on the backhand side.

I think it has more to do with the 3/8" curve then it being a heel

CanadaBacon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
10-21-2009, 02:56 PM
  #9
Superstar Treatment
Registered User
 
Superstar Treatment's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: 732 Jersey
Country: United States
Posts: 1,645
vCash: 500
Send a message via AIM to Superstar Treatment
You might be letting go too late, if it's already at the toe, especially on a blade like that, you're going to pretty much have no real power to it. You want to start at the heel and get rid of it around the center of the blade.

Superstar Treatment is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
10-21-2009, 02:57 PM
  #10
rinkrat22
Registered User
 
rinkrat22's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Chicago
Country: United States
Posts: 575
vCash: 500
getting your momentum going in the direction of travel is so important to the backhand. you will never get a good backhander if you body doesn't follow the shot. you will see guys on here debate which foot to shot off of, and other mechanics on the forehand shots.(wrist, snap, slap) but you must " follow your shot" on a backhander.

rinkrat22 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
10-21-2009, 02:59 PM
  #11
CanadaBacon
 
CanadaBacon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Hamilton
Country: Canada
Posts: 3,570
vCash: 500
I use a 3/4" mid and i have to really get under the puck to lift it. I have no problem with backhands now, but i struggled for a long time in junior.

getting under it and the follow through is what helped me.

CanadaBacon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
10-21-2009, 04:10 PM
  #12
BadHammy*
MSL For Hart!
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Right Behind Me!
Posts: 10,444
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Superstar Treatment View Post
You might be letting go too late, if it's already at the toe, especially on a blade like that, you're going to pretty much have no real power to it. You want to start at the heel and get rid of it around the center of the blade.
Good advice.

BadHammy* is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
10-21-2009, 07:48 PM
  #13
Hockeyfan68
Registered User
 
Hockeyfan68's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Lewiston, ME USA
Country: United States
Posts: 2,418
vCash: 500
The others here have covered it well with the get under it and followthrough business.

I start mine mid blade and by the time I followthrough it lifts up nicely with the toe. It depends on what you are shooting at too ... what kind of shot you are making.

if you are in tight and shooting upward to get under the crossbar it is wrist action and with a followthrough but if you are a little ways out from the goal and want mustard on it with a good hard backhander you would need to start it around the heel and use your wrists and a good strong sweeping followthrough.

I really really worked on mine because it sucked honestly for quite a spell. It took about 3 years before I got a really good one. There are different ways to shoot one so practicing it with a basic one like the guys here described would be best. Once you figure that out try other things a little more fancy.

I make really good strong backhand passes rink wide on the off-wing which is another backhander obviously.

Flick of the wrist with followthrough I guess I would say it is. Curl the wrist downward in the followthrough and it (the puck) will stay on the ice and flip your wrists with an upward curl in the followthrough and it elevates.

Then you have saucer passing on the backhand wihcih is a nice touch when you get the other backhanders learned. I got an assist on a nice saucer backhand the last game we played .... one of those passes that got comments from the other team which made me happy and also made me feel good about how much time I put into shooting backhanders.

As a side note I learned mine by seeing how good Bobby Smith's backhand was. he played for Montreal and Minnesota (Northstars).


Last edited by Hockeyfan68: 10-21-2009 at 07:55 PM.
Hockeyfan68 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
10-21-2009, 09:13 PM
  #14
adaminnj
Leafs out = SPRING!
 
adaminnj's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Pickering ON & N-NJ
Country: Canada
Posts: 667
vCash: 50
It took me about a year to get a decent back hand. It took loads of practice skating backwards down the boards with the puck on my backhand and shoot, shoot, shoot until my shoulders ached for the next two days and working on nothing other than my back hand during that days stick and puck.

The big trick I learned once I got a bit of power behind my backhand was to handle the puck on the backhand just the same as you would on the forehand (You know cup the puck with the blade of the stick and roll it up the blade to get lift.) by no means am I saying I'm a good shot but I know understand the mechanics of the back hand (now I need to get the muscle memory so I do it the same way every time)

adaminnj is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
10-22-2009, 02:15 AM
  #15
Degenerate191
Registered User
 
Degenerate191's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Portland, OR
Country: United States
Posts: 1,652
vCash: 500
When I very first started trying them my buddy told me to invision yourself shoveling, and throwing the dirt behind you. It's not very technical, but it helped me start to get some lift under the puck.

Degenerate191 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
10-22-2009, 02:42 AM
  #16
BadHammy*
MSL For Hart!
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Right Behind Me!
Posts: 10,444
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Degenerate191 View Post
When I very first started trying them my buddy told me to invision yourself shoveling, and throwing the dirt behind you. It's not very technical, but it helped me start to get some lift under the puck.
Good analogy.

BadHammy* is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
10-22-2009, 06:42 PM
  #17
fearitself
 
fearitself's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: North Vancouver
Country: Canada
Posts: 33
vCash: 500
Try this..

line up perpendicular to the net and put the puck in line with your front foot. Put the puck way back on the heel of your blade and open it up to just over 90 degrees. Scoop with your arms.

the flattest part of your blade is between the heel and the apex of the curve. This area must be well utilized when doing backhands. My backhand is money

fearitself is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
10-23-2009, 01:13 PM
  #18
Jarick
Moderator
Doing Nothing
 
Jarick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: St Paul, MN
Country: United States
Posts: 23,605
vCash: 500
For me it's all about cupping the puck, start at the heel, keep the bottom hand lower, then drive my weight and the puck across the body then release towards the net like a wrist shot.

Jarick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
10-23-2009, 03:14 PM
  #19
BadHammy*
MSL For Hart!
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Right Behind Me!
Posts: 10,444
vCash: 500
Cupping helps. The real difficulty in the backhand is doing it at full speed from a hard angle with 2 defenseman on your back.

BadHammy* is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
10-23-2009, 04:37 PM
  #20
noobman
Registered User
 
noobman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Country: Canada
Posts: 4,636
vCash: 500
Getting lift on your backhand is, IMO, easier than getting velocity on it.

The wrist flick at the end and the subsequent follow through will determine how high your backhander goes.

Find an instructional video for the backhander and practice it. That's the only way you'll learn!

noobman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
10-23-2009, 06:18 PM
  #21
BadHammy*
MSL For Hart!
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Right Behind Me!
Posts: 10,444
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by noobman View Post
Getting lift on your backhand is, IMO, easier than getting velocity on it.

The wrist flick at the end and the subsequent follow through will determine how high your backhander goes.

Find an instructional video for the backhander and practice it. That's the only way you'll learn!
I dono about that. IMO, if you have a strong wrister, you should have a strong backhand too.

BadHammy* is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-29-2012, 06:22 PM
  #22
do0glas
Registered User
 
do0glas's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 6,015
vCash: 500
just bumping this, instead of making a new thread.

So, ive moved on with my snap and wrist shots that i feel good enough about them and i can focus on my backhand. without skates, i can shelf it. with skates its getting about halfway up the net (roller) and ill be attemping on ice tomorrow. ive found that having the blade flat and utilizing the weight transfer seems to help a lot, for those trying to learn.

the shot seems very technique heavy, and i cant even think of a situation outside the dots that i would even try this. for those that have been playing awhile, do you find yourself using this shot a lot?

do0glas is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
07-03-2012, 12:02 AM
  #23
Fanned On It
Registered User
 
Fanned On It's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: New York
Country: United States
Posts: 1,845
vCash: 500
I'm just getting good at "roofing" my backhand in close... for me it's all about the flick of the wrist, and I sort of put a tiny bit of space between my blade and the puck and kind of "snap-shot" it but with my back-hand. That's probably a crappy way to describe it because it's not like a huge amount of space, but I find a little space (like an inch) help with getting the puck to go vertical.

Fanned On It is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
07-03-2012, 12:58 AM
  #24
1Knee1T
OHH MAMMA DONT U CRY
 
1Knee1T's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Country: United States
Posts: 3,184
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by do0glas View Post
just bumping this, instead of making a new thread.

So, ive moved on with my snap and wrist shots that i feel good enough about them and i can focus on my backhand. without skates, i can shelf it. with skates its getting about halfway up the net (roller) and ill be attemping on ice tomorrow. ive found that having the blade flat and utilizing the weight transfer seems to help a lot, for those trying to learn.

the shot seems very technique heavy, and i cant even think of a situation outside the dots that i would even try this. for those that have been playing awhile, do you find yourself using this shot a lot?
Probably more for backhand saucer passes and clears out of my own end than for shooting. I do use the backhand a lot when I'm battling in front of the net though.

1Knee1T is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
07-03-2012, 02:40 AM
  #25
Wilch
Unregistered User
 
Wilch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Under your bed
Country: Taiwan
Posts: 8,124
vCash: 500
You have to feel the puck rolling off the back of your blades. Once you get that, you can start "whipping" the puck for added velocity.

Wilch is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Forum Jump


Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:48 AM.

monitoring_string = "e4251c93e2ba248d29da988d93bf5144"
Contact Us - HFBoards - Archive - Privacy Statement - Terms of Use - Advertise - Top - AdChoices

vBulletin Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
HFBoards.com is a property of CraveOnline Media, LLC, an Evolve Media, LLC company. 2014 All Rights Reserved.