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Meta-analysis: Grit is perhaps not anything special

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05-26-2016, 10:25 PM
  #1
Xelebes
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Meta-analysis: Grit is perhaps not anything special

This isn't a hockey paper or anything. It is strictly psychology that has applications in sports psychology, which may be of interest to hockey coaches and hockey players. I bring this up here because I hear the term "grit" being used a lot here and a lot of people asserting that it indeed exists as a quality and is special. I have never been certain as to whether or not it existed but until recently, I didn't know that there was well-involved research into the matter and that the research was of especial interest to important people. So here we are.

Since "grit" is something relative new to me as opposed to some others who have already used the research into it, I will phrase things a bit aggressively but as a novice on the matter. But no matter what I may come across as, a question we have to ask ourselves, especially when it comes to the matter of educating students, coaching proteges, or developing leadership in business schools, is whether or not "grit" is in fact old wine in a new bottle. This latest meta-analysis of the research into the matter suggests that it is.

http://www.npr.org/sections/ed/2016/...itique-of-grit

Quote:
Grit has been on NPR several times recently, not to mention front and center on the national education agenda.

The term expresses the idea that a crucial component of success is people's ability to pick a goal and stick with it. That's the main thrust of research by Angela Duckworth at the University of Pennsylvania, which has earned her a MacArthur "genius" grant, national acclaim and, this month, a best-selling book.

. . .

Here are the key claims in Crede's paper:

* Effect sizes in one of Duckworth's major papers on grit were described incorrectly to sound misleadingly large.

* The impact of grit is exaggerated, especially when looking at broader populations of people not just the high achievers in Duckworth's initial studies.

* Grit is nearly identical to conscientiousness, which has been known to psychologists for decades as a major dimension of personality. It is not something that's necessarily open to change, especially in adults, whereas Duckworth in her writings suggests that grit is.

. . .
Link to the paper:

https://www.academia.edu/25397556/Mu...rit_Literature


Which just goes to show that personality psychology has a lot to do combat the internal pressure to construct itself into a self-licking ice-cream cone.

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05-27-2016, 12:41 PM
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Moops
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Originally Posted by Xelebes View Post
Which just goes to show that personality psychology has a lot to do combat the internal pressure to construct itself into a self-licking ice-cream cone.


Looks like an interesting read, I'll have to give it a gander.

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05-27-2016, 04:40 PM
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Ralph Spoilsport
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The term expresses the idea that a crucial component of success is people's ability to pick a goal and stick with it.

Grit your teeth. Kiss my grits. Just what is "true grit" anyway? The word has several meanings.

I think hockey people equate "grit" more with "abrasiveness" than "determination". A gritty player is one who doesn't mind rough going, likes to get in the face and under the skin of opponents, makes playing against them uncomfortable and unpleasant, will wear them down.

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05-27-2016, 09:51 PM
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Kyle McMahon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ralph Spoilsport View Post
Grit your teeth. Kiss my grits. Just what is "true grit" anyway? The word has several meanings.

I think hockey people equate "grit" more with "abrasiveness" than "determination". A gritty player is one who doesn't mind rough going, likes to get in the face and under the skin of opponents, makes playing against them uncomfortable and unpleasant, will wear them down.
Definitely. Grit in a hockey sense is observable but seemingly not measurable. A guy who will take a hit to make a play, outwork somebody for a loose puck, battle for inches in front of the net, etc. I'm not sure how you could assign a statistical measure to those qualities.

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05-28-2016, 01:42 AM
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Oneiro
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Grit as psychologists refer to it (implied in the original post) is something different than what know of "grit" in hockey. It is one way of characterizing people who see mistakes as stepping stones to getting better at what they do, as opposed to seeing failure as the result of an intrinsic, permanent flaw in who they are.

Grit in hockey is playing a tough, physical game. Hard on the puck, totally willing to go into the corners and shovel to win the battle, finishing checks. You can point to specific actions as much as an attitude.

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05-30-2016, 12:00 AM
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Xelebes
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I do see a connection between "hockey grit" and "psychogical grit". And they are on the "grit-flake" dichotomy which are stereotypes we have for strong players who use their size and strength to keep themselves on or after the puck and you have the not-so big or not-so-strong players who have to play out in the open and play passively. In psychology, grit is being called out as conscientiousness and in hockey, I guess it could be called out as strength.

As I see it, a small and weak player who takes the hits and goes into the corner isn't going to be called gritty because he is going to be out-muscled most of the time and is going to frustrate the coach and the audience more than earn their praise.

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05-30-2016, 01:52 PM
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tfong
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I always thought the reference of grit came from sandpaper reference for hockey players?

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