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Switching from open-faced to closed-face curve (PP96 Bouchard)

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08-04-2012, 02:48 PM
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MrData
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Switching from open-faced to closed-face curve (PP96 Bouchard)

Hi everyone,

I'm going to buy a Sher-Wood T90 soon, and I'd like to change my curve. I currently use a Nexon 6, 90 flex, PP09 Ryan curve, and I also have an 11k, 85 flex, with a PP20 Drury Sher-Wood replacement blade (I guess the Reebok equivalent is the P36 Phaneuf). I'm 19 years old, 5'9/170 lbs, and I play defense in an adult league once a week.

I'm considering getting the T90 with a PP96 Bouchard curve. The main reason I want to change curves is that my wrist shots go a little high with the Ryan and especially the Drury. I like them both because they give my slapshots a nice zip and some good elevation, but as a defensive/two-way defenseman whose offensive output comes mainly from the blue line, I'd like my slapshots and blue-line wristers to naturally go a little lower to produce rebounds and deflections. I'm just afraid that switching to the PP96, which has a closed face, will take away some of the zip from my slapshots. Does anyone have experience with this particular curve, or experience with switching from an open-face curve to a closed face?

Thanks for reading, and I'd appreciate any insight you can provide.

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08-04-2012, 03:02 PM
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opivy
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I've found the opposite actually, I get a good raised shot with the open faces, but they're more prone to flutter without good form. The closed face ones seem to always come off as rockets but you have to work to get them up. They will always follow your follow through.

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08-04-2012, 03:14 PM
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MrData
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Quote:
Originally Posted by opivy View Post
I've found the opposite actually, I get a good raised shot with the open faces, but they're more prone to flutter without good form. The closed face ones seem to always come off as rockets but you have to work to get them up. They will always follow your follow through.
That's good to know. I want to be able to keep my slapshot about a foot above the ice from the blueline and get some good velocity on it. I also sometimes throw the puck on net with a wristshot and it would be good to be able to keep it low, yet not fluttery. My wrist shots will sometimes flutter with my Drury and Ryan sticks, but my slap shots almost always come off stable.

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08-04-2012, 06:50 PM
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Originally Posted by MrData View Post
That's good to know. I want to be able to keep my slapshot about a foot above the ice from the blueline and get some good velocity on it. I also sometimes throw the puck on net with a wristshot and it would be good to be able to keep it low, yet not fluttery. My wrist shots will sometimes flutter with my Drury and Ryan sticks, but my slap shots almost always come off stable.
Yeah closed face blades usually go exactly where you point with both wrist shots and slappers, so you'll definitely have more control if you want to keep your shots low. I would have to say that the flutter seems to be less with closed faces as well, although if you have really good technique (I don't) then I'm sure you can keep the puck from fluttering every time no matter what curve you're using.

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08-06-2012, 07:08 AM
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Jarick
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Yes I have found closed face curves take a considerable amount of zip off my shots so I adjust my follow through and technique and use open curves.

But for closed curves, you REALLY want to make sure the lie is accurate, because if the lie is too high, you're likely going to be robbed of even more power as the puck will skid on the ice instead of sticking to the blade.

If the lie is good (and usually the PM9 clones will have a lower lie), you should be fine, and keep the shots lower.

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