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Mars rover landing on Sunday

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09-01-2012, 12:13 PM
  #276
Diatidialga
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Quote:
Originally Posted by No Fun Shogun View Post
He was listing just various terraforming ideas, but none of which address what I brought up. Without a magnetosphere, solar radiation would still pour in and whatever atmosphere we create would permanently require constant upkeep to keep intact.
And then again, we also would need cargo ships with the ability to transport large amounts of plant life and equipment, which is way beyond our technology at the moment.

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09-01-2012, 12:21 PM
  #277
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Quote:
Originally Posted by No Fun Shogun View Post
He was listing just various terraforming ideas, but none of which address what I brought up. Without a magnetosphere, solar radiation would still pour in and whatever atmosphere we create would permanently require constant upkeep to keep intact.
"Upkeep" makes it sound like people have to fly up there.

We're talking 100 years into the future here. Technology is advancing exponentially.


The lack of a magnetosphere is not a huge problem for the BEGINNING OF TERRAFORMING. Most solar radiation is handled by the atmosphere, not the magnetosphere.

1000 years is way too conservative an estimate, IMO.

What is your formal education in physics? (curious)




edit: sorry, didn't make it obvious that I meant we BEGIN the terraforming in 100 years. of course, mars won't be FULLY terraformed in 100 years.


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09-02-2012, 01:18 AM
  #278
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Terraforming on a smaller scale so we can all relate


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09-02-2012, 11:08 AM
  #279
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Originally Posted by Diatidialga View Post
And then again, we also would need cargo ships with the ability to transport large amounts of plant life and equipment, which is way beyond our technology at the moment.
Not really.

See random engineer designing an actual starship-enterprise:

http://www.buildtheenterprise.org/

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The Gen1 Enterprise can arrive at Mars within 90 days of leaving earth’s orbit. This is derived from various analyses sponsored by NASA that show that with mass to engine power ratios within our reach, a 90 day travel time is possible.
Right now the main issue is cost, time and the primary propulsion systems proposed haven't been flushed out.

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09-02-2012, 02:52 PM
  #280
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NASA's Curiosity rover made its fourth trek on Aug. 30, a short 70-foot drive on its way to a destination on Mars where it will conduct science experiments using its drill and other instruments.

Curiosity landed on Mars on Aug. 5 (Pacific time), and the six-wheeled vehicle was made ready to roll after NASA engineers upgraded its on-board flight software with a new version, release 10, that's optimized for traveling long distances and making use of Curiosity's robotic arm. Curiosity's R9 software, the ninth full upgrade since the program's inception, was oriented to flight and landing control.

"While on cruise to Mars, we updated the software in June, and we updated the surface software right when it landed," said Benjamin Clichy, chief software engineer for the Curiosity rover at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California.

Written on Linux-based workstations, Curiosity' software runs on Wind River's VxWorks real-time operating system. The primary development environment is the Wind River Workbench. Software upgrades are beamed up to the rover through a series of signals sent from giant antennas in California, Spain, and Australia to orbiters circling Mars and then to the vehicle itself.

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09-03-2012, 10:17 AM
  #281
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http://twitter.com/FedTechMagazine/s...41892083392514
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NASA's #Curiosity uploads data at 256 kilobits per sec. That's 2 minutes in #Instagram time. [Infographic] ******/dnmcQ

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09-03-2012, 10:32 AM
  #282
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The fact that they used two ****ty songs to highlight how long it takes for the Curiosity to download stuff makes me think we should focus on trying to find intelligent life on earth before looking on Mars....

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09-03-2012, 10:36 AM
  #283
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1, you mean.

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09-06-2012, 10:54 PM
  #284
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[QUOTE]A fresh look at NASA data suggests that a robotic mission uncovered microbial life on Mars—more than 30 years ago.

In 1976 NASA sent two space probes, Vikings 1 and 2, to Mars to determine whether life exists on the red planet. The probes carried three experiments specially designed for the task, one of which was called the Labeled Release (LR) apparatus.

The LR experiment worked by scooping up a bit of Martian soil and mixing it with a drop of water that contained nutrients and radioactive carbon atoms.


http://news.nationalgeographic.com/n...space-science/


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09-07-2012, 12:10 AM
  #285
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This is definitely cool.

That said, I'm not super interested in microbial life on Mars. I think it's a tiny bit like the whole Higgs dealio - I kinda expect it already.


But nice find

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09-27-2012, 06:14 PM
  #286
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http://news.yahoo.com/mars-rover-cur...190805936.html

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Evidence of an ancient stream came from analyzing the size and shapes of pebbles and gravel near Gale Crater.

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09-27-2012, 07:48 PM
  #287
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Originally Posted by ixcuincle View Post
idk why but whenever i try to read yahoo news or w/e, i just end up reading comments below and not read the story b.c some of them r hilarous

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09-27-2012, 10:03 PM
  #288
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FLUVIAL DEPOSITS! FLUVIAL DEPOSITS FOR EVERYONE!


tis exciting

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10-14-2012, 07:50 AM
  #289
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As it rolls along the surface of Mars, NASA's Curiosity rover has begun putting its Swiss Army knife of scientific instruments to work. The six-wheeled vehicle is using nearly a dozen high-tech instruments to touch, scoop, sift, clean, and analyze rocks and dirt on its mission.

NASA recently said Curiosity had found "surprises" in the chemical makeup of a rock--dubbed Jake Matijevic by NASA scientists--that it probed. The rock's chemical composition resembled that of igneous rocks from the Earth's interior.

The high-flying lab has been exploring and snapping pictures of the Gale Crater since landing on the Red Planet on Aug. 6. It's also checking in on Foursquare, making it easier for observers to track its progress.

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10-14-2012, 10:49 AM
  #290
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One place I wish they'd drill to look for life is Saturn's moon, Titan

Lots of strange discoveries sure to be made there

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10-14-2012, 10:55 AM
  #291
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Originally Posted by ixcuincle View Post
Its such a high-flying lab with all 6 wheels firmly planted on the surface

I would do all sorts of things to operate the ChemCam for an hour.

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10-14-2012, 12:55 PM
  #292
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Its such a high-flying lab with all 6 wheels firmly planted on the surface

I would do all sorts of things to operate the ChemCam for an hour.
You can rent and buy similar devices, ASD spectrometers are probably the most similar, XRF devices are better. Neither use lasers though, you actually have to be near what you're testing. But they're still pretty amazing.

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10-14-2012, 01:33 PM
  #293
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Originally Posted by Masao View Post
One place I wish they'd drill to look for life is Saturn's moon, Titan

Lots of strange discoveries sure to be made there
The tech and our understanding of space aren't there yet. Mars is a vital step to get to Titan.

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10-14-2012, 01:36 PM
  #294
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Originally Posted by Masao View Post
One place I wish they'd drill to look for life is Saturn's moon, Titan

Lots of strange discoveries sure to be made there
Remotely controlling a probe gets really difficult when what you're seeing on your readouts is at least one hour old, and all the adjustments you try to make based on what you see on the screen won't happen for another hour. Which won't be seen on the screen for another two hours.

Imagine playing a video game when your latency is 3,600,000-7,200,000 ms



AI isn't really good enough to do everything on a surface mission like that either.




[1h is based on Saturn's closest distance to earth, which is probably when they would try such a mission]

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10-14-2012, 04:26 PM
  #295
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Remotely controlling a probe gets really difficult when what you're seeing on your readouts is at least one hour old, and all the adjustments you try to make based on what you see on the screen won't happen for another hour. Which won't be seen on the screen for another two hours.

Imagine playing a video game when your latency is 3,600,000-7,200,000 ms



AI isn't really good enough to do everything on a surface mission like that either.




[1h is based on Saturn's closest distance to earth, which is probably when they would try such a mission]
I guess they just have to be patient then? I mean Saturn takes 30 earth years to go around the sun, so I assume there's really very few times when it's even feasible to send something there. It's the kind of thing where you miss you chance once and you might never have another one in your lifetime

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10-14-2012, 04:38 PM
  #296
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Originally Posted by Masao View Post
I guess they just have to be patient then? I mean Saturn takes 30 earth years to go around the sun, so I assume there's really very few times when it's even feasible to send something there. It's the kind of thing where you miss you chance once and you might never have another one in your lifetime
What I'm saying is that a lander mission to Titan is dependent on AI tech progression. Because of the distance problem.

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10-14-2012, 10:39 PM
  #297
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Masao View Post
I guess they just have to be patient then? I mean Saturn takes 30 earth years to go around the sun, so I assume there's really very few times when it's even feasible to send something there. It's the kind of thing where you miss you chance once and you might never have another one in your lifetime
Unless Saturn has some sort of whacky orbit it shouldn't matter how long it takes to go around, you just have to get the calendar day on earth to match up.

The tricky part from the other probes that just left the solar system is doing it when the planets are aligned properly so a single probe can hit multiple planets.

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