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How does a smaller kid check a larger one in the defensive zone

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08-10-2012, 09:25 PM
  #1
happyhab*
 
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How does a smaller kid check a larger one in the defensive zone

I know this may sound like a strange or weird question, but what I'm trying to ask here is what is the correct thing for the smaller kid to do, what if the smaller kid doesn't have the pyshical strength to pin the bigger kid along the boards? Should he stay tight and use his hockey smarts in not letting the bigger kid get away by jockeying him? Forcing the bigger kid to continue holding the puck or passing it off. Thanks serious replies only

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08-10-2012, 09:28 PM
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TieClark
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It's all about positioning... you can tie a guy up regardless of your size but if you're talking about a bigger player overpowering a smaller one in the offensive zone (D for the smaller player), the goal for the smaller player is to angle the bigger player where he wants him to go. Quick sticks and reading plays will trump physical strength every time

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08-10-2012, 10:55 PM
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Jacob
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Stay tight to them, wait for them to commit and quickly separate the man from the puck.

Try using your stature as an advantage, get under the player if he's shielding the puck with his body.

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08-10-2012, 11:36 PM
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LatvianTwist
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Get under them and explode up. Use your legs to check, not your arms. I've absolutely destroyed some defensemen bigger than me doing this.

Against the boards, just keep them tight and away from scoring areas. Positioning is extremely important.

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08-11-2012, 12:57 AM
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hockeyisforeveryone
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By small i think you meant to say weak? Size is never an excuse or factor to how you play the game.

How was Bruce Lee so powerful? How does Gionta, Cammelari, Gerbe, St. Louis win the puck battles they always do? Its the will to be a force out there.

As a much smaller player I still made myself into the player to be feared, who you had to keep your head up against or get rocked. It's not about size, its about strength and skill, being fearless.

Get a (stronger) teammate to sticks and pucks, battle full out in just a corner to the net. After 15 seconds your gut aches...keep repeating in a 2 hour session, once or better yet twice a week...you're going to be much stronger and better at taking control of the play.

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08-11-2012, 04:05 PM
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well my son is smaller but is hard to knock off the puck, his core is pretty strong, problem is when a bigger kid has the puck rotating off the boards he never uses his body he just positions himself so the bigger kid has to pass the puck off or lose it, I was wondering if coaches expect him to pin the bigger kid or what he is doing is fine. Thanks for the replies so far

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08-11-2012, 04:27 PM
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If the other player is trapped in the corner and your son doesn't give him a free path to the net coaches will be fine.

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08-11-2012, 07:56 PM
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Playerwinner
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What position does he play?

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08-11-2012, 11:14 PM
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biturbo19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Analyzer View Post
If the other player is trapped in the corner and your son doesn't give him a free path to the net coaches will be fine.
They won't be fine if he still let's the guy throw the puck to the front of the net and/or other dangerous scoring areas.

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08-11-2012, 11:29 PM
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Patmac40
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Separating people from the puck isn't all about size or strength. So staying in the proper position in the d-zone (in between them and the net) with an active stick and keeping knees bent to brace for any impact will be key to checking a bigger player.

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08-12-2012, 12:35 AM
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IDuck
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if he is making them force that pass back up the boards and it isnt a cross ice pass, then yes he is doing good....this may sound weird but a judo class may help him, it will teach him little things like how you control 1 part of the body, you can control other things...for example, if i can "control" a players elbow i can control his stick, so if i can LEGALLY make contact with the elbow (position my body) that player is going to be able to control that stick like he would like...basically the little things that make a huge difference for a player of smaller size

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08-12-2012, 11:09 AM
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bigbadbruins1
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Quote:
Originally Posted by happyhab View Post
well my son is smaller but is hard to knock off the puck, his core is pretty strong, problem is when a bigger kid has the puck rotating off the boards he never uses his body he just positions himself so the bigger kid has to pass the puck off or lose it, I was wondering if coaches expect him to pin the bigger kid or what he is doing is fine. Thanks for the replies so far
When you pin a player to the boards have your kid put his leg in between the other players legs (aka lock knees). Makes it so he cant go anywhere and then you can have your center/ support player swoop in and grab the puck.

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08-12-2012, 12:30 PM
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Starbuds
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LatvianTwist View Post
Get under them and explode up. Use your legs to check, not your arms. I've absolutely destroyed some defensemen bigger than me doing this.

Against the boards, just keep them tight and away from scoring areas. Positioning is extremely important.
I can't count how many times I've been hit in the head by hits like this; probably because of the amount of times I've been hit in the head.

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08-14-2012, 10:57 AM
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heusy_79
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Biggest thing is to always stay on the defensive side of the puck. Hound larger puck carriers with an active stick and keep them to the outside. Drive your shoulders and hips into opponents rather than using your arms and go at their center of gravity ( so many kids still want to launch themselves at their opponents head). Also try to lean hard on your stick in the corners and remember that the hardest working guy usually comes up with the puck.

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08-14-2012, 02:53 PM
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RoyalGremlin
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My greatest High School hockey moment when i was 14 and definitely under 5 feet, 4-11, probably 120 pounds (probably even 110), i got hammered at the blue line without the puck and no penalty was called, i didn't know who hit me, probably one of the defensemen.

I got up, skated hard back to my defensive position, the puck was already in the defensive zone. I stopped at the left dot with a full out spray and as i turned to see the left defenseman passing it to the right defenseman, who was at least 5-10 or 6 feet, the other guys on my team said he was bigger but it all happened so quickly.

The right defender decided to step up to go for a shot, skating it (right hand shot), into the hash marks. As my right skate crossed my left foot, i was going in for the hit right away, and in three cross-steps, i dipped my left shoulder and launched it right in his solar plexus.

He flipped backwards really hard, smashed the back of his helmet on the ice. I regained my balance pretty quickly and the first thing I saw was both benches on each team hollering about the hit and cheering. I put my hands up to celebrate the hit, everybody laughed.

Then I saw the guy still motionless on the ice, I was like holy ****. (he got up and left the game under his own power, muttering ill things about me)

Each guy on the other team even congratulated me on the hit in the handshake line after the game.

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08-14-2012, 03:03 PM
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OpenIceHit42
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Ask TJ Oshie how he dropped Zdeno Chara


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