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Who am I defending?

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Old
08-17-2012, 06:05 PM
  #1
turbodaze
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Who am I defending?

I'll probably be Left or Right Wing when playing ice hockey in this new C Division. Who do I guard when I'm playing?

How do I know who I guard at all times or do I switch it up each time and do improv where I go to one new person each time to defend?

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08-17-2012, 06:29 PM
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neksys
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Quote:
Originally Posted by turbodaze View Post
I'll probably be Left or Right Wing when playing ice hockey in this new C Division. Who do I guard when I'm playing?

How do I know who I guard at all times or do I switch it up each time and do improv where I go to one new person each time to defend?
At your level, its probably easiest to concentrate on defending a zone rather than an individual player -- too easy to lose your man.

Generally speaking, if you are playing wing, your defence "zone" will be roughly from the blue line to the faceoff dot in your zone, on the side you are playing. If the puck comes to that area, try to get on it. If it gets passed to a guy in your zone, that is your man.

You do not want to end up down behind your own net, or on the opposite end of the ice from your side. Leave the area closest to the net for your defenders. Let your centreman support them.

This not only makes sure that your "area" isn't left wide open, but it also frees you up if/when your team gets the puck back. If your team gets the puck, you can start skating towards the other net - get open and be ready to accept a pass. Thats a basic transition play.

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08-17-2012, 06:32 PM
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kr580
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It would probably be easier to just make one single post with all your questions dude.

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08-17-2012, 07:27 PM
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turbodaze
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I'm thinking of all these questions when it comes to mind.

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08-17-2012, 07:47 PM
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Steelhead16
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See if this makes sense.

http://howtohockey.com/the-role-of-a-winger-in-hockey

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08-18-2012, 08:49 PM
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DJnet65
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This is a pretty basic video of the defensive responsibilities in your defensive zone.

This is a basic starting point.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1TQdDiaf1jA

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08-19-2012, 01:45 PM
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For a beginner, keep it simple. The winger watches the point, period. Head on a swivel, stick in lane, discourage any pass to that player.

Let the D and centre do the work in the D-zone, otherwise, the opposing D-men will be wide open kill you. (And your teammates will want to kill you.)

The one exception I would say is if you see an opposing player COMPLETELY open in the slot with his stick ready for a shot. At that point, you go to him and leave the point open. Once the D or centre come back to take that open player, go back to covering the point.

Follow these two rules and you'll be more defensively responsible than 80% of the wingers in your league.

(And yes, be ready to breakout once your team controls the puck. But you asked about D responsibilities.)

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09-25-2012, 08:20 AM
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It all depends on where the puck is.

If the other team has the puck in your zone and its deep then...

Wingers should stay on their respective wings. In between the puck and the other teams defensive players. Playing zone. Trying to shut down a pass option to the defense. If the puck comes up to the defense, try to force him to dump it back in by blocking his shooting lane and forcing him wide.

If the puck is low, centers should act as a 3rd defenseman. Also a zone player. When a puck is near the boards, your defender should go after the puck to create pressure and you will act as a safety. Force any players near the front of the net away from the net and if he chooses to stay force him out physically but legally. put a body on the guy. if he chooses to leave the front of the net, keep an eye on him and look around for any unmarked men. You should be the last forward out of the zone, make sure the puck is cleared before you try to rush to offense.

As a defender, like i said if the puck is on your side down low, apply pressure. Dont go crazy into the puck cuz u dont want to be left for dust and keep your stick in his passing or shooting lane for deflections or interceptions. Apply pressure but force the player with the puck away from the net and upwards or behind the net. If your the dman away from the puck, look for an open man near the net and apply coverage and force him away.

Dont charge for offense unless you know your team can clear the zone and leave the neutral zone. Basically your first job is to ensure possession, your second is to get it down low and spread the puck and keep it in their zone.

Forwards will forcheck and try to keep possesion down low, defense will stay at the point trying to open up or keep the puck in the offensive zone. In the offensive zone, the game is less strict and you can be a little more free but be smart. Look where your teammates and the puck is at all times.

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09-25-2012, 12:53 PM
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Yeah if you're watching the NHL you see all 5 guys collapse down low and you may think you need to get into the scrum. But what you would be missing here is that the pro wingers have the speed to get back into position covering the point if the puck gets back there, not to mention the ability to block the shooting lane with their body.

At our level we don't have that kind of skating, and would be just asking for injury if we started trying to block shots. So as a winger keep it simple and focus on covering your dman and taking away the point shot. Also have to be receptive along the board to retrieve a puck from one of your dmen and get it out of the zone.

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09-25-2012, 03:09 PM
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Kritter471
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I agree with everyone here that the primary job is to watch your point. Make sure you're between either the pointman and the passer or the pointman and the net at all times. If that pointman moves away from the point, you can follow him IF AND ONLY IF no one rotates with him back into that point. If someone comes up to that point to replace him, then he becomes your man and the original pointman belongs to someone else (likely the center).

However, in the lowest divisions, there will come times that there simply is no one at your point (because low-level adults on offense often channel mites and swarm down low in the zone with everyone on the ice). If and when this happens, take the closest person to your point and cover him. If one of your teammates is already on him, communicate about who should cover the guy closest to you two and who is taking the open guy somewhere else on the ice. But always keep an eye on that point - if someone rotates back up there, it's unlikely one of your teammates will follow, and he then becomes your responsibility.

So to recap:
Primary responsibility - to be on somebody at all times. Standing there guarding space (and I see a lot of beginning wings do this) essentially gives the other team a 5-on-4.
Secondary responsibility - to be on the guy at your point

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09-25-2012, 03:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DJnet65 View Post
This is a pretty basic video of the defensive responsibilities in your defensive zone.

This is a basic starting point.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1TQdDiaf1jA
I've been using that same video for five years for newbies. It works extremely well for simple man coverage in the defensive zone.


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09-25-2012, 03:40 PM
  #12
RandV
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kritter471 View Post
However, in the lowest divisions, there will come times that there simply is no one at your point (because low-level adults on offense often channel mites and swarm down low in the zone with everyone on the ice). If and when this happens, take the closest person to your point and cover him. If one of your teammates is already on him, communicate about who should cover the guy closest to you two and who is taking the open guy somewhere else on the ice. But always keep an eye on that point - if someone rotates back up there, it's unlikely one of your teammates will follow, and he then becomes your responsibility.
What are you talking about? That sounds like the perfect opportunity to set yourself up for a breakaway pass!


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09-25-2012, 04:49 PM
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opivy
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That is an awesome Video Jarick - I'm sending this to my entire team this year.

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09-27-2012, 02:03 AM
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Kritter471
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RandV View Post
What are you talking about? That sounds like the perfect opportunity to set yourself up for a breakaway pass!

Hah, you'd think, right?

The image that usually strikes me though is the beginning wing grimly standing at the point, guarding it like they think they're supposed to, with absolutely no offensive player in the area. They always look so serious and focused and have no clue that they're doing really nothing to help by defending empty space.

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09-27-2012, 09:25 AM
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a winger at a beginner level should be within 2 strides or a stick and a half away from the d-man on his side at all times, the idea is that if you are close enough you can disrupt or block shooting lanes withing a stride................


exceptions being

- a opposing forward coming out above the faceoff dot from the corner, you are ok to step up and force him to dish/shoot or strip him. but always be aware that the point man is still your man and if you over commit to the forward he can quick dish to your point man and he is wide open.

my advise would be to use quick starts and stops when coming in to cover a forward circling high. a winger who sticks to his dman will cause that dman to back out of the zone early instead of holding the line. this helps alot with breakouts.

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09-27-2012, 09:26 AM
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Originally Posted by RandV View Post
What are you talking about? That sounds like the perfect opportunity to set yourself up for a breakaway pass!

ha ha yep, hit me bro im at the other bluelien

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09-27-2012, 09:45 AM
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exceptions being

- a opposing forward coming out above the faceoff dot from the corner, you are ok to step up and force him to dish/shoot or strip him. but always be aware that the point man is still your man and if you over commit to the forward he can quick dish to your point man and he is wide open.
Agreed. I've bitten on that "overcommit" scenario often. It's tough, savvy players try to get you to chase them and then they dish to the point man, who often is already heading down the boards to receive the pass. And then you have no one.

I've started to take the approach of sliding lower when I see a forward skating up along the boards to force the puck carrier high (up towards the point man). But I stay with my D as the F skates past in case the F dishes the puck to him. Sometimes this allows me to stop the pass from the F and clear the zone.

If the F keeps the puck, he can skate into the middle of the ice, which granted can be bad. But at that point the centre has to be available to take him.

I'm open to any suggestions on how to play that situation better.

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09-27-2012, 11:15 AM
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To elaborate on the video,

At lowest levels (beginner and low D hockey), the defensemen will either chase the puck right into the slot along with everyone else or stay glued to the blue line near the boards no matter what. At that level, as a wing you want to cover the defenseman, if he's at the boards or in the scrum. Make sure he's not open.

As you progress through the levels, the defensemen pick their spots and can jump in and out of the play. It's not uncommon to see the D-man jumping up with the puck from the point into the slot, even forechecking and rotating with the other defenseman or wingers/center. This is where playing zone defense is a little more important and requires experience and communication with your teammates.

Once your team gets possession, get ready for the breakout by going to the hash marks near the boards with your stick on the ice. Do that whether or not the other team's defenseman is at the point or anywhere else. If he leaves you wide open while you're breaking out, take full advantage.

Just don't ever sit behind the other team when they have possession because it's basically given them a power play. That's called cherry picking and everybody hates it.

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09-27-2012, 01:40 PM
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Agreed. I've bitten on that "overcommit" scenario often. It's tough, savvy players try to get you to chase them and then they dish to the point man, who often is already heading down the boards to receive the pass. And then you have no one.

I've started to take the approach of sliding lower when I see a forward skating up along the boards to force the puck carrier high (up towards the point man). But I stay with my D as the F skates past in case the F dishes the puck to him. Sometimes this allows me to stop the pass from the F and clear the zone.

If the F keeps the puck, he can skate into the middle of the ice, which granted can be bad. But at that point the centre has to be available to take him.

I'm open to any suggestions on how to play that situation better.
yeah as you say a fwd is looking for that dish, a winger who is aware can make it look like he is overcommiting and the pick off that pass for a breakaway. or slam on the breaks and get right back in teh dmans face. its always a tough play but if you break it up oncve or twice they arent even going to bother coming back out to the top of the circles anymore.

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09-27-2012, 03:32 PM
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ponder
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On top of what has already been mentioned, it's key that you not only cover the points as a winger, but also know how to properly break out. Any time you feel the puck is about to come up the boards on your side of the ice, make sure you get to it before the dman, and either chip it out, skate it out or pass it out. If someone on your team gains solid control of the puck deep in your zone, come down low from the point and get open for a pass, keeping speed at all times. All the defending in the world is useless if you can't break out of your zone.

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Old
09-27-2012, 03:33 PM
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Jarick
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All the defending in the world is useless if you can't break out of your zone.
+1 to that

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09-27-2012, 04:42 PM
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yes please,

as a forward converted to defence nothing drive me more crazy than me working my sack off to free up some space and i look to break out of the zone and there is a C beside me and both wingers standing still.

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09-28-2012, 10:49 AM
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Good advice here. If you're a winger it's you job in your end to cover the defenseman @ the point. It's also your job to be a good outlet/pass option for your team if they get control of the puck.

So, stay between your man and the net, but far enough away to intercept a puck coming around the boards or take a pass & have a bit of space.

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09-29-2012, 11:00 AM
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Funny how everyone here knows that the winger is supposed to cover the point but in practice, they never do.

Related question: Is it bad form to cover the point too much in pickup hockey?

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09-29-2012, 01:33 PM
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Kritter471
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Depending on the level you're at, a lot of times the wingers are the newest/lowest-level players on a team, so it doesn't surprise me they don't always know where to stand.

Plus more than half the time, the defensemen and center are out of position as well (often chasing the puck), but it's a lot harder to tell when they're nowhere near they're guy because of the amount of rotation low in the zone.

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