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Last Movie You Watched and Rate It (Part XVI) ‎

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Old
12-08-2012, 12:00 AM
  #251
Stu Macher
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Originally Posted by rey72335 View Post
My issue with current films is that just about anything gets made.. look at all these ridiculous parody movies; Epic Movie, Date Movie, Vampires Suck, etc.. It seems as if writers rely on other films to write their own. And we have all these series‘.. Saw had what, 7 films? Paranormal Activity is up to no.4 with plans for more.. The Fast and the Furious is up to their 5th and have more planned.. The films seem to get worse as they go as well.. And then filmmakers go and remake classic horror films; Halloween, Friday the 13th, Nightmare on Elm Street.. I have no memory of a recent horror movie coming out that actually scared me. But perhaps I need to check from around the globe, as North America seems to “commercialize“ horror films.

I feel it's unfair to judge a period by the negative aspects, especially the current period. There is a tendency to romanticize the past, and there is a good reason for that: the cream rises to the top. Bad things don't stay in memory, they fade into oblivion. There has always been crap, it just doesn't stick around. Sure, right now we're living in a world that gives us 7 Saw films, and remakes are prevalent. But in 10-15 years, those are going to exist only in 5 dollar bins, and we'll think of There Will Be Blood, or Mulholland Dr., or The Social Network, or Cache. Sure, the 21st century has given us Star Wars prequels and The Love Guru and the (Blank) Movie franchise. But we've also been given In the Mood for Love, Werckmeister Harmonies, Zodiac, No Country for Old Men, Once, Talk to Her, and United 93. You have bad action franchises like Transformers, but there are also terrific and intelligent "action" films like Master and Commander, Munich, and Oldboy.

Last year we got films from Terance Malick, Lars Von Trier, Werner Herzog, Pedro Almodovar, Steven Soderbergh, and Steve James, but also saw the emergence of Jeff Nichols and Sean Durkin as filmmakers that deserve attention. This year is giving us another film by Michael Haneke, Quentin Tarantino, and Paul Thomas Anderson.

It is now, as it always is, a wonderful time in film, from all around the world. Just look what has come out of Iran in the last 15 years. It took the fantastic A Separation (my #1 film of 2011) to get me to notice it, but it's a goldmine. There's always films to discover from any period of time, and each new year brings new possibilities, whether they are from familiar masters, or exciting newcomers.

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12-08-2012, 12:21 AM
  #252
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I suppose.. but as I said before, when it comes to international films, aside from “Amélie“ I find myself ignorant. I do not know much about them, about the performers, or directors.. I do plan on learning though.
That being said, I have been meaning to watch “The Artist“ recently. I‘d love to see how a silent-film was pulled off in such a technologically-sound time. Considering it has the great Malcolm McDowell in it, even in a small role, it should be good.

Overall, I think the last time I‘ve genuinely wanted to go to the theatre and see a specific film was when “Valkyrie“ came out. Granted it wasn‘t exactly the best film, nor am I a big Tom Cruise fan, but I love the history aspect of it.. too bad the attempt failed.

My issue with current films is that just about anything gets made.. look at all these ridiculous parody movies; Epic Movie, Date Movie,
Just one example. Add A Separation to your list. It's from Iran, won the Academy Award as best foreign language film last year, and made a few top ten lists around here in 2011. It is just one of many great 21st century international films. If you have catching up to do, that's cool--you will find a lot to enjoy.

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12-08-2012, 12:46 AM
  #253
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Originally Posted by rey72335 View Post
Okay, my list of films to watch now consists of:

The Birth of a Nation - 1915
The General - 1927
M. - 1931
Duck Soup - 1933
Gone with the Wind - 1939
Wuthering Heights - 1939
Citizen Kane - 1941
Children of Paradise - 1945
The Third Man - 1949
All About Eve - 1950
A Place in the Sun - 1951
Singin‘ in the Rain - 1952
Gentlemen Prefer Blondes - 1953
From Here to Eternity - 1953
On the Waterfront - 1954
Rear Window - 1954
Guys and Dolls - 1955
Giant - 1956
12 Angry Men - 1957
Vertigo - 1958
Some Like it Hot - 1959
Mutiny on the Bounty - 1962
Dr. Zhivago - 1965
Last Tango in Paris - 1972

Any recommendations are appreciated.. I‘ll watch just about anything pre-1975.
If you're just getting into older films, enjoyed Casablanca enough to put it in your top 3 after one viewing, and want to watch another "mainstream" type flick, Sunset Boulevard is a must. I'd recommend you watch that over anything on your list.

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12-08-2012, 12:58 AM
  #254
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I've seen this movie twice, once in theaters and again as soon as it was released on blu-ray, and honestly, there isn't a week that goes by where I don't think about it. The soundtrack is phenomenal. Does anyone else think that this is one of the most intense and touching scenes in recent years?

"Curtis, open the door"



[


Last edited by chuppa chupp: 12-08-2012 at 01:15 AM.
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12-08-2012, 02:03 AM
  #255
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Jules and Jim (1962)
This film is said to be one of the most influential and most innovating of the French New Wave, if it's true I am not one to say since my knowledge is to limited for that. But one thing is for sure, as innovative and new as it was when it was released, as well does it hold up to this day. To me it does not seems dated at all, if not for the lack of colour and the lesser film quality, you could have told this film was made last year, and I could have believed you. The film is simply timeless. This is largely due to the timeless subject, a well told story of love is always in fashion.

As I said in my The Celebration review, this film also relies on a great script, great acting and great directing without much extravaganza. Oskar Werners performance is amazing, he is so engaging that you can't look away whenever he is on screen. The visual style in the film also impressed me. The camera work isn't trying to blow you out of your seat, but it does a lot of subtle things that helps suck into the film, and keep you there. You don't notice it until you have been putting of a toilet visit for 30 minutes because you don't want to leave the film, even though you have the option of pausing it.

I should be ashamed if I didn't mention the soundtrack, which is great, and greatly shows how the film starts on one note and ends on a total opposite. If you don't like spoilers, you should probably look away for the rest of this paragraph. In the first half the music is like something out of 20's silent comedy. But at roughly the halfway mark the music changes, and so does the film, and from there on out the music seems to get continuously darker until the end of the film.

This is my only 2nd experience with French New Wave, the other being Breathless, and this was a much better experience. Breathless never engaged me in the same was as Jules and Jim did, and script didn't seem to be in the same league as Jules as Jim. Not that Breathless was bad, it just didn't resonate well with me. I will definitely try and look up more Truffaut after this, probably 400 Blows or Shoot the Piano Player, since these seems to be some of his most praised works.

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12-08-2012, 07:12 AM
  #256
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chuppa chupp View Post
If you're just getting into older films, enjoyed Casablanca enough to put it in your top 3 after one viewing, and want to watch another "mainstream" type flick, Sunset Boulevard is a must. I'd recommend you watch that over anything on your list.
While he's at it, my personal favorite Billy Wilder film is The Apartment. I view that as a must see American film.

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12-08-2012, 09:22 AM
  #257
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Originally Posted by Stu Macher View Post
I feel it's unfair to judge a period by the negative aspects, especially the current period. There is a tendency to romanticize the past, and there is a good reason for that: the cream rises to the top. Bad things don't stay in memory, they fade into oblivion. There has always been crap, it just doesn't stick around. Sure, right now we're living in a world that gives us 7 Saw films, and remakes are prevalent. But in 10-15 years, those are going to exist only in 5 dollar bins, and we'll think of There Will Be Blood, or Mulholland Dr., or The Social Network, or Cache. Sure, the 21st century has given us Star Wars prequels and The Love Guru and the (Blank) Movie franchise. But we've also been given In the Mood for Love, Werckmeister Harmonies, Zodiac, No Country for Old Men, Once, Talk to Her, and United 93. You have bad action franchises like Transformers, but there are also terrific and intelligent "action" films like Master and Commander, Munich, and Oldboy.

Last year we got films from Terance Malick, Lars Von Trier, Werner Herzog, Pedro Almodovar, Steven Soderbergh, and Steve James, but also saw the emergence of Jeff Nichols and Sean Durkin as filmmakers that deserve attention. This year is giving us another film by Michael Haneke, Quentin Tarantino, and Paul Thomas Anderson.

It is now, as it always is, a wonderful time in film, from all around the world. Just look what has come out of Iran in the last 15 years. It took the fantastic A Separation (my #1 film of 2011) to get me to notice it, but it's a goldmine. There's always films to discover from any period of time, and each new year brings new possibilities, whether they are from familiar masters, or exciting newcomers.
The sad thing is, I‘ve actually seen both “There Will be Blood“ and “No Country for Old Men“ in the bargain bins, and neither are worthy of that.. but overall I guess it‘s a matter of opinion. Personally, aside from Avatar and the first Dark Knight, I haven‘t seen anything from North America that is truly memorable.. I think The Social Network was only successful because Facebook IS so popular.. if it wasn‘t, I doubt it recieves the same honors.. and it‘s not that I dislike every film that comes out nowadays, I enjoy quite a few of them..

To sum it up, it‘s a matter of opinion.. I think film-makers have begun to rely on others too much; parodys and remakes.. or have just lost all creativity and make the same movie over again. Whether I‘m right or wrong doesn‘t matter, that‘s not what this thread is for. Perhaps the viewing of international films will change it, getting my mind away from the repetitive-ness of ‘mainstream‘ film.

Thanks to Stu and Chuppa for the additions, they‘ve been added.

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12-08-2012, 09:29 AM
  #258
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[B]
I will definitely try and look up more Truffaut after this, probably 400 Blows or Shoot the Piano Player, since these seems to be some of his most praised works.
Glad to hear that you liked Jules and Jim. 400 Blows and Shoot the Piano Player deserve on merit to be mentioned in the same breath with Jules and Jim. After that, there are a lot of works, especially his lighter stuff, that some people like and some people don't like. By far his most underrated work and a must-see in my opinion is The Wild Child. It is an austere movie about a feral child, and Truffaut plays (and very well) the doctor who tries to help him acclimatize to society. It is just a beautiful film, so I hope you get to it eventually. It's not remotely like anything else in his filmography.


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12-08-2012, 09:41 AM
  #259
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Plus, as far as Truffaut goes, Day for Night is a LOT of fun.

Rey, I hope I didn't give you the impression that I was just trying to say that you were "wrong". I just want to put up a fight for contemporary film.

I guess there will always be people out there who disagree, no matter what you think. For example, I think There Will Be Blood is a better and more personal film than something like One Flew Over the Cuckoos Nest or To Kill a Mockingbird, but I've been told that I'm crazy. You are absolutely right, it all comes down to personal preference.

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12-08-2012, 09:48 AM
  #260
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chuppa chupp View Post
I've seen this movie twice, once in theaters and again as soon as it was released on blu-ray, and honestly, there isn't a week that goes by where I don't think about it. The soundtrack is phenomenal. Does anyone else think that this is one of the most intense and touching scenes in recent years?

"Curtis, open the door"



[
This is Take Shelter isn‘t it? How was the film overall? I‘ve read varied reviews on it, and haven‘t decided if I want to watch it just yet or save it for another time.

I quite enjoy Michael Shannon though. My personal favourite of his was “Before the Devil Knows You‘re Dead“. I bought it on a whim a few years back.. Blockbuster, when it was still in Canada, was selling all films that had no cover sleeve for $1.99, and between that, Lake Placid, and some of those Barbie kids films, I chose Before the Devil.
I knew nothing about it, but the cashier told me it was fantastic.. Sidney Lumet directed it, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Ethan Hawke, Michael Shannon, Marisa Tomei acted in it.. Truly amazing film.

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12-08-2012, 10:05 AM
  #261
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Plus, as far as Truffaut goes, Day for Night is a LOT of fun.

Rey, I hope I didn't give you the impression that I was just trying to say that you were "wrong". I just want to put up a fight for contemporary film.

I guess there will always be people out there who disagree, no matter what you think. For example, I think There Will Be Blood is a better and more personal film than something like One Flew Over the Cuckoos Nest or To Kill a Mockingbird, but I've been told that I'm crazy. You are absolutely right, it all comes down to personal preference.
Don‘t worry, you didn‘t! But there are people who will say that my opinion is “wrong“ because it doesn‘t match theirs. I think I need to stay away from “mainstream film“.. I‘ve seen PLENTY of independent films from the last few years via AFF, and those films have blown a lot of “Holly-wierd“ films out of the water.

I actually agree with you on “One Flew“. I watched the movie after reading the book for English class a few years back, and I have to say that the book is SO MUCH better. I did enjoy the film, but I just don‘t think that it‘s as great as people say. It took me a few tries to watch “One Flew“ after getting it, as I just couldn‘t find myself interested in it.. which is wierd because I loved the book.

EDIT: AFF = Atlantic Film Festival... It‘s a film festival in Halifax every year, and one of Canada‘s largest.


Last edited by Kurdt Kobain: 12-08-2012 at 10:20 AM.
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12-08-2012, 12:24 PM
  #262
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Now that I've completed my re-watch of every season of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, I'll have more time to watch more movies again.

I watched Holy Motors today... that's about all I can say for now, I don't know what to think about it. A very interesting and bizarre film.

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12-08-2012, 01:33 PM
  #263
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This is Take Shelter isn‘t it? How was the film overall? I‘ve read varied reviews on it, and haven‘t decided if I want to watch it just yet or save it for another time.

I quite enjoy Michael Shannon though. My personal favourite of his was “Before the Devil Knows You‘re Dead“. I bought it on a whim a few years back.. Blockbuster, when it was still in Canada, was selling all films that had no cover sleeve for $1.99, and between that, Lake Placid, and some of those Barbie kids films, I chose Before the Devil.
I knew nothing about it, but the cashier told me it was fantastic.. Sidney Lumet directed it, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Ethan Hawke, Michael Shannon, Marisa Tomei acted in it.. Truly amazing film.
Take Shelter is an outstanding movie, check it out. It was among my top-5 films from last year and I know I'm not the only one who thought of it that highly.

Haven't updated this thread in awhile but here's what I've been watching.

Ai WeiWei: Never Sorry (2012)
While not necessarily ground-breaking, I don't see a reason for anyone not to watch this movie. It's informative, interesting, brings us not only into the mind of an artist but the state of Chinese politics. I don't know if it will blow anyone away but I thought it was a very enjoyable learning experience.

Head Games (2012)
Like Ai Weiwei, it is available on netflix right now (at least American). Perhaps it is because I'm a huge hockey fan but this is a very troubling documentary. We all know concussions and head-shots are a big problem in sports but Head Games really shows us how dangerous this can really be. Not only for NHL players but our youth as well. A very conflicting movie as I've played and loved hockey for numerous years and while the evidence is troubling it's hard to weigh out the pros and cons in my mind. Highly, highly recommend it for people on this site as it is a hockey forum and concussions are such a big talking point.

A Canterbury Tale (1944)
Caught up on some Powell and Pressburger films last week starting with A Canterbury Tale which is definitely my least favourite of their films I've seen. While I say least favourite, I don't believe it is a bad movie at all, but for some reason the movie felt unimportant. It tries to come together in the end but I wasn't fully buying it. Still a solid, light mystery movie but a huge step back from The Red Shoes, my previous experience with them, which I consider a masterpiece.

Black Narcissus (1947)
A very explosive finale and gorgeous cinematography really save this from being a middling sort of tale like Canterbury above. It most certainly falls into melodrama but I enjoy that as long as it is done well and here it is done just well enough. It is easy to see how they built off this movie to make The Red Shoes next year which is better in every aspect yet still shares many elements with Black Narcissus. Overall this is an uneven movie but had enough redeeming factors that I quite enjoyed it.

The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp (1943)
Here is a fantastic movie to live up their reputation. I'm usually not a fan of these types of films which try and cover a lifespan but it is done perfectly here. All the leads are wonderfully charming, it is funny, and without a doubt has something to say. Not just about Britain, which I would consider this one of the most "British" movies I've ever seen, but also how the world around us changes. Absolutely loved it.

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12-08-2012, 01:37 PM
  #264
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I love The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp, I think it's a fantastic film. Sure, the Archers aren't known for their subtlety, but their approach really works here. I love all the actors in it, and it is the movie that introduced me to Deborah Kerr, Roger Livesy, and Anton Walbrook, so I'm forever in it's debt.

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12-08-2012, 01:48 PM
  #265
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Arbitrage(2012)

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1764183/

Movie is about a rich influential business man who is about to cash out with a huge retirement by selling his company. Something happens that could derail this and he has a secret in his past.

Movie just misses on all accounts. I wanted to get into it, I wanted to care about the people involved, I wanted to feel the suspense that was suppose to be happening.

I think this could have been a really good movie, tons of potential, but just misses the mark.

IMDB says 6.7, I'm more at a 5.0



12 Angry Men(1957)

Classic movie about 12 men deciding a murder trial.

Movie was very good, especially when you consider it's from 1957. As the men started to pick apart the story it was pretty easy to see where each piece had it's holes. Still very good movie, very good character study of the human mind and stereotypes people carry.

IMDB says 8.9, I liked it a lot but I'd give it 8.0

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12-08-2012, 01:54 PM
  #266
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Lawless - 5/10

I thought they did a great job in designing the sets. The film looked really nice for the most part. Hardy also gave a really nice performance. He had a strong presence whenever he was on camera. There was just too many strange moments for me to take the movies seriously though. Clearly medicine was at it's peak in the 30's because nobody seemed to die. Oh and could they try harder to make the audience dislike Pearce's character? I found it funny how the brothers were all good looking, and Pearce had one of the most obnoxious haircuts I have ever seen. I don't like it when movies try to force rooting interests like that. Too bad, because there was a good movie to be made with this strong cast.

Good Night and Good Luck - 6/10

An interesting story that just didn't work as a movie. It just felt kind of dull through-out. Strathairn was excellent though.


As an aside, does anybody else think that 2012 has been a really weak year for Hollywood movies? 2011 had so many movies that I enjoyed but I am really having a hard time coming up with a good 2012 list. Hopefully Lincoln, Silver Linings Playbook and Life of Pi come to my town before the year is over. They might be able to salvage it.

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12-08-2012, 02:02 PM
  #267
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rey72335 View Post
Okay, my list of films to watch now consists of:

The Birth of a Nation - 1915
The General - 1927
M. - 1931
Duck Soup - 1933
Gone with the Wind - 1939
Wuthering Heights - 1939
Citizen Kane - 1941
Children of Paradise - 1945
The Third Man - 1949
All About Eve - 1950
A Place in the Sun - 1951
Singin‘ in the Rain - 1952
Gentlemen Prefer Blondes - 1953
From Here to Eternity - 1953
On the Waterfront - 1954
Rear Window - 1954
Guys and Dolls - 1955
Giant - 1956
12 Angry Men - 1957
Vertigo - 1958
Some Like it Hot - 1959
Mutiny on the Bounty - 1962
Dr. Zhivago - 1965
Last Tango in Paris - 1972

Any recommendations are appreciated.. I‘ll watch just about anything pre-1975.
Citizen Kane should be at the bottom of this list, if you want to prioritize.

Better yet, let Peter Griffin save you 2 hours.


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12-08-2012, 04:26 PM
  #268
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A friend of mine keeps bugging me to get some Fred Astaire/Ginger Rogers movies... Anybody have a suggestion of what ones to get? He told me Swing Time, but I want more than one. I asked him for others, but he just said "JUST GET ALL OF THEM!"...

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12-08-2012, 04:34 PM
  #269
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Citizen Kane should be at the bottom of this list, if you want to prioritize.
I don't plan on prioritizing.. I kinda just pick a movie out of the bunch of them and watch it.

I've talked to different people about Citizen Kane, and i've gotten varied responses. Some say it's a terrible film, some say it's more than just a film.. a brilliant story, all that. Considering the legacy it's left, regardless of how it is, I think I have to watch it. It's said to be "the greatest movie of all time", and even if it doesn't fall close to that, I want to know why it's said to be that..

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12-08-2012, 04:34 PM
  #270
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Originally Posted by rey72335 View Post
A friend of mine keeps bugging me to get some Fred Astaire/Ginger Rogers movies... Anybody have a suggestion of what ones to get? He told me Swing Time, but I want more than one. I asked him for others, but he just said "JUST GET ALL OF THEM!"...
The big ones are Swing Time and Top Hat.

By the way, another classic that is definitely worth watching is The Thin Man, a delightful comedic mystery featuring possibly the best example of screen chemistry ever, William Powell and Myrna Loy.

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12-08-2012, 05:05 PM
  #271
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I really wish I could watch a lot of these films for the first time again. Watched most of these when I didn't have as strong of an appreciation for film.

@rey72335 I'll throw out my suggestion for your list: I Am a Fugitive from a Chain Gang (1932) Paul Muni is incredible. One of my favorite really old films.

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12-08-2012, 05:10 PM
  #272
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The big ones are Swing Time and Top Hat.

By the way, another classic that is definitely worth watching is The Thin Man, a delightful comedic mystery featuring possibly the best example of screen chemistry ever, William Powell and Myrna Loy.
Thanks again!! The only thing i've seen Fred in was Holiday Inn, and he was terrific in it!! I've seen bits and pieces of his dancing and it's surely impressing.

Have you seen Rashomon? It was in the list of films put there by the uploader, so I figured I would check it out.. It sounds like it would be good..

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12-08-2012, 05:18 PM
  #273
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I really wish I could watch a lot of these films for the first time again. Watched most of these when I didn't have as strong of an appreciation for film.

@rey72335 I'll throw out my suggestion for your list: I Am a Fugitive from a Chain Gang (1932) Paul Muni is incredible. One of my favorite really old films.
Thanks! I know Paul Muni from the 1932 version of Scarface.. He was fantastic in that. And as far as I know, i'm the only person I know that actually enjoyed the original to Pacino's one. Sure, the 1983 one was amazing in its own right.. but the original was thought out so much better. And it did it without all the swearing, the blood, the extreme violence, all that..

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12-08-2012, 07:43 PM
  #274
kihei
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A Werewolf Boy (2012), directed by Sung-Hee Jo: When her mom and the rest of her family move to the sticks, Suni discovers Cheol-su, a feral boy lurking about the grounds whom the family, for unlikely reasons, adopts. Suni takes it upon herself to civilize the boy's wild ways, and the boy tries to please. But when he gets really angry he changes very fast into something neither one of them can control. Still romance may not be completely out of the question. Judging from Hwang In-Ho's Spellbound last year, South Korean commercial cinema has a soft spot for comedy/(ultra-light)horror/romance hybrids aimed at a middle adolescence first-date audience. This one played at TIFF in the fall, and nobody knew what the hell to do with it, which is why I decided to see it now that it has received a limited release. The plots for these films are very basic, one-dimensional good guy/evil villain stuff. But they are well told stories with high production values and likeable young actors. The werewolf/human romance in this one might seem like a Twilight ripoff, but, though hard to believe, Twilight is light years more mature in comparison. A Werewolf Boy is about puppy love and the model it follows is much closer to Edward Scissorhands than anything else. Its sweet, sentimental ending is very nicely done, almost making it seem a bit more substantial than it is. Assuming you are not a 13-year-old girl, if you are looking for a film to fill a hockey-less Saturday night, this probably ain't the ticket. However on the off-chance you are a 13-year-old girl, hey kid, A Werewolf Boy is perfect for sleep-overs.


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12-08-2012, 07:58 PM
  #275
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Children of Men: 6/10

While Cuaron's directing and the cinematography were both excellent, the rest was big disappointment. Annoying characters, more than a few plot holes and a very uneven story, IMO. The final stages become a frantic mess and it ends with one of the most disappointing endings I've recently seen. I can see why some people love it, but I wasn't a fan at all.

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